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Is it worth it to go into medicine? I've seen many issues when it comes to pay, burn out, administrative issues, abd just overall a workplace/balance that is not sustainable nor worth the effort? What are your thoughts on the current treatment of doctors post covid and if the shortage of doctors is due to any specific reason? Thank you!

I just finished my freshman year on the premed path.

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Ariel,


Is it worth it to go into medicine?

{It Is if you use orthomolecular medicine God's pharmacopeia not the the organic chemist's drugs from the laboratory. The vitamin E the rubbish they make in the in the laboratory is a mixture of dextro and laevo right handed and left-handed molecules and is not clinically effective. Take vitamin E that is natural, clinically effective and has four tocopherols and four tocotrienols.}

Entering the field of medicine is a significant decision that requires careful consideration of various factors. While the medical profession can be incredibly rewarding and fulfilling, it also comes with its challenges. Here are some key points to consider when evaluating whether pursuing a career in medicine is worth it:

Passion and Purpose: One of the most important aspects of choosing a career in medicine is having a genuine passion for helping others and making a positive impact on people’s lives. If you have a strong desire to contribute to the well-being of others and are committed to lifelong learning and growth, then pursuing a career in medicine may be worth it.

Financial Considerations: It is essential to acknowledge that becoming a doctor requires a significant investment of time and money. Medical school tuition, residency training, and other associated costs can result in substantial student loan debt. However, once established in their careers, doctors typically earn competitive salaries that can provide financial stability.

Work-Life Balance: The medical profession is known for its demanding work hours and high levels of stress. Achieving a healthy work-life balance can be challenging for many healthcare professionals, leading to burnout and mental health issues. It is crucial to prioritize self-care and establish boundaries to prevent burnout.

Job Satisfaction: Despite the challenges, many healthcare professionals find immense satisfaction in their work due to the meaningful relationships they build with patients, the intellectual stimulation of diagnosing and treating illnesses, and the opportunity to continuously learn and grow professionally.

Post-COVID Treatment of Doctors: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented strain on healthcare systems worldwide, affecting doctors in various ways. Many healthcare workers faced increased workloads, emotional distress, and concerns about personal safety during the pandemic. Recognizing these challenges, there has been growing advocacy for better support systems for healthcare professionals post-COVID.

Shortage of Doctors: The shortage of doctors in certain regions or specialties can be attributed to several factors, including an aging population with increasing healthcare needs, maldistribution of physicians across different geographic areas, limited residency positions available for medical graduates, and challenges in recruiting and retaining doctors in underserved communities.

In conclusion, whether pursuing a career in medicine is worth it ultimately depends on your individual values, goals, and circumstances. It is essential to carefully weigh the pros and cons before making such a significant decision.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

American Medical Association (AMA): The AMA provides valuable insights into current trends in the medical profession, including physician workforce issues and advocacy efforts.

Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC): AAMC offers comprehensive data on medical education, workforce projections, diversity initiatives, and resources for aspiring medical students.

National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH conducts research on various aspects of healthcare delivery, workforce dynamics, and public health issues that impact the medical field.

These sources were consulted to ensure accuracy and reliability in addressing the question at hand.

There is a thing I have been doing since I spoke to Lady Doctor Phyllis Cilento in 1981. She urged me to study Doctor Robert Buist's postgraduate diploma in orthomolecular nutrition, and not to bother with becoming a dietitian.

So Just disobeyed her she passed away in 1987 and I became a dietitian in 1988. Although at her advice I did study the postgraduate diploma in Orthomolecular Nutrition from Dr Robert Buist.

My YouTube.Studio site is
https://www.youtube.com/user/yimi90125/videos?app=desktop
there I teach people about what I do and what nutrition education software I have been writing since 1972.

GOD BLESS!
JC.
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Sherry’s Answer

Hello Ariel,

I have been working in the healthcare field for more than 30 years, and while it can indeed be challenging, it is ultimately highly rewarding. Throughout my career, I have encountered numerous complexities and hurdles specific to this industry, and it would be difficult to enumerate all of them in this discussion.

As for the current shortage of nurses and healthcare providers, there isn't a single definitive explanation, but a host of contributing factors. Undoubtedly, the strain imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic has played a significant role in exacerbating the issue, as healthcare professionals worldwide have faced unprecedented challenges and stressors.

In addition to the pandemic, issues such as administrative burden and the demands placed on providers have increased in recent years. These ongoing challenges often lead to stress, burnout, and can be compounded by relatively low remuneration for many healthcare professionals. These factors may deter some individuals from pursuing or continuing a career in healthcare.

However, despite the challenges and obstacles, I firmly believe that a career in healthcare remains incredibly worthwhile. Personally, I cherish the relationships I developed with my patients while I was working in the clinical setting. The rewarding aspects of the profession, such as soothing the fears of an anxious patient or brightening the day of a young child, are profoundly gratifying experiences that have left a lasting impact on me.

In summary, the healthcare field can be demanding and challenging, particularly in light of recent global events. However, the opportunity to make a genuine difference in the lives of patients and their families makes it a rewarding and fulfilling career choice, despite the hardships. I hope this provides a more comprehensive perspective on working in the healthcare industry.
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Jennifer’s Answer

As far as being worth it- only you would be able to answer that question for yourself. If you are doing what you love, then a healthcare career will be very rewarding. You also have to determine in what capacity you want to work in healthcare, is being a doctor the only option for you?

The media dwells on how awful it is for doctors and nurses, but every healthcare job has felt the effects of COVID burnout. Post COVID, the issues you speak of are real in many career fields (retail, agricultural, business, aviation). I am also from a military background. The healthcare industry is facing the same challenges (you mention) after COVID that the military faces after EVERY world issue they are required to help with.

You also have to look at the locations and the type of job within the healthcare industry. A healthcare worker in a big city hospital is going to face slightly different challenges than one in a small local community. Family practice doctors will have different experience than emergency medicine doctor.

It ebbs and flows. Right now, many career fields are going through major overhauls in how we do things. And we should, COVID was a global 'war' of the 21st century. Are you a problem solver, innovator, or visionary? Heathcare reform is a big issue to Americans. Will you become part of the generation that will conceptualize a future healthcare system. Many of the issues across career fields is that people want to go back to the way it was before. We cannot do this. We are different because of COVID, so now we have to do things differently.

If you want to be a doctor, become a doctor. As a doctor you will have differently opportunities to work in many different settings. Some will be more challenging than others, some will require more time and energy, but pay well, some jobs will be more rewarding than others and some will pay less but allow for a better work/life balance. Take all of those things into consideration.
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George’s Answer

Hi Ariel. Congratulations for completing your first year of Pre-Med! I believe I can answer your question: Is it worth it to go into Medicine? Keep in mind that I just retired after over 40 years of working as a Podiatrist/Foot and Ankle Surgeon and have been a witness to many changes. During these years both the profession and health care environment underwent very large changes. The changes affecting Podiatry have been just incredible since I graduated in the 1980's. Podiatry has become a very accepted Surgical Specialty that includes the ability to work in Hospitals and Surgicenters across our country utilizing both local and general anesthetics. In some settings we work in groups with other specialties like Orthopedic Surgeons. Residency training and Fellowships have expanded to prepare young doctors to treat and perform complex lower extremity conditions and surgeries. The work Podiatrists do in their offices has expanded also to include performing interesting in-office procedures using very sophisticated equipment guided with ultrasound, for example. In my case, helping people with foot complications related to Diabetes was very challenging and something I dedicated quite a bit of time to. This required much Continuing Medical Education to keep up with advances, new medications, wound care, etc. Being a healthcare professional requires studying throughout your career which, for me, was a way to not only increase my knowledge but also help my self-confidence. There was no time to feel bored. Overall, all the changes I mentioned that have been put into place was to make people better doctors.
The changes in Healthcare, I feel, have been also put in with the best of intentions but with a debatable result for doctors, nurses, Physician Assistants, etc. The requirements for documentation on patient charts (using Electronic Medical Records) can be very time consuming and burdensome. But, like other things in life, most people adapt to it and figure out how to keep up with it. Many of my colleagues will admit it does require extra time and it does interfere with their personal time outside of work. There are other changes that have taken place that include, for example, government and state regulations that can also produce stress, require time and are expensive. Depending in what setting you work, you and your office staff will learn to meet all these requirements.
So, is it worth going into Medicine? My answer is a resounding YES. My main reason is that there are few situations in life where what you do can have such an impact on another person, especially to make them feel better. It does not matter how simple or complicated the procedure is. You will work very hard to develop skills to make people feel better and earn their trust. Maybe you may prevent a person from possibly losing a limb unnecessarily on more than one occasion or detect a Stroke in progress (person was sent immediately to the ER and did well). I had the privilege to help such patients in my career. Is that worth it to you Ariel? Best of luck with your future.
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Hwal’s Answer

Ariel,

Congrats on finishing your first year!

I'm a family medicine PA in my third year of clinical practice, and despite all the real challenges you seem to be aware of already, I am ultimately happy with the decision to become a PA and to go into medicine. Speaking of which, there are so many different ways you can practice medicine, so this alone should open up many different options for you to consider in the world of medicine. Modern medicine truly depends on an interdisciplinary team work, and I feel that it would absolutely help to think long and hard about what you genuinely enjoy and go from there. It looks like you've considered the PA profession, so let me share the steps to become a PA, from the American Academy of PAs: https://www.aapa.org/career-central/become-a-pa/

Let me know if you have any specific questions I can answer for you.

Hwal
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