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How did you choose your college?

To seniors who have just committed to your college, or to others that have in the past, how did you decide which one to commit to?

In terms of priority, which factors were more important, i.e. what were the deciding factors?

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Paul’s Answer

For me it was all about resources and geography.

The school that I chose was about two miles away from where I lived. This allowed me to stay at home and travel easily to the college, thus saving on money, which could then be used for books, tuition and classes.

It was all about the Opportunity Costs. Basically, if I had attended a college far away, I would have had to give up something. Which means it would have been harder to afford books and other class necessities, because I would have had to divert those funds into housing and meal plans..etc

The college I chose had a lot to offer in regards to scholarships and other finamcial assistance. This again enabled me to place funding into areas of my education, which allowed me to complete a degree more efficiently, than at a college out of town.

Matter of fact, the choices I made, in regards to staying close to home, enabled me to complete my degree, much faster than others, who came from other parts of the state, and were required to find housing and divert their funding into areas outside of their actual classes and education.
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Carol’s Answer

When working with both of my kids we started with things like: 1) how far do you want to be from home, 2) what do you think you want to study/related to your interests - making sure the college offered what you want to pursue, 3) what type of campus (in a large city, in a small town)
They built a list and we started visiting those campuses both on our own exploring casually by just walking through or drive around the campus on the weekend and then if they liked the campus feel, we would do the tour offered by the school. Finally, if after the campus tour they wanted to learn more we would set up an appointment to talk one on one with the admissions team. They are so very informative. Helping my kids through this processes recently, we found their gut feeling about the campus and casual conversation with other potential students they met on the tours was very helpful. If you are going to move on to a campus you want to feel comfortable and be able to explore and meet me people. Getting engaged with social clubs was important for both of my kids as well and most college will list out the current social clubs on their websites. Good luck with your explorations.
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Joseph’s Answer

Really, I didn't it chose me. :-) I started with Physical Education because I played sports. After switching schools, I figure Management Information Systems as it was new. Eventually I found it to be a challenge and the people I met in the class were interesting, so I began to enjoy College. Key word, ENJOY.
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Jyoti’s Answer

I knew what subject I wanted to study and what degree I wanted to have once I graduated. I selected the highest ranked college for my specific major. You want to be sure you attend only an accredited university, and you should find out the job placement rates as well.
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Charlie’s Answer

I decided to start my college education by pursuing an associate's degree in general studies at my local community college. The tuition there was a fraction of the cost compared to other colleges, and they had a credit transfer agreement with the university where I planned to pursue my bachelor's degree program.

I figured it made the most sense for me to start at the community college first and complete all of my core courses (such as math, English, history, and science) at a fraction of the cost, while also obtaining my associate's degree in the process. Luckily, I already knew the bachelor's degree program I wanted to transfer to, so I was able to ensure that every course I took at the community college would also count towards my future degree.
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