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What methods did you use/or use to memorize certain information?

This is for studying and for exams and questions.

Thank you comment icon If you understand it you do mot have to memorize it. However practice and write down what you have remembered is the best way to do it. Atul Bhankharia
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Michelle’s Answer

I love mnemonic devices - like, what are the five criteria for goals you set? Remember SMART -
Specific,
Measurable,
Attainable,
Realistic,
Time-bound/timely.

I create these easy-to-remember tools for all sorts of things to help me remember them.

Also, think about associations you can make. You meet a man with red hair. His name is Robert. In you mind, maybe you remember him as "Red Robert." Just don't call him that :)
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Pamela’s Answer

A. When I took notes I left a column to the right where I could write questions to answer about the content. I tried to show you but this program messed it all up. LOL Simply draw a line down the left side of your paper about 1/3 of the way in. Take notes on the other side. Notes could be:

A dog is a member of the canine family. It is also a mammal. It has live births and feed its young milk. There are many breeds of all kinds of sizes. More recently there are mixed breeds as well that have become quite popular.

I would take notes here on the right side only leaving a space to the left for my
questions. Then I would reread my notes make questions for study later on. Easier than recopying it all onto note cards. Questions can be derived from your
syllabus or just what you think will be important. Your question to the left may be What is a canine? What do dogs feed their young? As you study cover the notes and look only at the questions. When you know most of them copy ONLY the ones you need to practice onto note cards to review them or you can highlight.

B. Another strategy is to draw a picture of what you need to learn. This is quite basic but, for example you could draw many dogs with some nursing their young. Name one Canine. Name another one mammal. Write their names on a tag on their collar or whatever helps you to remember the content. By thinking about drawing it all you are helping put the information into long term memory. You can color main points as well.

C. Write a stupid song or jokes about the content. Example - sung to Jingle Bells. A dog is a canine. There are a lot of breeds. They feed their young warm milk. They are hairy indeed. Some are a pure-bred breed. Others are mixed and new. I feed my dog some Alpo and he loves me so much too. OH I love dogs I love dogs, they are cute for sure......... Get the idea? Here again processing it and making a stupid song will help you especially if you are one who can memorize better with music.

Joke? What did the canine say to the hairy mutt? You are one fine canine!

D, Draw a map of the order of things that happen. This works well for history lessons. It also works for experiments and things you need to memorize stages for. It does not matter if anyone else likes it. The purpose is for you to map things out and get them into your mind.

E. Another idea for order of operations etc is drawing a road with billboards alongside the road. Place them in the order things need to be memorized.

F. Study with friends. Have them ask you things aloud. Rehearse things you might need to demonstrate with them.

Hope this helps.

D.

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Desiree’s Answer

Hello! When it comes to memorizing I personally like to read the information, then rewrite it, and lastly read it out loud. I found the more repetitive you do all three, it helps to remember it better. Sometimes if possible, instead of reading it out loud, I would try to say it in song with a catchy beat. I found it much easier as well to retain if you sing it in your head as well. Hope this helps, best of luck!
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Sikawayi’s Answer

Hello Junior, thank you for your question. For me personally, I read the information and reread it over and over when I feel like I know the information I start to quiz myself. What I do is ask myself the question then look at the answers to see if my answer was correct. One other thing I do is ask the questions out of order that way you won't memorize just the answers but the questions as well. Best of luck
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Elizabeth’s Answer

Wow, great question. And so many possible answers!

Everyone learns differently.

For me, I used to to like to read material and take notes. The re-writing of material helped to reinforce the information. Then re-write again, each time with fewer words, less detail. I would get topics down to index cards.

If it was a list or rule I needed to learn, I would create a jingle or phrase. Something that had meaning to me
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Aneil’s Answer

Hi Junior,

What worked for me was mnemonics, as well as really, really understanding the material. Once you get a good grasp, start quizzing yourself over and over, and then have a family member or friend quiz you. This worked for me, as it forced me to recall information I needed to know and ensured I truly understood the material.

Take a LOT of notes, and re-read them to yourself. Then, you could even explain to someone the notes, as to teach them, in a way.

Good luck!
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Jaden’s Answer

Hey Junior!

As someone who has recently graduated, I found it really helpful to take notes! It goes without saying that note-taking is a method that most people reccomend, however you're not trying to memorize the notes word from word.

What I use to do after I took notes was, focus on a few key words that gave me the main point of the sentence, paragraph, etc. Since I am more of a visual learner, when I decided on the key words, I would draw a small picture of something that symbolized one of them so that it would get me an image to think of during the exam. This helped me remember what was important while also adding a fun aspect to the process.

I often found that having someone else quiz me on the information, was really beneficial. If I didn't get the answer right off the bat, I would repeat a word from both the question and the answer to help me tie the two together.

All in all, I highly reccomend that you understand your specific learning style first, since I think that this is something that can be extremely helpful. Once you find that out, you can find different ways that specifically work for you when it comes to studying and note-taking.

I hope that you find what style of learning/memorizing works best for you and try to have fun with it in the process!
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Alexandra’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

Hi Junior,

Great question! Answering this question definitely requires a bit of exploration on your part to find out what kind of methods work for you, and which don’t. You have lots of great suggestions from other Professionals, and you should give them a try to see what works for you. Not every person learns the same way. For example, I found in school that I did not learn well from reading textbooks, particularly science textbooks where I needed to memorize complex processes. I found it more helpful to watch videos about the same topics by using YouTube. There are many short & fun educational videos made by professionals that include helpful animations, additional diagrams, or tricks for remembering certain concepts.
I’m also a huge believer in the power of entertainment value when it comes to learning. This is not just true for videos (‘Thug Notes’ was one of my go-to YouTube channels back in the day!) but also true for textbooks. I found it much easier to learn from textbooks whose authors let their quirky voice shine through, terrible puns and all! Give those textbooks a chance — even if the jokes seem silly, you’ll be surprised how much it helps retain information when the author keeps it light, so to speak. Lastly, creating games for yourself with the information is a huge help. Use tools like Quizlet to help study. You get the benefit of inputting the information to create the material (which helps in itself) but you then get to interact with the information several different ways depending on what suits your needs. Gamify studying!

Hope these examples help 😁
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Jessica’s Answer

Hi Junior,
Different styles of studying work for different people - so I'm glad you asked and you're getting a variety of answers.
I learn best when I know I need to explain it to someone else. So I learn a topic, read and re-read notes, and then try to explain or "teach" it to someone else. That method sinks in for me.
Good luck!
Jessica
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C’s Answer

There are many methods to help you memorize information:
- Practice, practice, practice! Repeating the information over and over builds long-term memory.
- Use post-it notes to remind yourself of critical parts and practice those.
- Use mnemonic techniques to organize information in a way you can easily remember it. These shortcuts can help you remember the information you struggle to recall. It can be a visual picture, a sentence, or a word.
- Group related items together and connect them to something personal (i.e., phone number, birthday, special event)
- Read aloud. Research has proven that speaking text and listening to what we read improves memory.

Good Luck
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Baljit’s Answer

Hi Junior
I have memorized a lot of information in the last 48 years. I have a law degree and most (if not all) the information that I had to learn was from lectures, clinic, books and online learning.

The first thing I did is to have a quiet place to study.
Secondly, I would read everything (if not more) that I had been assigned to read by the professors. I would then make my notes as a went along reading the material. It's important to make notes as your go along, otherwise you might forget what you read.
Thirdly, I would read the notes and make any changes. If I already knew that material I would make my notes more condensed.
Fourthly, I would make flash cards or just a plain piece of paper and make notes from the original notes. It all depends on whether I know the material. If I don't know the material I would make longer, more detailed notes.
Fifthly, I would regurgitate the notes, i.e read out aloud the notes while I cover the notes up. If I remembered what I wrote I would move onto the hard stuff. I would also write down on paper what I have remembered ( just like an exam question that I have to answer).

I hope this helped!
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Kim’s Answer

Junior,

Memorizing is a special form of learning. I also like mnemonics. I also like visual aids. A simple example is a circle used to demonstrate fractions. I've known people who wrote poems or songs. Seriously!

I think that truly understanding the underlying concepts is a big part of memorizing. For example, if you did not understand the role of numerator and denominator, a circle might not help you to grasp fractions!

Playing games also helps. At one time I was able to identify every country in the world on a map, all from a simple game we played in Social Studies.

Also, please try to do your studying during times when your brain is fully alert, set distractions aside, and take frequent breaks. Proper diet, exercise, sleep, and hydration are all important.

Good luck to you!
Kim
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