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Hello! My name is Stanley and I am a current high school student. I'm conducting an interview with any professional in the Family Nurse Practitioner field for a Foundations in Health Science Class project about careers! I have created a total of 13 questions. Comment on this post, answering all 13 questions to be apart of my assignment.

1. What profession did you choose? Why?
2. How many years of college did you go through?
3. What jobs did you work on before you landed your present professional job?
4. How can I decide if I should earn a PH.D. in this field?
5. Were you in a college program?
6. Did you have to pivot and go back to school at a later date?
7. Did you shadow another professional in the field?
8. Did you join any school clubs related to your current profession?
9. Was there a particular subject you struggled with during your school years?
10. What skill sets did you learn or gain while pursuing your career?
11. What is your favorite part of your career? (Ex: Meeting new people)
12. Do you think the amount of time you put into reaching this career was worth it? Why or why not?
13. Would you say that this career is hard or difficult in both reaching it and now practicing the profession ? Why or why not?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Alicia’s Answer

1. I chose nursing as my major because I desired a flexible career and have a deep affection for the elderly.
2. Six in total.
3. Throughout college, I held numerous retail jobs. I served as a nursing assistant during nursing school and also worked in the nursing skills labs as a student. My entire career has been dedicated to oncology nursing, even working as a Nurse Practitioner in oncology.
4. A PhD is not essential unless you aspire to a university career involving research and teaching. It's not the most clinically relevant degree as many holders aren't currently practicing. Balancing the demands of a university job and another job can be challenging.
5. I have both a Bachelor's and a Master's degree in Nursing.
6. I pursued my education continuously, without breaks.
7. Not particularly. However, as a child, my primary care provider was a Nurse Practitioner from whom I learned a lot.
8. I wasn't part of any clubs.
9. I absolutely disliked the labor and delivery class and never had any interest in working in that field.
10. I learned the importance of embracing the unknown and being comfortable in uncomfortable situations.
11. I have a deep love for the elderly, and oncology allows me to interact with them frequently. The most rewarding part is witnessing patients recover and experience life's special moments like seeing their grandchildren, attending weddings, and celebrating graduations.
12. It was undoubtedly a worthwhile decision. The skills I acquired in nursing school are applicable in my daily life. I take pride in my choice of pursuing a nursing degree.
13. Let me put it this way, everything in life is challenging. Whether it's achieving your dreams or falling short, both are difficult. You must decide what kind of challenges you're willing to face. As a nurse, starting out is tough, but it gets easier with time. Even when new challenges arise, your past experiences help you handle them more efficiently.
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Betty’s Answer

1. . What profession did you choose? Why? I embraced the noble profession of nursing, drawn by the opportunity to make a significant difference in people's lives, the variety it offers, and the financial stability it provides. Today, I proudly serve as a nurse practitioner with a doctorate degree.
2. How many years of college did you go through?I invested eight enriching years in college, specializing in nursing.
3. What jobs did you work on before you landed your present professional job? My journey began as a nursing assistant during high school, then I served as a registered nurse in medical/surgical units, surgery, and emergency rooms. Later, I evolved into a family nurse practitioner, working in clinics, nursing homes, emergency departments, and inpatient care. Currently, I impart my knowledge to nurse practitioners, medical residents, attending physicians, physician assistants, and staff at a medical school.
4. How can I decide if I should earn a PH.D. in this field? If you have a passion for academia, teaching, or research, pursuing a Ph.D. could be a rewarding choice.
5. Were you in a college program? Indeed, I was. I earned a Bachelor's degree, followed by a Master's degree, and eventually a Doctorate in nursing practice.
6. Did you have to pivot and go back to school at a later date? My educational journey spanned over 18 years, and I continue to learn every day, as is the norm in the ever-evolving healthcare field.
7. Did you shadow another professional in the field? Absolutely, I had the privilege of completing clinicals in nursing school under the guidance of professional nurses.
8. Did you join any school clubs related to your current profession? Time constraints prevented me from joining school clubs as I was working full-time to support myself during my training.
9. Was there a particular subject you struggled with during your school years? Microbiology was a tough nut to crack during my Bachelor's program, but interestingly, it has now become one of my favorite subjects.
10. What skill sets did you learn or gain while pursuing your career? My journey taught me the art of effective communication and the importance of resilience.
11. What is your favorite part of your career? (Ex: Meeting new people)The joy of seeing a patient recover from a severe illness, knowing that I played a part in their healing journey, is truly priceless.
12. Do you think the amount of time you put into reaching this career was worth it? Why or why not? Despite the extensive time spent in school, I believe every moment was worth it. The versatility of the nursing profession allows me to adapt and change my path easily without needing additional education.
13. Would you say that this career is hard or difficult in both reaching it and now practicing the profession? The field of nursing, like the broader healthcare sector, is indeed challenging, with daily hurdles to overcome. However, the rewards it brings are boundless and truly fulfilling.
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Laurie’s Answer

I have been a practicing Audiologist for the past 47 years. My favorite part of job is making someone feel comfortable enough in a medical situation that they can properly respond to testing procedures and provide valid results. Also helping patients understand how their hearing loss is impacting their lives and different things they can do to help themselves and function better.When I started college I knew I wanted to do something in speech field .Back then all you needed was a Masters degree, now Aud is needed.While I never regretted going into this field,I had the luxury of not being a hearing aid dispenser,something I never wanted to do(didn’t go for all this education to be a sales person).However this allows for a larger amount of jobs available for Audiologist s. When I graduated with my MS I was the only one in my graduating class to get a job.I never felt it difficult to reach,studying something you find interesting helps.CEU help keep you current.
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Mrinalini’s Answer

Stanley, those are absolutely fantastic questions! I must say, I'm genuinely impressed with your effort and attention to detail. You've truly given it your all, and I believe there's nothing more to add or change. So, confidently move forward with your work and remember: success is within your reach. Keep up the great work and all the best to you!
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