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What is the difference between the different Engineering fields?

I recently decided to pursue the engineering field but I do not know what field to go into. #engineering #science #mechanical-engineering #electrical-engineering #software-engineering #aerospace-engineering #industrial-engineering

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Todd’s Answer

Ivan,


One nice thing is that you don't actually have to decide yet. Generally, the first 2 years of engineering schooling are the same core classes regardless of what type of engineering that you do. So during the first couple of years you can hang out with plenty of engineers and get a taste of what each has to offer. Do career days with some firms. Many firms would be delighted to have you come shadow an engineer for a day and let you see what life is like as an engineer. Consider electrical, mechanical, nuclear, structural, civil, environmental, chemical, and more. Many colleges and universities also have student chapters of organizations such as ASME or IEEE where you can network with professional engineers and get a taste for what each type deals with.


One other point: you may not necessarily know what you will ultimately do. For example; I'm an electrical engineer and love it. However, I had not even a scrap of desire to work with in the electrical field as a youth. It wasn't until I was in a situation where electrical expertise was needed that I dabbled in it and found that I was good at it and that I enjoyed it. The lesson I come away with is that you don't have to do what you love if you love what you do. Does that make sense? In other words, if you love engineering, you will find joy and happiness regardless of which type you do. Keep an open mind and taste them all then the best choice just might jump up and slap you in the face when you're not expecting it.

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Minseok (Evan)’s Answer

Hi Ivan,


It really depends on what you want to focus on. So, you have to decide based on what you are interested in becoming.


In your early college life, you should try to audit some of the classes that sound interesting to you to make sure if it is a good fit for you.


For example, with mechanical engineering, you can focus on various things such as designing, analyzing, testing or even programming. It really matters what you are good at not what you study.

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Logan’s Answer

Mainly, what type of job you get at the end of the road and where that job is located. The majority of them learn most of the same concepts at this point. Also, the names are usually pretty good indicators of the slight differences. Though speaking from a chemical engineering background, there isn't usually as much chemistry involved as you might think. It has much more to do with process engineering and system improvements in general.

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Ken’s Answer

Hi Ivan!


Here are sites that will help you to understand the areas of engineering. The first is meant for girls, but it has the best description of the various areas that I have seen.
https://www.engineergirl.org/
http://www.futureengineers.org/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43zVcmTJSKM


Best of luck! Be true to yourself. The feeling and concept of success is yours - and is very personal. Let me know if this is of help.

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Ivan,

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is a vast field encompassing the creation, examination, and production of mechanical systems. This could range from vehicles and aircraft to medical instruments and energy systems. Mechanical engineers are frequently employed in sectors like automotive, aerospace, and energy, where they might be tasked with creating new products, enhancing manufacturing procedures, and spearheading research and development projects.

The core of mechanical engineering lies in applying principles of motion, energy, and force to design and scrutinize mechanical systems. Mechanical engineers commonly utilize computer-aided design (CAD) software to generate intricate models of their designs, and they might also employ tools like finite element analysis (FEA) to simulate how their designs would perform under varying conditions.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is a discipline that focuses on the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism. Electrical engineers are responsible for designing, developing, testing, and overseeing the production of electrical equipment such as electric motors, radar and navigation systems, communication systems, and power generation equipment. They may also work on the electrical systems of buildings and aircraft.

Electrical engineering is subdivided into several areas including power engineering, electronics, telecommunications, control systems, and signal processing. Power engineers handle large-scale electrical systems like power transmission and distribution networks, while electronics engineers focus on smaller-scale electronic systems like circuits and sensors. Telecommunications engineers design and develop communication systems like cellular networks and satellite communication systems. Control systems engineers design and develop systems that control the behavior of machines and devices. Signal processing engineers work on the analysis, interpretation, and manipulation of signals such as audio, video, and biomedical signals.

Software Engineering

Software engineering is a discipline that deals with the design, development, testing, and maintenance of software systems. Software engineers employ a range of programming languages, tools, and methodologies to create software systems that fulfill user needs. Their work can span a variety of applications including operating systems, databases, networked systems, mobile apps, and websites.

Software engineers often collaborate with other software engineers, designers, project managers, and quality assurance specialists to develop software products. They may also participate in the testing and maintenance of existing software systems. Software engineering is a rapidly evolving field that demands a solid grounding in computer science fundamentals as well as a readiness to learn new technologies and programming languages.

Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace engineering is a discipline that involves the design, development, testing, and production of aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other airborne systems. Aerospace engineers often work on projects related to aviation or space exploration. They may be involved in tasks such as designing new aircraft or spacecraft components, analyzing flight data to improve aircraft performance, or testing prototypes to ensure they meet safety standards.

Aerospace engineering is divided into two main branches: aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering. Aeronautical engineers focus on the design of aircraft while astronautical engineers focus on the design of spacecraft. Aerospace engineers may also specialize in areas such as aerodynamics, propulsion systems, structural analysis, or flight dynamics.

Industrial Engineering

Industrial engineering is a discipline that deals with the optimization of complex processes or systems. Industrial engineers use mathematical models and statistical methods to analyze data and identify opportunities for improvement in areas such as productivity, quality control, supply chain management, or manufacturing processes. They may work in industries such as manufacturing, healthcare, logistics, or finance.

Industrial engineers often collaborate with other professionals including operations managers, production workers, or supply chain specialists to implement improvements in complex processes or systems. They may also be involved in designing new production facilities or redesigning existing ones to improve efficiency or reduce costs. Industrial engineering is a field that requires strong analytical skills as well as an ability to communicate complex ideas to non-technical audiences.

May God Bless You!
James Constantine Frangos.
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