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What's the best career decision you've ever made in your lifetime ?

#career-choice #career-choice #career #careers #professional #director #career-choice #careers #career #career-choice

Thank you comment icon I understood from very early on that you don't have to absolutely LOVE your career. There are tons of things outside of your career that you can get involved in, in order to fill those gaps in your life. Rupa

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John’s Answer

Image yourself in the future Deyvon rather than the present, you’ll have a better way of understanding how your decision will impact your goals.

Ask yourself difficult questions like: What will my career be like in 10 years; How will this choice affect my long-term goals; and What kind of new skills or type of growth will this career give me. Even if the offer sounds exciting, if it has no room for development and will limit your learning, then it’s probably best to weigh your options further and to stay put until you’re clear about the goals you truly want. While it’s tempting to throw caution to the wind and just go with your feelings when it comes to your career, it’s always better to gather as much information as you can before jumping into a decision. For example, say, you’ve been working in the same company for 2 years, but an exciting new opportunity suddenly lands in your lap luring you in with a slew of incredible benefits such as travel opportunities and unlimited bonuses. Gather as much data and use as many tools as you can until you come out with a satisfying conclusion before you wave 'goodbye' to your old work, take the time to look into what’s being offered.

My Advice Deyvon career decisions don’t always have to be made in a take-it-or-leave-it situation. Sometimes, you need a little time to look at the broader picture. If it’s too good to be true, then it most probably is.

John recommends the following next steps:

Put together a career action plan, a written document that lays out all the steps you will have to take to reach your goals. Think of it as a road map that will take you from point A to B, then to C and D. Write down all your short- and long-term goals and the steps you will have to take to reach each one. Include any anticipated barriers that could get in the way of achieving your goals—and the ways you can overcome them. This may sound like a lot of work—and it is. But it's much easier to forge a career path when you know what you want. Taking these steps early will save you a lot of struggle and uncertainty in the long run.
Thank you comment icon Thank You David. Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more. John Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Sirish. Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on Earth. John Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Joshua. The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away. John Frick
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Nick’s Answer

One of my best decisions was to take a (paid) internship position related to my studies in engineering. The job was not exactly in my field but it turned into a full and successful career.
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Dawnyale’s Answer

Hello Deyvon,

Understanding the necessity of feedback has been incredibly valuable to me. I learned that receiving information about your performance in a particular area will help you learn how to improve and help you determine what your true strengths and weaknesses are.

For example, when I am not selected to move forward in a hiring process, I always seek feedback from the interviewer or hiring manager in order to know what I should work on for the next time. It's important to listen and not draw your own conclusions, and it's important to ask follow-up questions to ensure you understand what is expected of you.

In my general work, I like to follow-up with my supervisor to know how well I'm performing within certain projects. If I'm able to get feedback soon enough, I'll know how to course-correct for better results.


I hope this helps!
Dawnyale
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Steven’s Answer

Great question!
Years ago I had been working as a pharmacist in a store, filling prescriptions, counseling patients, etc., and I enjoyed it, but I couldn't imagine doing that for a whole career...
The small chain of stores I was with at the time was purchased by a larger chain. When the new leadership came into town to introduce themselves, after the meeting I approached the top guy, introduced myself, and said I would like to be a district manager -as part of my pitch to him I said I know many of the other store pharmacists, and having a "local guy" would send a good message to the rest of the stores that might have some trepidation about the new ownership.
He shook my hand, said "you're my guy", and that led to a whole career in pharmacy benefit management.

So what is the lesson? a few - first off, identify your "next step" (mine was to get out from behind the counter, and being a DM would do that). Second, identify "who" can help get you to that next step. Third, don't just ask for anything - offer solutions that will make that persons life easier. Fourth, don't stop there. If he had turned me down, I would have asked what I can work on to get to that position, and I would have followed up - be a "polite but persistent" presence.

Lastly, always network, network, network. While I was a DM, I volunteered to be on an advisory committee for the local Blue Cross plan. While on that committee I introduced myself to the Blue Cross folks, and some years later I used that connection to network my way into a job - at Blue Cross!
Hope this helps you!
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Marisa’s Answer

Great question! The best career decision I have made took place just recently- and it involved accepting a position which is challenging and different! There are times when I am nervous and hesitant in my abilities, but I am pushing myself. I am proving that I can do things beyond what I thought possible.

My best advice is to always be prepared to take on new challenges and BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. Often times, life's most rewarding experiences come from unfamiliar and spontaneous decisions.

"Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll land among the stars" ~ Norman Vincent Peale
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Tara Michelle’s Answer

To say "YES" even if I felt scared, anxious, or worried that I didn't know enough—that means you're growing! You can always ask for help, learn on your own, figure it out...but opportunities may not always re-present themselves. Even if you fail, do it intelligently but understanding every opportunity is a chance to learn and grow.
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Kevin’s Answer

Hi Deyvon!

One of the best career decisions I made was the transition in my career to software engineering. I originally majored in electrical engineering in my initial education at NC State but tacked on Computer Engineering towards the end of my senior year after realizing how the market and future trends were looking like in terms of technology.

Basically, if you perhaps are not dead set on doing something in particular for your career in the future, please know that as long as you have the drive to continuously learn, you can easily pivot your career into something you truly love!
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Katy’s Answer

The best career decision I have made was to switch to a new role with transferable skills. I have been able to try some very different roles and stayed engaged and challenged. Something to be said to be the Jack of all trades and master of none.
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Mary’s Answer

Hi,

I am a certified public accountant and I was working as a financial auditor in one of the Big 4. I love my audit career and I never thought I am ever going to change career path. But I needed a better work life balance as I was a new mom then so I decided to change career and moved to the education sector. I was worried then that I was going to start something really new for me and I don't even know if I am going to be good at it.
But what made me do it? I thought of what matters most to me...and at that time, I would like to spend more time with my little one.

Now I am part of the leadership team that runs our training institute where I developed good business acumen, agile leadership skills, problem solving and decision making. I realised this provided me the opportunity to know myself more as I dealt with more diverse teams & clients, develop my knowledge about business as I closely worked with the leaders in our company and being part of a business that can give back to the society.

Lesson for me is prioritise what matters most and God will find a way to make things work.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Mary
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Jemima A.’s Answer


The career decision I took and can tag as my best was not looking down on myself because I studied Anatomy.

In Nigeria, those who studied Anatomy are termed as 'morticians' or 'dead bodies' or 'with no future'.. Although, i applied for Medicine for years but got Anatomy instead.

I didn't give up or allow people's talk weigh me down. I defined my path.
I did my research on the specialties open in Anatomy, networked with experts with Nigeria and experts outside my country, Nigeria via LinkedIn. I leveraged on opportunities and today, I work as an Anatomist in Edo State University, Uzairue, Nigeria (a rare opportunity). The only university in Nigeria that has the Anatomage virtual learning table.
This step is really what I am thankful to God for and anticipate bigger ones.

So Deyvon, don't give up on your self when your career struggle gets tough. Do the extra ordinary, research, network, ask questions, put in hard work and the best will come your way.
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Laura’s Answer

Hi Deyvon,

This is something I can speak to because it happened very recently. I was in a Talent Acquisition Coordinator (scheduling interviews) role as a contractor at my current organization. I had the opportunity to interview for two internal recruiting roles and had an external competing offer from a different company while all this was happening. I knew I wanted to make the right choice for myself, but I was juggling all these options, which made it difficult.

I ended up choosing to stay at my current company and receiving the promotion to where I am at today. The main factors that influenced my decision were that I truly believe in the mission and values of my organization, I love the people I work with, and I enjoy the day-to-day responsibilities of my job.

There are so many choices you can make in life but having a career that you enjoy is an extremely important one!

Best,

Laura Wells
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Eleanor’s Answer

This is such a great question! In fact, you should use this in interviews when the hiring manager asks you if you have any questions!

The best decision I made was saying yes to a recruiter who was asking me to apply for a tech support call center supervisor position in Syracuse that would be a night shift. My concerns initially were:
1. This changed my commute from 8 miles to 65 miles each way through the worst region for lake effect snow
2. This put me on opposite shifts from my husband and meant we would barely see each other
3. It meant starting over at a new company when I had already established myself at my current company
4. It meant stepping out of my comfort zone into tech support with a union workforce when my main experience was sales

I agonized over whether or not this was a good move or if I was going to regret it after 6 months. I really didn't want that drive or the sacrifice on family time and I was terrified of tech support.

But wow did it open up opportunities for me that I didn't even know existed. And the night shift was temporary, and the commute? Well, that's gone now too. The company I left actually ended up closing that office the following year as well.

Taking the risk paid off. As long as you can be purposeful, mindful and deliberate about the risk you're taking, go for it.
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Sharhonda’s Answer

Great question! One of the best decisions I've made in my career is to never get too comfortable. Sometimes starting a new position is great and you can't see why anyone would ever leave the company/team/etc. but you may find yourself unhappy there, unable to grow professionally, layoffs, want to relocate, etc. and all of a sudden its time to move on. Big changes come with a bit of discomfort and questioning whether or not you're doing the right thing and that's ok. I learned to not to be afraid of being uncomfortable while pursuing my goals and know when it's time to move on.
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