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How would you describe your journey of becoming a registered nurse or medical assistant?

describe the journey it took to get where you are, struggles, accomplishments, achievements, the school you attended, courses you took, and personal stories.

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Eric’s Answer

Greetings Neftali, I think this is the second time I am writing to you lol 😀
But my journey has been now completed and I’m retired. I was in the army as a tank driver I got involved with nursing because of the death of my father. So I am a believer in Christ and attempted to treat everyone with love. Love and healing go together as the love of Christ is in us we are to connect and spread his love. I found nursing gave me purpose to attempt to comfort others who are or were suffering in pain and facing death. You will find out a lot about your self and your own self actualisations. You will find out how human we are and life is precious.
I found out my weakness and strengths as a human being that attempted to provide comfort with what God allowed me to do.
The long midnight to early dawn studying and working as an LVN
Until I graduated from SJSU. I had a family to support so I could only take 2 courses a semester so it was at a snail pace. I didn’t have a computer
I typed out my paperwork on a type writer. So to make sure I was following the typing APA it was tedious but I did it. Long work nights and then off to school after work. Some times I would only get an hour and a half for sleep. It depends upon how much you want to do anything.
It’s not easy but if you have faith in God you can do anything.
Just a thought.
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Kathleen’s Answer

My journey started out a little strangely: I really did not know what I wanted to do when I went into the Community college's admissions office! All I knew was, after working a typist job for 2 years after graduating high school, I simply couldn't do that for the rest of my life. When the guidance counselor asked me what I wanted to major it, I asked, "What do you suggest?" He told me that they had a wonderful nursing program, with a 100% after-graduation hire rate, so that was enough to sell me.

At first, I found Nursing difficult - you have to invade someone's personal space at their most vulnerable moments, and this can make you uncomfortable; However, over time you begin to realize what a difference your caring and nurturing attitude and attention can make in someone's life. I recently retired after being a nurse for over 40 years, and I actually miss it terribly! I have worked in Pediatrics, Pediatric ICU, Home Health, Adult ICU, Recovery Room, and Primary Care. You can never be bored in Nursing, there are so many different specialities to work in. You will also always be able to find a job. I still gets emails and texts from numerous places offering employment. The pay is pretty good, as well. Go for it, you won't regret it!
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Angela "Angie"’s Answer

This is my journey!

I started in high school attending a vocational school my Junior & Senior year, studying Nurse Assisting/Medical Assisting. During my senior year, I tested & became a Certified Nurse Assistant. I worked my entire senior in high school at a nursing home, full time 3-11pm & attended classes in the morning. This is what got me started in the medical field.

Right after graduation, I attended a School of Phlebotomy ( learned to draw blood) and that landed me my first job in the hospital. I spent several years working as a Lab Tec/Phlebotomist, then transferred to work as a Health Unit Coordinator (basically a unit secretary, but I also watched cardiac monitors too) This was all on the job training/paid for. I stayed in this position for several years before applying to nursing school. I was accepted into my hospital's school of nursing= free tuition in exchange for a contract to work 2 years as a RN after school. This was huge, as I was paying for all my own schooling to begin with.

It wasn't easy, but I managed to attend school Full-time during the day, and work full time at night as a Nurse Aide in the same hospital I was going to school at. So basically I lived at the hospital most of the time! * I was single, no kids*

After graduation, I was accepted into the Critical Care Internship, which was a paid internship as a RN, working on the various ICU's & some classes. Following this, I was offered my 1st choice job working on the CVICU ( Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit).

By going to a school that offered Free Tuition in exchange for only 2 years of work was a no-brainer for me. I still had to pay for all my books, fees, parking, food, etc. But all my classes were covered & I graduated with an Associates Degree in Nursing.

Best of Luck! There are so many opportunities in the medical field when you become a RN! I wish I would have gone straight out of high school, but couldn't afford it right way. But slow & steady, I finished.
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Evelyn’s Answer

Good afternoon, Naftali.
In the medical field, it can be such a joy, but at the same time, it can be stressful. Whether you're a nurse, a doctor, or even a health aid, it can positively and negatively impact you. Remember, people, whether young or old, people are sick, and they are desperate for some kind of relief. And when one patient becomes rude, it isn't because you did something wrong. It is because they are in pain! We don't know the degree of pain they are experiencing, but nonetheless, they are in pain. Try to be supportive, ask if they need an extra blanket or a pillow, and the remote control offer to call a family member or hand them a magazine. Something to take their mind off of whatever is bothering them. And remember, never, ever let anything negative or nasty that they say to you get the best of you. You are there to help make things a little easier for all involved, that includes YOU. When you share your positivity with your coworkers and how you overcame a lousy situation with something good, you'll find that your job isn't as bad as you thought it might be.

Evelyn recommends the following next steps:

Share positive experiences
Sing happy songs
Smile often because smiling is contagious
Always greet the patient, even if she/he isn't yours.
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