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Would you recommend becoming a commercial pilot?

which aspects of your job is your favorite? Which aspects of your job do you not like?

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Kevin’s Answer

Becoming a commercial pilot is a very rewarding career. Having said that, to succeed one must be passionate and dedicated. it is a long road to the left seat of a commercial airliner. To begin with, learning to fly is expensive and time consuming, entry level flying jobs historically do not pay all that well. If one is willing to except that, and stick with it, the outcome is a rewarding and satisfying career. The pros of commercial flying are many, traveling to different locations across the globe, meeting great people, getting a decent amount of time off to pursue your other interest, being able to build a secure retirement. The cons, you will work weekends, holidays, miss special occasions, sit on reserve, spend endless hours sitting around airports and hotels. In the beginning you will be told that you are not qualified, and overqualified for specific positions. Personally, I flew pipeline patrol, corporate, and for a part 121 carrier. It was a a difficult journey, but definitely one I would do again. if flying is what you really want to do, don't let anyone tell you that you can't. Stick with your dream!
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Wayne’s Answer

I would recommend becoming a Commercial Pilot, but at the same time I would recommend you have a backup plan.
Requirements for the ATP (Air Transport Pilot) License.
A. Pass a 1st Class Physical every 6 months to maintain your ATP (Air Transport Pilot) License. The following website will give you more information about a 1st Class Medical: https://www.osmaviationacademy.com/blog/faa-first-class-medical-requirements-for-pilots.
B. The airline you work for will usually require flight test in the simulator every 6 months or so.
C. Fly right seat (co-pilot) for a few years to acquire the airlines experience level.
Other Items:
A. Cost of flight training is pretty expensive. Once you get a Commercial License you can get paid to fly. You can check with the flight schools in your area, they all have a brochure that shows the cost break down to acquire the various licenses.
B. If you get your Pilots Certificate through a College - you will probably get some type of degree, with your license, (Aviation Management, etc.)
C. You might be on "Stand-By" or "On-Call" status for a few years, You will be "called" to report for work if a pilot scheduled for the flight cannot fly. This usually requires you to be able to report for duty within 2-3 hours after you are called.
D. You will be gone for 3 to 4 days at a time, living in different hotels.
E. By FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) you can only fly about 100 hrs a month and 1000 hrs or so a year.


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Mike’s Answer

There are other paths to becoming a commercial pilot as well. The military, especially the Air Force and Navy (in terms of relative opportunities), are great resources--if you are accepted to pilot training, most of your training, qualifications, and experience (hours) will be paid for. In return, you owe the Service a commitment (Air Force is 10 years after you graduate from pilot training)--but you'll spend a similar amount of time building up your experience on the commercial side. There is also a level of rigor and experience that in generally associates with military aviation, and while that doesn't get you an extra $, it does make you about as marketable as you can be.

Mike recommends the following next steps:

Explore your options with a flying school
Explore your options with a regional carrier
Explore your options with a military recruiter (don't forget your local Air National Guard!)
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Dr’s Answer

Hi Cecilia! I'm not a pilot but as a flight attendant I work with them all the time. If you have the passion for flying and can afford it, definitely go for it! If you can't afford it, then first get a job as a flight attendant. Like this you're very close to the job and you can still pursue the dream of becoming a pilot. I met and personally know a few flight attendants that are studying to become pilots or have already become pilots. Also, as far as I can remember, pilots are always in need and airlines are always looking for hire new ones -- in other words, you will likely get hired quickly once qualified. Becoming a flight attendant first is also a good idea because it will introduce to the world of inflight crews as their lifestyles are similar. Who knows, maybe after becoming a flight attendant you'll change your mind about wanting the lifestyle or perhaps you'll want to stay as a flight attendant. And if you're destine to become a pilot, being a flight attendant would be a great stepping stone to get you there. It's a winning scenario no matter how you look at it!
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David’s Answer

Yes! Very high demand currently and recent reports showed the industry is providing a lot of incentives and training to fill current gaps. Could be a perfect opportunity for you.
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Ishtiaq’s Answer

To become a commercial pilot is a great qualification and a rewarding career, but the training is expensive and the path to become an Airline Pilot is long and needs dedication/ persistence. So, I will advise that it should be aimed at by those who are dedicated and really passionate about flying.
What I liked about it was that if one is good and competent at his/her job, he/ she feels satisfied and is appreciated by the coworkers which results in the job satisfaction. The financial compensation too is good. I liked travelling and got to travel to destinations which are only dreams for most of the people not in this profession.
What I did not like was (at times) the demand of flying schedules which involve long wakeful nights and the time away from family even at special occasions.
(Refer to my earlier advice about real passion for flying and accepting what comes with it)
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Aftab’s Answer

The time to start a career as commercial pilot couldn’t be more opportune now. Covid crisis and uncertainty has forced many airline pilots to go into retirement and there is going to be a shortage of commercial pilots in coming years which will allow new pilots get into new jet airplanes faster than ever before.
Every flight is a new experience and you need to be genuinely interested in your profession.
First qualification needed is PPL private pilot license, then CPL commercial pilot license and then ALTP Airline Transport Pilot License.
You need a good eye sight, good health and quick response and urge to travel.
But be ready to miss being with your family during Christmas and other holidays. Good Luck
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