Skip to main content
10 answers
10
Asked 1819 views Translate

Would it be wise to take AP Calculus to pursue a career in Information Technology?

Hi, I just became a senior in high school and have plans to pursue a career in IT security. I have a choice to take AP Calculus this year. My other options are Business Math or Statistics. Would Calculus be a helpful course to prepare for an IT career? I know it is not a mandatory course to take, like it would be for someone entering Computer Science. But I have looked at other discussions and many people says that it helps you think differently. Thank you for any advice and comments. #information-technology #cyber-security #computer-security #it-management #information-security #it-security

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

10

10 answers


3
Updated Translate

Gail’s Answer

Hi Zachary,


I would look at it a different way. Which of these courses are pertinent to your career and if you are out of work, which will help get a job outside of your field(if needed)? Calculus won't help with any of the IT disciplines I've worked in unless you want to go into a mathematical field. Business math.. hum, I don't know what that is. I personally would take statistics. I am a business analyst and quality assurance person. I was laid off and when looking for a job, saw several for an Data Analyst. They required things like statistics, report writing, data aggregation etc.


You have chosen a very popular profession!


Hope this helps,
Gail

Thank you comment icon Thank you Gail! I will take your advice into consideration. a
3
1
Updated Translate

Jeff’s Answer

I have been in IT for over 22 years and have never needed or known someone who needed that level of math. You would probably need it to design computer electronics or maybe to design software, but I have not been in those sectors so I am not sure. Hope this helps

Thank you comment icon Thank you for your insight! a
1
1
Updated Translate

Jason’s Answer

I'd think of it this way, it's high school math. No one is going to give you a job based on high school math in a technology field role. Before you graduate college, you will have done yourself a major disservice not taking at least one entry level statistics course. Almost every technical professional can do better understanding at least basic stats. When hiring though, I've never discussed a person's HS classes.


Business math usually used for simple evaluations and probably a waste of your valuable time. Don't go the easy path. Even if they have financials and P&L evaluation, again you'll want the college level version to justify your experience when working in industry.


Calculus is like a right of passage for smart kids in college. Nearly everyone applying to a top tier school will have AP Calc on their GPA. The best part about Calc, is its a ticket to entry for nearly all higher level math, economics, and science courses. If you choose to change majors to engineering, computer science, etc. you will value having this course. You'll also have the opportunity to get a math level credit in college and test out for most universities. That means you can take the stat class you want at the college level. Calc also teaches you about basic principles around areas and rate of change that are fundamentals in most science courses. It betters your understanding of how math and the world operate.


Depending on you, your teacher and classmates, AP Calc can be difficult. If you're worried about graduation GPA, this may be too hard, however top schools will be looking for these type of AP courses for applicants. Talk to your high school advisor who can probably give better information about how students are fairing with recruiters recently.


Hope that gives you some decision points to consider.

Thank you comment icon Thank you Jason for your in-depth response! I have gotten pretty good grades in my math classes the past 3 years, so it looks like I should go with Calculus. a
1
0
Updated Translate

Sierra’s Answer

Hello-

I majored in Computer Engineering, and Calculus 1, 2, & 3 were required at my school for Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Software Engineering. I chose to take AP Calculus in high school so I could start with Calc 2 my first semester of college. I think it was definitely worth it. I felt more ahead of the game, and I saved paying for it in college.

Now practically, I can't say that I use calculus on the job. Schools require it for a reason, but I would guess more to build critical thinking skills. But if you plan to go to college , I would certainly suggest taking AP calculus in high school over the other options.

0
0
Updated Translate

Ken’s Answer

Yes it would be wise to take AP Calculus to pursue a career in IT. You are probably going to college and calculus will be required for almost any technical degree. AP calculus will at least give you a chance to learn the advanced math you need for college in advance, and if you pass the AP test you can get credit for the college course, saving you time and money. Having said that statistics is also a very valuable course and more practical for most actual IT career purposes.
0
0
Updated Translate

Kazim’s Answer

Hi, you are talking about high school, I will suggest take as many college credit classes as you can in order to cut down your college work load. At this stage in your life it doesn't matter if it is AP Calculus or AP History, make sure that the your college of choice gives you credit for these AP classes and also take the class you are able to Ace. Calculus will force you think logically and History will force you to retain memorized information, both are good skills to have in college and professional life. My son is working with his high school counselor to select college credit AP classes

0
0
Updated Translate

Elizabeth’s Answer

I have a bit of a different perspective: With 30+ years in the IT/Communications/Cyber field I've found advanced math concepts to be one of the distinguishing features I offer; i.e., it sets me apart in a very positive way to enable my in-depth technical analysis of cryptographic algorithms. So, the best answer: It depends - do you want to first create a depth of knowledge or a width of knowledge? Ideally, over time you'll develop both. I chose depth of knowledge to advance more quickly in a narrow field then broadened my skills. Take a look at the specialization needed for your career interests, try to map those skills to the availability needed to form a Supply/Demand model - it's one approach to help in decision making. Good Luck in whatever you do.
Math-lover turned Cyber-geek, Liz

0
0
Updated Translate

Reemon’s Answer

Hi,
I think the wise thing to do here would be first to know exactly what role or area in the IT industry you like and want to pursue a position in and then reach out to people or professionals who have those jobs or occupy those chosen roles so you can gain an insight of what they do on daily bases, get information, guide, and best things to do to make it clearer and easier for yourself. At this point, you would have a clear picture of what you want along with some guide and direction and that's enough to start reverse engineering the process and create an action plan based on what you have done so far. Your action plan should align all the factors, classes, and resources to efficiently and effectively succeed in achieving the ultimate goal behind all this which is becoming valuable to the marketplace in the chosen role and industry. The reason for doing all that is because IT industry evolved over time and it includes more specialized areas now than ever before, so specialization and role-centered knowledge and expertise has a it's own value in the market place. Any math or calculus classes are helpful in general and especially for a career in IT, and not sure there are any computer science degree that doesn't include math or calculus classes at some level. However, simply make sure all the classes you take are credited and transferable. And only take classes that serve you, reduce your workload, and shorten your path and by doing so saving time, money, and energy too.

Reemon recommends the following next steps:

Conduct a research on the the different roles and area in the IT industry and reach out to proffessionals in IT or people who occupy these desired roles to gain more insight, informations, and advise so you can be more equiped to make an informative decision on which role or area is more suited for you.
Now, you have a specifice role or area in IT and that makes it easier to pick the right degree , classes., and certifications So, armed with that knwoledge create an action plan that incoperates having the most suited degree program, right people (People with the results you want and desire) in your social network, and ways to get experience like volunteering for example , joining a free project, or hands-on lab. But don't waste time waiting for someone to give you the experience.
Increase and expand your social network but with the aim of adding a quality and strategic connections that are meanningful for your career and for your personal development. Having the right people or connections in your circles or sphere matters and can make a huge difference in your career. This is where you start positioning yourself in the marketplac for the right opportunity.
Get out of your comfort zone and get things done to maximize your potential. It is easier said than done but remember success is a result of the accumlated small actions and decisions over period of time. It would help to have a weekly and monthly schedule and anuual goals and use tools like alarms and reminders to be effective in excution.
Lastly, remember that everyone has the same 24 hours everyday, and what you do with it is what makes the difference and that is up to you ultimately. And that also is what puts you in the driver seat and makes your the architect of your future.
0
0
Updated Translate

Otto’s Answer

HS classes are going to be the base for your college. So from that perspective, unless you have a specific liking towards specific fields of math, I would go with the one that provides you with a better training field. Statistics and Business math are very practical fields, and you will have them at College, usually associated with specific fields of application. Calculus on the other hand, can work as stepping stone for any mathematical field. You could associated it with basic algebraic functions. A solid foundation supports your development into whatever mathematical field you go.

0
0
Updated Translate

Dhruvil’s Answer

Hello, It depend on how good you are at math. Since in high school all topics are not get cover, sometime it will cause hard time.

0