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Is learning how to be a nurse less stressful than any other job in the medical field?

I know there are different types of nurses but is it less stressful to learn how?

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Shannon’s Answer

the stress level is unique to each person. just before an exam, most students will have a high level. those who haven't studied will have even more than that. those who studied a lot will feel stress that's under control. in real life as a nurse, you'll feel the same things. you'll feel stress - like a higher level of paying attention & acting quickly, but not out of control. studying in school is the key; then you have to keep reading journals to keep on top of new developments. with more experience you'll find yourself more calm with very sick patients because you've seen it all before.
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Sue’s Answer

Good morning. I have been a nurse for 42 years. I am so glad I pursued nursing. I almost flunked out the very first semester but realized that I had to put my own work into the degree. I only felt high stress when I didn’t study and work to my abilities.
I think you will find that stress is a part of any learning you do, regardless of what you do.
Stress follows our humanity and we get to decide what that looks like day to day.
Good luck in your endeavors.
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david’s Answer

Hi, Irah,
First, I was never in the medical field, but I can give some advice from my life experience. And that is, there is stress in learning all positions. The desire to succeed or excel is present, the topics are all new, and the fear of failure is ever present. And all of that is good. I encourage you to welcome and embrace the stress you feel, as that is a signal of how important you see what you are doing. If you were to switch career directions to become a doctor, or a long-distance trucker, or an X-ray technician, you would feel the stress of achieving the goal to success. This stress is self-generated and is a way that our inner self pushes us forward. Good luck in your pursuits.
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Annie’s Answer

Hi Irah,

That's a great question! Getting a Bachelor's in Nursing is a rigorous process. It consists of four years of full-time schooling with classes ranging from anatomy and physiology to pharmacology to nursing research. It is a stressful and time-consuming process, and most nursing schools require you to get above 73% to pass the class; anything below is considered failing and you will have to retake the course. There is also the option to get an associate degree instead of a bachelor's, this takes two years. However, it will be harder to get a nursing job as many hospitals are phasing out careers for nurses with associate degrees. Some hospitals will financially assist you in getting your bachelor's degree if you are working with an associate's degree. Once you get your degree, you will have to complete the NCLEX, it is a test you must pass before you can get your nursing license.

There are many different types of nursing, some more stressful than others, but all nurses must do the same schooling and pass the NCLEX before starting their careers.

I know this sounds daunting but becoming a nurse makes it all worth it. Nursing has allowed me so many opportunities to travel and try all different specialties. Many schools have tons of resources to help you get through nursing school, if you set your mind to it I'm sure you can do it!

Hope this helps,
Annie
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Hava’s Answer

Nursing can be very stressful but there are many types of nurse you can be. Stress can come in different forms. There is academic stress in getting through school, but the workplace stress is probably trying to meet the demands of taking care of patients in settings where there may not be enough staff. The level of stress varies greatly though... in my mind probably the most stressful would the ICU or Emergency Department, but working in an oncology infusion clinic or GI clinic might be less stressful. The operating room is another environment that some might find stressful but others might feel very zen in, depending on your personaliry. Or you can even be a hospice nurse and visit people in their homes. There are so many options, although some might require additional training.
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John’s Answer

Hi Irah - Like another commenter, it really depends on the individual. Only you know what kinds of things get your stress levels up. I went to nursing school after being a paramedic, and so while some things were different because of the role, a lot was the same and as a result it was a much easier experience for me than many of my classmates. But if you feel like you have the interest and want to explore it, then go for it. I have never for a minute regretted my decision to become a nurse. The first nursing job I got out of school, the rate of pay was double what I was being paid as a paramedic. As for the types of nursing roles, one of the best things about being a nurse is that you can move and try different roles and departments fairly easily. In 25 years, I've worked in ER's, ICU's, in supervisory / managerial roles, and have spent the last 10 years working in the insurance industry in a work from home position. The opportunities are endless and the healthcare system in the US will always need nurses. We have not had enough nurses for more than 30 years and since Covid, nearly 20% of all healthcare providers have left the industry, which will mean that the opportunities will only continue to grow over your lifetime.
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