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How can a student manage living a college life style while simultaneously working and keeping up with day to day living?

Moving out of my parents house is scary and I can get anxious about the unknown. There is A LOT of unknown.

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Emina’s Answer

Hi Vivianna,

Fantastic query! I can totally relate to your situation as I had the same feelings when I was wrapping up high school and contemplating heading to college that autumn. Looking back, I'm profoundly thankful for my college journey.

Firstly, it's a good idea to compile a list of essentials you'll need to take along to college. Have you decided where you'll be staying - in a dorm, off-campus, or perhaps at home while attending college? Once you're there, just take each day as it comes. You'll naturally develop a routine that works best for you.

I didn't rush into getting a job immediately. Instead, I allowed myself a semester to adjust to the new environment and understand the rhythm of college life. Later, I found employment both off and on campus.

Remember, every other freshman is navigating the same uncharted territory as you. The faculty is aware of this and there's plenty of support available on campus once you arrive. Maintain an optimistic outlook and all your uncertainties will be resolved in due course. There's no need to worry - embrace this exciting journey! It'll fly by quicker than you think!

Wishing you all the best!
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George’s Answer

What's the big hurry to move out?

IF you need a college degree, ALWAYS.... 1st - local community college for two years - they're the same credits but MUCH LESS expensive - and easier to juggle work & school while parents are helping to support you, 2nd - then transfer to the IN-STATE University to finish Bachelor's degree. You'll save a ton of money this way. Less need for work if you're not spending as much. IF you end up with student loans, the career field you choose had better have the income to justify the debt load - AND the ability to pay it back as fast as possible.

A rather successful lawyer friend of mine one said, "Live like a lawyer in college (rich). Later, you'll live like a college student (poor). Live like a college student in college (poor). Later, you'll live like a lawyer (rich)." There's plenty of fun and awesome experiences to have while in college without spending a lot of money.

Manage time well. Don't schedule based on when work is due. You'll always be behind and pressured with the next deadline. Rather, follow a set schedule of X hours of classes, Y hours of study & assignments, Z hours of work, A hours of personal life, and B hours of sleep. "A dream without a written plan is just a wish! Write down your schedule and live with it!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Vercetti
Thank you comment icon Hi George, this is good financial advice for many, but imagine if this student didn't have family support and needed to work. Would your advice be different? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
Thank you comment icon In no way did I intend to exclude work. I believe work should be part of any / all education plans. Research proves the benefits: better time management, higher GPA's, job skills / resume development, higher graduation rates in fewer months. George Katsinis Jr. - AFC®
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Elizabeth’s Answer

You'll find your balance along the way. Prioritize your health and make sure you get enough sleep. With a lot to balance, you may not have the same experience as the people around you. And that's ok, but you have to do your best to not compare and live YOUR life. Set your priorities and stick to them. Enjoy the journey. We are often so worried about the destination we forget to have fun along the way. Life is short, so live it to the fullest!
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Iman’s Answer

In this case, prioritizing is essential. You need to really think about what your priorities are going into college and let those priorities guide your schedule and planning. Is your priority to make friends and settle into a new friendship group? Is your priority to find a job and start earning money? Is your priority to rush and join Greek life? Once you know what is most important to you, you will allow yourself to focus on that and then gradually incorporate more responsibilities as time goes on. I would suggest to allow yourself a transition semester. A semester where you allow yourself to live without a set schedule, prior commitments (e.g. a job, volunteering) and to just try everything. New friends, new hobbies, new events - the first semester is all about exploring and finding what is right for you and then the rest will fall in place!
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Carol’s Answer

Great question - my daughter relied on the guidance of her college guide at the University she attended. They helped her create a schedule and plot out social time to help find the balance. Don't forget to schedule time to relax and take care of your own personal health along the way. Set priorities and if you work well with a planner, use a book planner to keep a calendar of classes, due dates, social events, etc. Enjoy your experience but accept the help the colleges will offer to you. Good luck!
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Lucas’s Answer

I somewhat disagree with George's answer. Your decision on where to attend university (or even whether or not to at all) should not be propagated simply based off of financial status. College is a unique time in your life, when you live next to other people your age and with the same interests as you, with lots of time to explore and have fun. Once you graduate, or once you get a full time job, this essentially becomes impossible. Take as much advantage of your college aged years as possible. Obviously do not 1) plunge yourself into irreparable debt or 2) neglect your studies, as that's obviously what you came there for, but don't be afraid to live a little. You can't put a price on good memories. Again, I'm not advocating an overly luxurious and extravagant lifestyle, but living like a hermit for possibly the most exciting four years of your life is not something that I personally would want. However, to each their own. I hope this helps a little bit.
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Patricia’s Answer

It is difficult to manage but with enough planning and prioritising well, it is achievable. Your well-being should be your main focus here so ensure you work out, eat healthy, sleep 7 hours and do things for self care (as much as possible) to ensure you can excel in college and work.

In regards to college, meticulously plan out your day, keep on track of all assignments, deadlines and exam dates. I used to study on the way to work and after work on the weekends. I would only have college four days a week, and worked three days a week and I was able to manage it. It is absolutely do-able! One warning is you have to be strict with your time, cut out non essential things (especially close to exam time) such as social media or reality TV.
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