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Parent won’t put financial info on Fafsa application. Can I put other parent on it?

I’m trying to go back to school and turn my life around, but I can’t do it without financial aid.

I’m 22, and had to move back in with my father 7 months ago (I was desperate). My father has a gambling and drug addiction, as a result, I’m constantly staying with friends and family members. I go from friends couch, to aunts basement.

My address is at my fathers apartment, but I’m NEVER there. He refuses to give me any of his financial info to put on my Fafsa.

I haven’t lived with my mom since high school, but she did offer to let me use her on my FAFSA application. Can I do that? I don’t live with her.

Neither parent takes care of me financially, but my address is at my fathers.

What should I do?

#college #scholarship #finance #financial-aid #financial-aid #Fafsa #Money

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Hassan’s Answer

https://studentaid.gov/apply-for-aid/fafsa/filling-out/parent-info has detailed info on this situation and how to handle it.

What if my parents are unwilling to provide their information on my FAFSA® form?
You can’t be considered independent of your parents just because they refuse to help you with the FAFSA form. Still, we do understand that in some cases, the parents are not supporting the dependent student at all and refuse to provide their information on the student’s application. If you’re in that situation, here’s the process for filling out the FAFSA form online (or on the myStudentAid app):

When the FAFSA form asks you to provide information about your parents, select the “I am unable to provide information about my parent(s)” option. (If you are using the myStudentAid app, you will need to select the “Learn more” link when you get to the point in the app where it tells you that it looks like parent information is required to calculate your EFC.)

You will then be provided with an explanation of what’s considered a special circumstance. After reading through the options, select the one that says you don’t have a special circumstance but you still can’t provide parent information. (If you are using the myStudentAid app, you will need to select the option indicating that you’d like to be considered for an unsubsidized loan.)

The application explains that if your parents don’t support you and refuse to provide their information on the application, you may submit your FAFSA form without their information. However, you won’t be able to get any federal student aid other than an unsubsidized loan—and even that might not happen. The decision is up to the financial aid office at the college or career school you plan to attend. If you agree to this, you may submit your FAFSA form without parent information.

Your FAFSA information will be sent to the colleges you list, but you won’t get an EFC.

You must immediately contact your school’s financial aid office to discuss the possibility of getting an unsubsidized loan. The financial aid office may ask for a written statement from your parents, indicating that they refuse to provide their information on the FAFSA form and that they no longer support you. (Forms of support include allowing you to live in their home, including you on their car or health insurance, providing a car to drive on a regular basis, and payment of your tuition or fees.)

The financial aid office will look at your situation and decide whether you may receive an unsubsidized loan. That decision is final and cannot be appealed to the U.S. Department of Education.

If you’re considering following this process, think about this first: If you submit your FAFSA form without parent information, you will not receive an EFC. Some state- or school-based aid programs look at the EFC in order to determine your eligibility for their funds; because you won’t have an EFC, you won’t be considered for those aid programs. You could be giving up a chance at many sources of aid. So encourage your parents to provide their information—doing so won’t require them to support you in any way, it’ll just help you be considered for as many sources of financial aid as possible.

https://www.fastweb.com/financial-aid/articles/options-for-a-student-whose-parents-refuse-to-complete-the-fafsa and https://finaid.org/educators/pj/dependencyoverrides/ may have additional insights.
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Dan’s Answer

I was an Academic Advisor at the local Community College in Pittsburgh and we had folks in the Financial Aid office who would meet with students and help with these kinds of problems.
I suggest you contact the Financial Aid office at your local college and ask them to provide guidance (I think a visit would be better than an email or phone call).

Good Luck and do not give up!
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Fanetta’s Answer

Yes you can put your mother's information on the FAFSA.
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Anthony’s Answer

Please, note the following :
1. Find ways and means to
discuss the issue with your
father.
2. If that fails, do the same with
your mother.
3. There may also be the need to
consult financial aid institutions,
benevolent institutions, etc.
4. Best wishes to you.

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Jessica’s Answer

Thank you for sharing. Many students find themselves in similar situations. It can be daunting but is not impossible. Hassan shared great information regarding options from the FAFSA resource page. If your mom claims you on her taxes, this can also be helpful that she is the person completing the parent’s portion. If you all are selected for verification after completing the FAFSA, they will ask for both your taxes and hers to further review. This may be necessary to determine your EFC score, potential grant eligibility, and more. Hope this is helpful!
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Zachary’s Answer

Yes I second put your mothers name and information on there, she has already granted you the ability to do so. Physically living there I don't think is as large of an issue because many people have multiple active addresses, and if its just a matter of getting mail there to do so should be a non issue. Where there is a will there is a way, but I would recommend first and foremost be honest and upfront with the financial advisor at the local schools. Questions do take time but they don't cost money to ask. There are probably more but three G's come to mind that are important GRANTS - money you don't have to pay back with interest, GREAT GRADES - gives a good deal of negotiating power, kind of like a credit score for academia, Lastly and by far I think the most difficult to do successfully always GRATITUDE, thank you letters and in person pay out great dividends and everyone knows someone that knows someone else. Life has its ups and downs but as expressed here the desire to be better and learn and add value to your life is a sign to me that you are willing, able and capable of getting it done. Help is always available its simply a matter of asking. I hope this helps some.
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