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How would I reach my goal if I had to stay in state for college?

I really want to go out of state for college as there's not many opportunities in South Dakota. If I were to stay in state for college, so I was wondering how I would reach my goal of a supply chain engineer, or some other supply chain job? Would an operations management minor and a management studies major be good enough, or would I have to go out of state for a supply chain management major?

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Stacey’s Answer

If the whole college experience is not important to you, you can always go the online route. More and more online universities are becoming reputable with employers who realize good employees can come from anywhere.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Andrew
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Mareysha’s Answer

Hello Andrew,

I currently work at Publix SuperMarkets. Careers in Supply Chain are in such high demand. There are a lot of online degrees for this field if the state you are in does not have many options. Publix have a corporate internship that you could apply for with this degree. They also pay for tuition if you decide to work for the company and pursue this field. I would definitely suggest to look for degrees online to keep cost down and look for internships. Most big companies will pay for housing and still provide a monthly stipend for the internship. I would highly suggest that when you are applying for internships that you look for ones with hands on training applying to the job. Most companies have internships where you are completing desk work that no-one wants to complete. I hope this helps.
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RAVI’s Answer

My answer may be more philosophical. Hope it helps.
Success in your career and reaching the goal can take many paths. One path may be better than the other depending on the situations and not in all situations. Out Of state and great colleges do not necessarily mean success and lead you to your goal. Similarly in-state college does not mean it will not. In-state definitely will help both financially and being close to the family provides reassurance. Choose the best option to suit your current financial situation and also family situation.

I am not familiar with SD colleges and universities and their curriculum. I am sure they do have programs leading to supply management degree eventually or something close to it. Operations management will definitely bring you close to it, if that is all that is available there.

1. You can do your undergrad in that field and have summer internships lined up in supply chain management all over the country with all possible employers.! Complete your degree and I am sure you will get a job with the employer of your choice and you can learn more on the job. Then you can probably pursue and MBA or masters in focused supply chain management at the college of your choice (online/in-person). Most employers still pay for it.

2. Get your undergrad in-state in a related field and then get a masters/MBA in supply chain management. I am sure you should be able to get TA/RA in the college and tuition waiver for graduate course to reduce the burden.

In either of the above cases, you do need to work hard and have great academic and enterprising skills that you can develop irrespective of where your study.

You can continue to study and learn supply chain management on your own in parallel in both cases, while getting a degree in related field.

In the end, everything is in your control. If you put your mind to it you can find a path to your goal. Just work hard, stay focused, and choose the college/degree/environment that best suits your situation.

Wish you the very best.

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Kim’s Answer

Andrew,

Would you be able to go to an in-state college for your first two years, and transfer out of state for the last 2? I don't see a lot of options within the state. Not being in supply chain, I don't know what degrees are acceptable. Another option might be to land a job with a supply chain company, preferably one with tuition assistance, and then ask for a reassignment out of state. Also, have you considered the military? They are very big on logistics. Look at how quickly they must move personnel and equipment to anywhere in the world! I wish you luck in resolving this dilemma. Kim
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Andrew
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Karen’s Answer

Hi Andrew,
This is a great question! Since I am not real familiar with that career field, my first suggestion is that you consult The Occupational Outlook Handbook. It’s a wonderful resource to describe the kind of career field you want to get into. I copied a link that might bring you to the area you are interested in:
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/logisticians.htm

Once you know more about that career field, it would be great if you could talk to someone (or many people) who is/are doing the job you want to do. This would be an informational interview. Richard Bolles in his book “ What Color Is Your Parachute?” talks about this process in detail.

Once you have identified the career you want and verified it by talking to someone who does that job, you can get a better idea of what training you need to get there. Remember—there are many pathways to the same goal.

There are a lot of factors that go into a decision on where to attend college. I recommend that you start with your high school guidance counselor for advice, then talk to colleges in your area. Start with Admissions and they can help you and connect you to resources within the institution to get your answers. These folks are all there to help you on your path to achieving your career/life goals.

I think it’s best to start locally, then expand as necessary. You might find the colleges in-state have the training you need. It’s a process of discovery and as you connect with people and ask questions, you will find your way.

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Andrew
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Natalie’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

Hi Andrew,

Congratulations on thinking about your future. You are off to a fantastic start. In terms of your career aspirations and how your college may affect that, you can absolutely find a job after college in a state that your college is not in. If you go to college in South Dakota, you can still totally apply to jobs allover the country (or the world). As long as you major in something that's relevant to a future role in supply chain engineering, even if it isn't supply chain management itself, you should be able to apply to jobs outside of South Dakota after college.

I would recommend as a follow up, you could ask another question on CareerVillage asking what the best majors are for working in supply chain management.

Good luck, and congratulations for taking this step towards your career.
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Andrew
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Andrew,

Reaching Your Goal of Becoming a Supply Chain Engineer While Staying In-State for College

If you are determined to pursue a career as a supply chain engineer or in a related supply chain field while staying in South Dakota for college, there are several steps you can take to work towards your goal. While it may be true that South Dakota might not offer as many opportunities in this specific field compared to other states, with the right approach and academic choices, you can still prepare yourself effectively for a career in supply chain management.

1. Research South Dakota Universities: Begin by researching universities within South Dakota that offer programs related to supply chain management or closely related fields such as operations management or logistics. Look into the specific courses offered, faculty expertise, and any industry partnerships these universities may have.

2. Choose Relevant Majors and Minors: While some colleges may not offer a specific major in supply chain management, you can consider majoring in fields like operations management, logistics, business administration, or engineering. Additionally, pairing this major with a minor in operations management or logistics could provide you with a well-rounded education that aligns with the skills needed for a career in supply chain management.

3. Seek Internship Opportunities: Internships are invaluable experiences that can provide you with practical exposure to the field of supply chain management. Look for internship opportunities at local companies, manufacturing firms, distribution centers, or logistics providers within South Dakota. Gaining hands-on experience will enhance your resume and give you a competitive edge when seeking full-time employment after graduation.

4. Network Within the Industry: Even if South Dakota does not have as many opportunities in supply chain management compared to other states, networking remains crucial. Attend industry events, career fairs, and professional networking sessions both within the state and virtually to connect with professionals working in the field. Building relationships can open doors to potential job opportunities or mentorship.

5. Consider Online Programs: If you find that the local universities do not offer the specific programs you are looking for, consider enrolling in online programs from reputable institutions outside of South Dakota. Many universities offer online degrees in supply chain management or related fields, allowing you to pursue your academic goals without relocating.

6. Pursue Professional Certifications: In addition to your academic pursuits, consider obtaining relevant certifications such as Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) or Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM). These certifications demonstrate your commitment to the field and can enhance your credibility among potential employers.

By following these steps and remaining proactive in seeking out opportunities both within South Dakota and beyond its borders, you can work towards achieving your goal of becoming a successful supply chain engineer even while staying in-state for college.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: The Harvard Business Review is known for its insightful articles on various business topics including supply chain management and operations.

Supply Chain Management Review: This publication provides industry insights, best practices, and trends related to supply chain management.

Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM): ASCM offers valuable resources, research publications, and networking opportunities for individuals interested in pursuing careers in supply chain management.

GOD BLESS YOU!
JC.
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