Skip to main content
6 answers
7
Asked 301 views

For film majors, what did you struggle the most when taking classes for it?

Are there any interesting experiences with fellow film majors? Any heads up before I should take it or things that you wish you did or knew sooner before majoring in it?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

6 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brenda Carolina’s Answer

Hi! I think, for me, it was not knowing much information and handling of each orientation/each film major they have. I entered to film school thinking I wanted to become a animator, which lead to do the basic animation subject (that I didn’t like), which lead to try the first production level (that hasn’t convinced me). Finally, I did the first script level and liked it so much. Now, I’m taking classes of the third level.
So, I’m resume, basically it’s about knowing what’s about the major, since the material of class till the the opportunities in which you can develop with that major. For example, when I was doing the first script level a teacher told us that you can be a sport journalist with the knowledge.

I hope it helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Terry’s Answer

The greatest challenge for me in the early 80's was making connections in the industry, when you're at a school that has no film industry right next to it or close enough to camp yourself into helping out with any productions. This is the only way to ensure you can do something with your education once you leave it.

Approach your schooling like it is your job where instead of you getting paid, you are paying the company to be there, because you are. The educational system in the US is backwards from the get-go: all students should already be working for a company in their field when they are in school. Students should not be allowed to be in higher education without already working for a company in their field, e.g. get a job with a local TV station THEN go to school at the same time.

Establish contacts way before you graduate and have a plan the day you start school. Also, KEEP EVERYTHING you film as it is your resume. In my day, everything was on actual film, not video not digital and thus, all of it is gone. The only thing I have left are the screenplays that I wrote for classes. So you see, things are WAY different for you and you are in an exciting time, especially with the advent of A.I.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michael’s Answer

Hi Evan, that is awesome. I'm glad that you have a real interest in film. It is a great major and you'll find it really interesting. I was a Mass Communication major but part of my assigned course of study was video production and film. I'd say for me, the technical aspects of the major were challenging at first. Angles, lighting, film techniques in general. I'd start by trying to spend some time with old films. Find ones that you really like and how they are filmed. It will give you an early advantage on what many of your courses will cover. Good luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Samuel’s Answer

Good afternoon Evan,

I would say that funding to some extent. But once I learned how to cut corners, barter and collaborate things became much easier.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jacob’s Answer

When I was majoring in film, I faced various challenges and had some memorable experiences. Here are some insights and advice based on my experiences:

**Challenges:**

1. **Time Management:** Film courses often involve a lot of hands-on projects and can be time-consuming. Balancing multiple projects and deadlines can be challenging, so it's crucial to develop strong time management skills.

2. **Creative Blocks:** At times, I struggled with creative blocks when trying to come up with unique ideas for projects. It's normal, but keeping a journal for brainstorming and staying open to inspiration from various sources helped me overcome this.

3. **Technical Learning Curve:** Learning to use filmmaking equipment and software can be overwhelming initially. Don't hesitate to ask for help from professors or fellow students, and take advantage of workshops or tutorials.

**Interesting Experiences:**

1. **Collaboration:** One of the most rewarding aspects of film school was collaborating with fellow students. You'll have the opportunity to work on various projects together, which can lead to lifelong friendships and a diverse range of creative ideas.

2. **Film Festivals:** Participating in or attending film festivals is an exciting part of film school. It's a chance to showcase your work, network with industry professionals, and gain valuable feedback.

3. **Film Analysis:** Analyzing classic and contemporary films in-depth was eye-opening. It helps you understand storytelling techniques, cinematography, and direction on a whole new level.

**Advice:**

1. **Networking:** Start building your network early. Attend film-related events, join student film clubs or organizations, and connect with professors and alumni. Networking can open doors to internships and job opportunities.

2. **Internships:** Consider internships in the film industry to gain practical experience. It's a chance to apply what you learn in class to real-world projects and build your resume.

3. **Diverse Skill Set:** Don't limit yourself to just one role in filmmaking. Explore various aspects, such as directing, screenwriting, editing, and cinematography. A well-rounded skill set makes you more valuable in the industry.

4. **Critique and Feedback:** Embrace critique from professors and peers. It's how you'll grow as a filmmaker. Don't take criticism personally; use it as an opportunity to improve.

5. **Stay Updated:** The film industry is constantly evolving. Stay updated with the latest technology and trends. Consider taking additional courses in areas like digital editing or visual effects if they align with your interests.

6. **Passion and Persistence:** Filmmaking can be challenging, but passion and persistence will keep you going. Believe in your vision and keep pushing through setbacks.

In hindsight, I wish I had known more about the practical aspects of the film industry, such as budgeting and distribution. So, consider taking courses or workshops in these areas as well. Ultimately, majoring in film can be a rewarding journey if you're willing to put in the effort and stay committed to your craft.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Hey Evan,

Embarking on a journey as a film major can be a thrilling ride, filled with its own unique set of ups and downs. Each person's journey is different, shaped by their own strengths, weaknesses, and personal experiences. But, there are a few common hurdles that most film students face, such as mastering the technicalities of filmmaking, making creative choices, and collaborating with classmates.

One of the biggest challenges you might face is getting a grip on the technical side of filmmaking. This includes learning to operate cameras, understanding lighting, editing, and sound design. It's like learning a new language, and it takes practice. But don't worry, with time and dedication, you'll start speaking "film" fluently!

Another hurdle can be the creative decision-making process. This involves developing a unique vision for your projects, picking the right storytelling techniques, and making aesthetic choices that match your artistic goals. It's like painting a picture with your ideas, and sometimes, it can be tough to get it just right. But remember, every great artist had to start somewhere!

Working with others is a big part of the film industry. As a film major, you'll often find yourself working in teams to bring a project to life. This can sometimes lead to disagreements or challenges when working with your peers. But, learning to navigate these dynamics is a crucial part of the journey and can lead to some pretty amazing collaborations.

Speaking of collaborations, one of the coolest things about being a film major is the chance to work with fellow film enthusiasts. Group projects can be a great way to learn from each other and build a sense of camaraderie. Plus, these relationships can lead to lifelong friendships and maybe even future collaborations in the industry.

Before you dive into the world of film, here are a few tips that might come in handy. First, make sure you have a burning passion for filmmaking. This field requires dedication, perseverance, and a love for continuous learning. Also, do your homework and choose a film program that aligns with your goals and interests. Look for programs that offer hands-on experience, access to industry professionals, and opportunities for internships.

It's also a good idea to start building a portfolio of work early on. This can include short films, scripts, or any other creative projects that showcase your skills and potential as a filmmaker. A strong portfolio can be your golden ticket to getting into film programs or landing internships and jobs in the future.

And finally, keep an open mind. While you might have a specific interest, like directing or cinematography, being well-rounded in various aspects of filmmaking can make you more versatile and marketable. So, don't be afraid to explore different areas of filmmaking.

In conclusion, as a film major, you might face challenges in mastering the technical aspects of filmmaking, making creative decisions, and collaborating with peers. But, with practice, dedication, and a love for the craft, these hurdles can be turned into stepping stones. Building strong relationships with fellow film majors can lead to exciting experiences and future collaborations. Before diving into film, remember to fuel your passion, research well, start building a portfolio, and stay open to exploring different facets of filmmaking.

Here are the top 3 authoritative references I used:

American Film Institute (AFI) - www.afi.com
The Hollywood Reporter - www.hollywoodreporter.com
Variety - www.variety.com

God bless you abundantly,
James.
0