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My grades are pretty good and i want to go to college but i dont know what i want to do. I like technology and business stuff but i just dont know

I like science and technology i also believe im persuasive so l like being able to defend something or try to turn a tide in my favor. I also like business aspects of things #technology #business #curious


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John’s Answer

Science – Technology – Engineering – Mathematics (STEM) careers are incredibly important to help with the economy, technological advancement, and our environment. With the world being more connected than ever, and with an increasing population, there will be new challenges to face in the future that might only be solvable with STEM advancements. Since STEM plays an increasing role in our everyday lives, it is important to have more people who work in those fields to make up for the demand. Currently, there are not enough people who are interested in STEM, nor are they being educated in those fields in school. In addition, careers in STEM are not nearly being represented enough by females. By having a lack of females in this career, there is a lack of diversity–which could stagnate overall progress. In order to make up for this deficiency, there has been a large push by education sectors to entice more people to join these careers. If you are interested in a STEM career, there is currently a large demand for them, and they often pay well. As technology still continues to evolve and we become more reliant on the digital world around us, jobs within the STEM field are likely to become more in demand. This means it is a brilliant time to try and encourage more women to pursue STEM related careers.

CYBER SECURITY
With technology advancing and cyber-crimes on the rise, the security of a company’s electronic information needs protecting now more than ever. IT and computing is another male dominated industry, but it doesn’t need to be. As an innovative career, cyber security work involves developing new ways to improve a company’s security, documenting/simulating security breaches and recognizing flaws within a system. If you’re knowledgeable about IT, love solving problems and enjoy analyzing security systems and are always aware of common and upcoming threats and trends within the field, a career in cyber security choice for you.

ENGINEERING
A heavily male dominated industry, engineering is a highly paid and skilled job and there is a huge need for more female engineers. Engineering is a diverse, creative and exciting career and gives you the opportunity to do something life changing. Engineering is a fantastic career for women and there are thousands of female engineers doing amazing things. From designing future cities and transport systems, to making innovations in healthcare technology and space exploration.

DEVELOPER
At a time where the world is relying on websites and apps; the need for skilled developers is high. Imagine the opportunity to develop or even create a brand new app that could help thousands of companies across the world thrive during the pandemic. Although learning coding is mainly attractive to males, a stronger push to encourage women to learn even basic code is becoming more prominent from the education industry and the UK government. This career is an opportunity to be creative and innovative and also problem solve along the way. Once you get to grips with the language of coding, you’ll be highly employable.

Hope this is helpful TB

I found this very helpful actually i have more of an better answer for myself now, thanks ! T B.

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Simeon’s Answer

I would recommend going to the department of labor's website (https://www.dol.gov/) and looking at fields that are doing well right now. For those who have hit a wall in their job search, it can be helpful to have a few ideas to get the ball rolling. I'd then look at videos on YouTube where you can see real workers explain what they love and hate about their careers.

If you are interesting in computers and coding, I would recommend trying out game jams like the one done by Game Maker's Toolkit on itch.io. He has a very successful game jam that he runs every year, where people compete for a few days to make a game that matches a theme. You can check out the results of previous game jams on his YouTube channel. They have a passionate community on Discord and share a lot of tips and resources with each other. Even if you're not looking to get into gaming, participating in short term projects (just a few days long in this case) will help provide the structure and focus to develop your coding skills.

Thank you very much ill look into it ! T B.

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Shaan’s Answer

Hi T B,

One of the benefits of college is the ability to explore a variety of different fields. A significant amount of students at college change their majors, often times more than once, because they are exposed to new fields they hadn't previously thought about. Some also realize that the field they thought they would be interested in was actually not the best for them, so they decide to look elsewhere. When you enroll in a university, you don't take major-level courses immediately, but rather start with general education courses for about the first two years. This gives you a cushion to really test the waters and explore everything college has to offer. You could also take those general education classes at a local community college. This would allow you to explore a variety of fields without the financial burden of traditional university. Overall, the ability for you to discuss with your peers and professors your future career aspirations will be massive in helping you make the final decision on your career path. So I would say keep your options open and look into everything that piques your interest!

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Christina’s Answer

2 areas that I would look into are product management and venture capital!

Product management is a role that is often described as in the intersection of technology, business, and design (naturally marrying together your interests). You work cross-functionally with engineers to help create the roadmap to build a product, as well as get to look at user requirements and needs to best determine a go-to-market and business strategy.

Venture capital is another career that combines interests in tech and business. As a VC, you get to help multiple startups build their companies. It'll be beneficial to have technical knowledge to evaluate the startups and be able to help early-stage founders build and business knowledge to understand metrics, financial models, etc. to see if the startups have a shot of becoming a success. Venture capital is a super competitive field nowadays, there seems to be more funding than good startups. Therefore, your persuasive skills will be key to help you land great deals and fund cool startups!

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Jay’s Answer

T B,

One of the benefits of your first 2 years in university is that you get a rare opportunity to explore a variety of subjects. Many universities do not require you to declare a major until your second year, so use that time to take a variety of courses in different areas (you likely will need to do this anyway to satisfy your general education requirements). By doing this, you can get more ideas into the real-world applications of the various subjects, which can help lead you to an interest in a career.

Best of Luck

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Cynthia’s Answer

I would start with your basic classes and see what spikes your interest. Business administration and computer science are great degrees.

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Pete’s Answer

There are many schools that offer degrees that combine business classes and computer science classes. This combination is very advantageous in the world of business as it provides you with skills that are particularly relevant to both business leaders and technologists.

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Nick’s Answer

Focus on a degree in Business Administration and a minor in computer science. The most successful leaders in technology have an understanding of technology but are gurus in the business and act as a strategic translation.

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Catherine’s Answer

I would look for careers in data analytics. This will let you work in science and tech, but you will learn to make arguments around the data you work with!

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Leah’s Answer

I like the idea of a sales engineer. I am yet to meet one that does not like their job. It isn't easy, but it is rewarding. To pursue this, I would reach out to some on LinkedIn that works for an org that you find interesting...they would likely offer advice.

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john’s Answer

Take the first year and take basic classes , see what your into. Def business classes to start. What is your passion?

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Samantha’s Answer

If you think you are persuasive, a career in law could be a great fit for you. Given your interest in business, I'd recommend taking some classes in business law to see if you enjoy them. You may also be able to integrate business law with your interest in technology. Many business schools also offer business law classes related to technology, such as internet law and privacy. If you enjoy those types of classes, you may want to consider becoming a lawyer that specializes in something related to technology.

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Ashley’s Answer

Hello, I recommend that you look into local companies that have tech departments to get your hands on different tech items and knowledge. Some places like Best buy, Office Depot, Office max, Stables or your local electronic store. Also look into some trade school that can give you the training and experience credits as well.

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Atul’s Answer

You live in Boston and it has many high tech companies.

I recommend pursuing Computer Science undergraduate since Corp America is short on Software Engineers.

You will enjoy what you do - also will have many companies to explore and pay is also good.

I lived in Boston for few years and worked for high tech company and the best part is that you don't have to relocate.

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Shayne’s Answer

Hello T B!

Have you tried reaching out to your school guidance counselor? They may be able to provide you great insights based on your profile and skills that may fit your future career. They often would ask you further questions and might let you answer a profile exam so they can recommend the best course for you in college. It's okay to be confused and to not really know what to pursue this time. What you like right now is very relevant in our current business world, but your likes can also vary as you grow older. So take your time to figure out what you really want to do in your life. Ask yourself what really is your passion (This is very different from just a "like") and I strongly encourage you to talk to your teachers so you can get more useful insights on your career goals. Good luck and all the best!


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Stephanie’s Answer

Hello,

I was actually torn like you on what route to take or what program would offer a mix of both. I ended up choosing an Information Systems and Operations program and it was the best of both worlds. It also helped me decide if I want to be more in business or in technology after the wide range of courses those programs offered. It was STEM accredited program which covered Business Analytics, Data Science and Information Technology - good luck!!


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Holly’s Answer

Hi T.B.,
This is a great question. Here are some thoughts below regarding your question. Think about these points, which may help you in your decision making.
-go in undeclared for first couple of years
-try community college/ two year school, you don't have to go to a 4 year university immediately, it is OK to switch majors
-join clubs at school: visibility to your options and meeting new people
-passion vs opportunities: where are the next 10+ years going? technology is growing!
-find mentors in fields you are interested in, better perspective
-research: social media, youtube... find a view/ picture of what it is like to be in this occupation
-internship
Good luck!

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Holly’s Answer

Hi T.B.,
This is a great question. Here are some thoughts below regarding your question. Think about these points, which may help you in your decision making.
-go in undeclared for first couple of years
-try community college/ two year school, you don't have to go to a 4 year university immediately, it is OK to switch majors
-join clubs at school: visibility to your options and meeting new people
-passion vs opportunities: where are the next 10+ years going? technology is growing!
-find mentors in fields you are interested in, better perspective
-research: social media, youtube... find a view/ picture of what it is like to be in this occupation
-internship
Good luck!

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N’s Answer

Hi T B.!

Since you are interested in Technology, you could go for Computer Science or Information Systems related courses.

You could later pursue a career as a Data analyst , Software Engineer or a Technology Consultant which would be highly suitable given your persuasive capabilities .

I hope this helps!


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Holly’s Answer

Hi T.B.,
This is a great question. Here are some thoughts below regarding your question. Think about these points, which may help you in your decision making.
-go in undeclared for first couple of years
-try community college/ two year school, you don't have to go to a 4 year university immediately, it is OK to switch majors
-join clubs at school: visibility to your options and meeting new people
-passion vs opportunities: where are the next 10+ years going? technology is growing!
-find mentors in fields you are interested in, better perspective
-research: social media, youtube... find a view/ picture of what it is like to be in this occupation
-internship
Good luck!

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Beth’s Answer

In addition to skill and education, knowing your strengths, weaknesses likes and dislikes are also factors to consider when you're exploring career options. You're interest in technology & business could translate into a technical engineering, product management or sales career for instance. It's always useful to make connections with individuals in the field where you can & find opportunities where you can shadow "a day in the life" of that job.

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