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what is a job interview like?

11th grade and an athlete #job-interview #interview

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John’s Answer

Allen all companies can of course have different interviewing processes but in general, there is at least one phone interview, also known as a phone screen, and a live, in-person interview. The in-person interview can be with one person or it might be with a variety of people. While they are both important, the live interview is typically the one that will make or break you as a candidate for the position you are interviewing for. Hiring managers are often able to tell from the very first moments of an interview whether a candidate is the best person for the position. They know whether the work environment and team dynamics will suit the personality and working style of the job seeker who sits before them.

TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS – Telephone interviews are generally conducted by hiring managers in an effort to save time and quickly eliminate candidates who do not meet the organization’s requirements. The aim of a phone interview is not necessarily to identify the strongest candidates, but to eliminate the weakest ones. Given that a single open job can attract hundreds of resumes, it is understandable why employers want to screen candidates as efficiently as possible over the phone.

IN PERSON INTERVIEWS – Congratulations! You’ve made it to the final round interview. Hiring managers do not make final round interview invitations for the fun of it—if you've be invited for a live interview you maybe very close to getting the job at this point. So, what can you expect from the final round, and how do you stand out? If you’ve gotten this far, the hiring manger or search committee knows you have the right skills—they’re probably using this final on-site interview to either gauge your cultural fit with the team or compare you to another qualified finalist. While many final round interviews will be about your fit with the company or team, they usually still have some technical component to (again) verify your skills. Feel free to show off a bit.

Hope this helps Allen

John recommends the following next steps:

DRESS FOR SUCCESS – The first impression you make on a potential employer can make a big difference in the outcome of your job interview. The first judgment an interviewer makes is going to be based on how you look and what you are wearing. That's why it's always important to dress appropriately for a job interview.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT – During a job interview, your ability to interact with the interviewer and articulate your thoughts are just as important factors in getting the job as the qualifications listed on your resume. Take some time before the interview to ensure your interview skill set is as ready as your resume.
FIRST IMPRESSIONS COUNT – First impressions really do matter, and you don't have much time to make a good impression during a job interview. From the time you greet the receptionist until the time you leave the building, you're being evaluated as a potential new hire. It's important to leave everyone you meet with the best impression you can.
SELL YOUR SELF – When you're in a job interview, it's up to you to sell your qualifications and credentials to the hiring manager. You'll also need to show the interviewer that you're a good fit for both the position and the organization. With some preparation, you'll be able to present yourself as a candidate any organization would love to hire. Doing your best to get the hiring manager on your side will help you get hired.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Heather. Alone, we can do so little; together we can do so much. John Frick
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Mike’s Answer

I have worked for many different industries in my career. When it comes to interviews there is no single format, every interview is going to be different. Even when looking at the exact same job posting, the interview will change based on the interviewer. Generally I have mostly seen two types of interviews...

Behavioral based: The behavioral based interview process will often pose questions to you structured like... "Tell me about a time when...?" In most cases the interviewer is looking to hear a story, what happened, how you thought through the situation, how you decided to act or what actions you took. And what was the outcome, what did you learn, would you do it the same if you could have a do-over.

Informal: The informal interview in my experience is much more of a get to know you conversation. There is very little structure, because of the lack of structure it can sometimes be more of a challenge. The interviewer will be looking for personality fit, see how you react to an uncomfortable situation, evaluate your ability to hold an engaging conversation, and various other signs about who you are.

The best advise that I can give is to expect that your interview could go either direction or be a combination of both methods. Don't be scared, be true to yourself and confident with your answers. The self image of yourself gets projected in an interview. You are an amazing person and finding the right fit is not easy... Regardless of the result, don't quit, don't give up. For every great interview I've had I have likely bombed 5-10. You're perfect opportunity is out there! Stay positive and know in your heart that you WILL find your fit!
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Bob’s Answer

Its as good as you make it. You are there because you asked to be considered for one or more positions. You need to plan and be prepared to ensure you interview with confidence - you will be competing with others.

We are all different in terms of how we manage interview nerves - but the better prepared you are the more comfortable you will be. you need to dress well, letting the interviewers know that you respect there work environment - the hiring manager or staff should give you guidance. be early, be on time. Make sure you phone is on mute.

Its a process that can include phone interviews, then in person interviews with a panel/x-functional interviewing team, and may include a final interview with the hiring manager - or is can be much quicker. Scope and scale of the interview usually depends on the role you are interviewing for.

In general the interviewers will be prepared with the job description, your resume/portfolio, a set of technical and behavioral questions. You should be prepared and ready to answer the questions. Questions are typically generic but use language to link to the job in question. E.g. tell me about a time when you did x............., or give me an example of difficult time that you/the team had and what did you do to support.

You should be prepared and ready to answer their questions and you should come prepared with your own - not too many but enough to show you are genuinely interested, have done your research, and they are linked to the job you applied for.

If you get a list of the interviewers you may be able to look them up discreetly - se their background, experience, etc..
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Keefer’s Answer

A job interview can vary by the employer and the culture that the company embraces. This interview can be stressful if it is your first time but don't worry because the the person doing the interviewing will understand. If you are interviewing for an entry level position, it will usually take place with only you and the hiring manager/supervisor with basic questions that will focus on your behavior since you will not have much experience. There is an interviewing method called S.T.A.R. that many employers use today. This stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result and it will help the interviewer determine how you would react in certain situations. I would recommend researching this method to get an understanding on how the questions that your interviewer asks should be answered. Take some time with a friend or family member to go over some of the possible questions. This will also help you alleviate some of the tension that you may feel because you are speaking in front of someone and creating a vocabulary of thoughts/words to use during the interview. Good Luck to you!!!

Keefer recommends the following next steps:

Research the company that you are planning on interviewing for. Learn there culture, values, and their mission to see if it is a fit for you.
Research the STAR interviewing method
Practice a mock interview in front of a live person
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Baljinder’s Answer

In my opinion the interview is the process to reach at the mutual agreement with your employer to do the job. Mutual agreement from the employer side are like:
*if she/he has required skill set to do the job
*in case he/she doesn't have the required skills set. Then is she/he eager to learn
*How well this person can fit with the existing team
*What unique quality this candidate has which can add something new to the team.
Mutual agreement from candidate side are like:
*Do they have the product or technology which i want to pursue as my career?
*Is the company work culture in line with your working style if not are you willing to adapt to new change
* how long you are willing to stay with this company?
*work life balance(Which you need to learn as you grow)
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Rini’s Answer

Some great responses already! I would add, job interviews are stressful, especially if you are keen on the opportunity. How do you manage stress:
1) Practice, practice, practice - you can usually google interview Qs in your field. Practice your answers, not just by yourself, but with a partner / friend
2) Manage your time wisely - your answers should be to-the-point. Don't ramble, you can get lost and you will definitely lose the interviewer
3) Be honest - someone said this earlier. If you don't know or haven't done something, say so. Express your interest in learning / picking up that skill
4) Ask questions. Have a few questions ready, if you are given an opportunity to ask questions. It shows you are interested.
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Kim’s Answer

Job interviews certain vary from company to company, role to role. From my experience (finance professional), the interview process generally involves a few rounds. There may be a phone screening with a recruiter followed up by a one-on interview with the hiring manager. If that goes well, you may be asked to meet with additional people. These 'next round' interviews may also be one-on-one or they may involve a panel setting. Some professions may also require proficiency tests as part of their interview process. Some companies may, instead, include questions during the interview process that are designed to test your knowledge of a subject.

As others have also commented, part of the interview process will be an attempt to assess cultural fit. This can be tough as it may mean different things to different companies and to different interviewers. If you are fortunate enough to have options, I believe it pays to research a company and try to apply to those companies where you respect the product, the published core values, etc. Look for good and bad press - do you like what is being said about this company? Of course, not everyone is going to be fortunate enough to be selective in where they want to apply their talents (remember - your skills are an asset that employers are looking for!), but if you can do some research ahead of time, it will give you some insight as to what a company values when they consider "cultural fit".

I, too, would suggest getting comfortable with the STAR approach of interviewing. When I consider a new hire I leverage behavioral questions as a means to understand the thought process of the candidate. I find this helpful in identifying candidates that might not check all the boxes in terms of experience but do have transferable skills. The ability to master these behavioral questions can be very valuable in overcoming what might be seen as gaps in your resume. If you get a question about an experience you don't have, consider a comparable experience. For example, if the question is "tell me about a time when you had to give a big presentation as part of a team to a boss" it is okay to give an example of when you gave a big presentation as part of a team to a class. The skills may be transferable. But be sure to speak to the thought process (how did you approach the assignment from a knowledge gathering perspective), how you worked cross-functionally (e.g. it was important to align early on on a communications strategy so I prepared a collaborative document...), the results (e.g. we were able to complete the assignment on time with all members of the team contributing...) --> the point is to demonstrate how you would handle a situation...the interviewer doesn't really want to know about the presentation ;-)

I would also advise that the interview process be taken seriously. While it is okay to be nervous, you do not want to appear as if you are uninterested in the process/interviewer. You want to be respectful of the interviewers time. Dedicate a time and a quiet place for the interview (should you be attending virtually). Stay in the moment - try not to get distracted by other things/texts/emails/pets/etc.

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dave’s Answer

in my experience the interviewer does MOST if not All of the talking so try and pick your best opportunities to ask and answer their questions

Never lie or say you know something when you do not ...just be yourself and say that you are always eager to learn!

good luck!!
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Clarissa’s Answer

A job interview allows you to share information about you, your skills, your experiences and what qualifies you for the job. It is also an opportunity for you to learn more about the culture of the company.

Before the interview: Study/Research the company, just as you were studying for an exam. Learn about the job you are applying for.

During the interview, make sure you dress professionally. Introduce yourself. Relax.

Answer questions in the S.T.A.R. method. What does this mean? When you are asked a question, start by describing the Situation/Task, provide the actions you took and what the results was.

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Tiffanie’s Answer

A job interview is a great time for you to learn about an opportunity and company as well as tell the interviewer how you'd be a good fit for the position.

During the interview, the interviewer will ask about yourself, likely tell you about themselves and then ask you some questions that will help determine if you are a good fit for the job. Depending on the job they might ask about certain skills that are required for the job, you can find those in the job description. They'll ask you questions about your strengths and weaknesses. Be honest in the interview but never negative.

When I am asked about my weaknesses I might say that sometimes I get overwhelmed if everything I do is not perfect or that I am a yes person, which means I never say no to a task even if I have too many things on my plate.

Interviews are professional so again, make sure you keep it positive. Be excited for the opportunity and study up on the company so you know what they are all about.

Here is some good insight on preparing for an interview: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/interviewing/how-to-prepare-for-an-interview
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Reid’s Answer

The interview is a great opportunity to separate yourself from the other candidates and be known for more than what is just written on your resume. This is where you can go into detail about your previous experience and credentials. I suggest something similar to the S.T.A.R. (Situation, Task, Action, Result) method. For myself, when talking about my previous experience I make sure to explain the value that my work/project brought to the company and demonstrating self-reflection by talking about what I learned from it (and potentially how you used that on a later project).

I create notes for myself and ensure I have a specific example from my previous experiences that relates to a specific competency the job you're interviewing calls out. Creating notes is a great way to prepare and a useful reference tool during the interview.

Make sure to research the company and write some questions to ask the interviewer.
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Kim’s Answer

Allen,

They are all different, and, you can have a good one followed by bad ones. Keep in mind sometimes the person interviewing you has never done interviews before! I've encountered this before. They are supposed to try to make you feel at ease, making small talk, etc. Sometimes there's chemistry and everything clicks, sometimes you want to crawl under the nearest rock. It's all okay!!!! I look at each interview as a training exercise for the next!

I recommend that you interview with one or two companies you have NO interest in working for first, to get over the first time jitters. It can help. Along with everything everyone else has said about preparing. If you are applying for entry level customer service jobs, be sure to have an answer for "how would you handle an irate customer?" The answer is not, "call the supervisor." There are lots of options prior to doing that.

Good luck!
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