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How can find a career for me when I can't even think of what I want to be?

How can find a career for me when I can't even think of what I want to be?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Jacob’s Answer

Finding the right career path when you're unsure of what you want to be can be challenging, but it's a common dilemma. Here are some steps to help you navigate this journey and discover a career that suits you:

1. **Self-Reflection**: Take time for introspection. Reflect on your interests, values, strengths, and weaknesses. What activities make you feel engaged and fulfilled? What are your core values and priorities in life?

2. **Skills Assessment**: Identify your skills and talents. What are you naturally good at? This can provide clues about potential career paths.

3. **Passions and Hobbies**: Consider the activities you enjoy in your free time. Sometimes, your hobbies and passions can point you toward a related career.

4. **Personality Assessment**: Take personality assessments like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or the Holland Code test. These assessments can suggest careers that align with your personality traits.

5. **Talk to People**: Seek advice from friends, family, mentors, and professionals in various fields. Their insights and experiences can provide valuable guidance.

6. **Explore Interests**: Explore different subjects, fields, or industries. Attend workshops, webinars, or local events related to topics you find interesting.

7. **Internships and Volunteering**: Consider internships or volunteer opportunities in areas that pique your curiosity. Hands-on experience can help clarify your interests.

8. **Online Resources**: Use online career assessment tools and resources. Websites like O*NET Online and the Occupational Outlook Handbook can provide information about various careers.

9. **Set Short-Term Goals**: Instead of focusing on a long-term career goal, set short-term goals. What skills or experiences do you want to gain in the next year or two? These short-term goals can lead you toward a larger career direction.

10. **Networking**: Attend networking events or join professional groups related to your areas of interest. Networking can help you learn more about different career paths and connect with people in those fields.

11. **Career Counseling**: Consider seeking guidance from a career counselor or coach. They can provide personalized assessments and advice based on your unique circumstances.

12. **Experiment**: Don't be afraid to try different jobs or roles. Sometimes, you need to experiment to discover what you truly enjoy and what aligns with your values.

13. **Be Patient**: Finding the right career path can take time. Be patient with yourself and embrace the process of exploration and self-discovery.

14. **Continuous Learning**: Stay open to learning and adaptability. The world of work is constantly evolving, so being willing to acquire new skills and explore emerging industries can be beneficial.

Remember that it's okay not to have your entire career path mapped out right away. Many people have diverse and nonlinear career journeys. The key is to keep exploring, learning, and taking steps toward a career that aligns with your interests, values, and goals. Over time, you'll gain clarity and find a career path that feels right for you.
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Geoffrey’s Answer

Just like others have suggested, discover what truly excites you. What topics captivate you in books, TV shows, YouTube videos, or online searches? These could provide valuable clues about your potential interests. Keep exploring and let your passions guide you!
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Amalya’s Answer

Hello Madilyn,

It's good that you are thinking about your future and trying to find a good career option for you!
You can beter understand your academic passion if you think about your main interests and hobbies. What activities make you feel better and happier? Are there any subjects at school that you are more interested in? Answering these questions, you can decide what career choice would be right for you.
Wish you good luck and all the best.
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yixuan’s Answer

Discovering the perfect career can be a fun adventure! Start by having a chat with your school counselor. They're there to help you identify what you love doing most. Another great tool is the 16personalities test. It's designed to help you understand yourself better. If you're not familiar with these options, don't worry! You can always try out different part-time jobs. This way, you can learn what you enjoy while you're working.
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Tanner’s Answer

Hi Madilyn - My advice would be to reach out to your school advisor or counselor and see if they have any resources for you. You don't have to have all the answers and there are many resources out there to help you figure out what your interests are. Wishing you all the best on your career journey!
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Nafisa’s Answer

Take a variety of electives at your high school. If you are not in high school, take a variety of courses at a local community college. Sometimes your city or county offers classes available for kids and adults. This will give you exposure to different fields and you can get an idea of what topics you enjoy.

I would also recommend asking your friends and family if they know people in careers you might be interested in. Ask if you can speak with them about their job so you can get a better feel for that particular career.

I thought I wanted to be a computer engineer and switched majors several times once I started taking classes at a community college. I also wanted to be a civil engineer for a while. I spoke to a family friend who works as a civil engineer and realized it wasn't a good fit for me. I always enjoyed math in school so I decided to major in math in college and now work as a data scientist. It's okay to try out a few different potential career paths and explore along the way.

Remember you are never stuck in one career path. Lots of people switch careers and fields, even later in life!

You don't have to have everything figured out right now. Think about the one next step you can take to exploring a potential career path.
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Dhimant’s Answer

I wholeheartedly urge you to bravely chase your professional dreams in a field that truly sparks your curiosity. Consider the wise words of the renowned Nobel Prize laureate, Professor Richard Thaler, a distinguished academic from my own cherished institution. He advised the youth to explore various industries, aiming to find one where they would be excited to dedicate 60 to 80 hours a week. That's the stage where you're bound to thrive. Moreover, ponder on educational institutions that offer courses that align with your fervor. I believe this guidance will brightly light up your path!
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Dorothy’s Answer

It's quite amusing that you asked! There are times when you believe you've mapped out your path, only to find yourself in an unexpected place. I was convinced that I wanted to be a doctor, so I embarked on the journey, taking pre-med and other related courses. However, as I was about to graduate, I found myself increasingly drawn to the world of computers and technology. After three different roles, all in finance departments or tech companies, I found myself excelling in a job that I never initially considered. The takeaway? You can start anywhere - there's no need to rush. Over time, your passions might evolve, and that's perfectly okay!
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James Constantine’s Answer

The first rule of thumb is to pursue what brings you joy, such as lending a hand to those in need. This is the reason I was drawn to the profession of dietetics in the United States. To be recognized as a dietitian here, you must successfully complete the Certified Dietitian Nutritionist program or a similar course. Although having a Master of Science degree can be beneficial, the real fulfillment comes from simply assisting others. Whether you're managing a health food store or serving as a chef, you have the power to resolve people's dietary issues and cater to their needs. It's all about determining how you can help others reach their fullest potential and enhance their quality of life. In my later years, after a 35-year career as a dietitian in Australia, I've turned my attention to aiding the homeless. With over a million homeless individuals in Los Angeles alone, my friend, a natural healer, and I are striving to make a difference.
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Afrad’s Answer

Hi Madilyn!

It's great that you're thinking about this early. I recommend simply trying to experience as many of the things that you're even remotely interested in. This will provide you a better understanding of how they are in the real world, vs what you hear or may read about. Take opportunities to do internships, site visits, volunteer, or anything that would allow you to witness employees in the field. Youtube has a lot of videos on almost any field or job, that can shed light as well. Keep in mind this is not a guaranteed formula to give you that "epiphany" that you seek, but would greatly increase the probability.

On the other hand, spend time thinking about what it important to you. What about a job or career do you value most? Money, impact (making a difference), low demanding, being famous, etc. Once you know what's most important to you, that will help you further narrow down the best career for you.

From my own experience, I studied electrical engineering but found that I did not like it. I then changed to a general major, not sure where to go. By the end semester, I decided to speak to an advisor, who simply asked what I (as a person) liked, regardless of whether or not was an available program. From that, she introduced me to Engineering technology, which I began as it piqued my interest. However, through the program, I learned about process improvement methodologies (such as Lean Manufacturing & Six Sigma)....and at this point, I did experience that ""AHA"" moment you seek! It is a great feeling indeed, and to date, I shifted from engineering to focus on process improvement full-time, and loving it!

Hope this helps, best of luck!
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James Constantine’s Answer

What are your strengths? What tasks can you accomplish effortlessly? Even if there are certain things that you find challenging, remember, you can always learn to master them with the right guidance or mentorship. Mentors, especially those who are significantly older with a wealth of experience, can provide invaluable insights. Consider reaching out to someone in a career counseling or employment position for advice. Don't forget to engage with your teachers, parents, and their friends as well. They may offer a different perspective or valuable advice. Remember, everyone has something they excel at, and with determination and the right guidance, you can excel too.
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