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how can i get better at art?

how can i get better at designing and painting fine art and becoming a artist

Thank you comment icon get supplies, ask a friend if they could help you learn but you could also look it up on tiktok there's a bunch of talented creators,and practice makes perfect addy

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Ellen’s Answer

Hi Nicholas
Good question. Wanting to improve your art is at the heart of being an artist. No matter how long an artist has been creating their art, they always want to improve. Here are some suggestions for young artists.

1. Practice. It's nice to have artistic talent, but you also need to have good art skills. Talent means little without effort and hard work to improve your art skills. So whatever art you like to make, drawing, computer generated graphics, painting, 3-D art, crafts, practice it daily. Even if it is just for half an hour; set up a time to do this. If you like to make fine art, get a sketchbook and keep it with you; sketch what you see, or just doodle. (but not during your non-art classes!). This is no different from any other art form: musicians, dancers, and writers all need to practice daily, and so do artists.

2. Take art classes in school. I know this sounds obvious, but there are kids who don't think this is necessary, or they think that the classes don't teach them what they really want to learn. Trust that your art teacher has things to teach you that you don't know and that you probably will need to improve your art. Such as advanced art skills, new art materials, approaches, ideas, and concepts. Do your best in all the lessons, even if you may not like some of them. Try to remember that you are learning during art lessons, as well as creating. An art teacher knows your work best, so ask them how to improve your artwork, or what you next steps in your art practice should be. Your art teacher could also help you focus on exactly what you need to work on, and what you are doing well. Trust me, your art teacher would LOVE to hear this question from you!

3. Look for art tutorials online and drawing and painting books at your school or local library. You can always learn something. I know that my students really enjoyed the "Draw a 100_________" series (fill in the blank with faces, people, animals, etc.), there are lots of others.

4. Look at great art. Not to copy, but for ideas, inspiration, and just plain enjoyment. Go to a museum, or look at museum websites (Philadelphia Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art in DC), all great places to start. You can also check out your school or local library for art books. Just browse and see what you like. Start with an artist that you know, which will lead you to similar artists. Museum websites often have a kids or an art students section that are very fun, so check those out too.

5. The art you do on your own should be something that you really enjoy. At this point, don't make the art that you think you should make, or in a style that you think everyone will like, because everyone else is doing it, make the art that makes you happy and feel comfortable. (Remember this is artwork you make on your own, not in art class). This is how you will develop your own style. You know the slogan "Be You, Everyone Else is Taken"? It applies to art. Resist the urge to compare yourself to other kids your age; everyone develops differently in art, and everyone's art is (and should be) different. Just as in sports some kids might have more of a knack or a talent for their sport, so too in art, but don't let that stop you. This is where diligence in practicing and improving your art skills, thinking about what you want to say in your art, as well as in finding your own art style is so important.

6. Take pride in your art and get in the habit of showing or displaying your art. Even if it just to your family or your friends or your teachers. Positive feedback is really important, but if you hear some negative comments, take them in stride; consider who is talking, (Do they know you? Do they know what they are talking about? Do they want the best for you?) and go from there.

I hope this helps! Best wishes!
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Laura’s Answer

Hello Nicholas!
So great to hear from you! I am glad that you have a passion for fine art and design to hopefully one day become an artist. The best advice I can give you to get better at art and design is to keep at it and practice as much as you possibly can (apologies if it's a cliche answer). The best thing you can do right now is keep learning to improve your skills and practice the skills that you learned, and don't be afraid to experiment. To learn as much as possible about both painting and design I recommend looking on YouTube at some tutorials and you can even join a paid service that is like YouTube called SkillShare. Some of the courses on the platform go more in-depth with the information that can be beneficial to you.

For your painting specifically, you can experiment with different mediums and explore a variety of techniques, which can help you for future projects. That's great you really love to paint, but don't be afraid to mix mediums a bit or try out other mediums when creating art. Also if you ever feel like you need to take a break from creating because the creative block is very real, don't hesitate to step away and come back to it when you feel you are in a more creative mood. It stinks when you want to be creatively productive, but you feel mentally blocked, but is so important to know when to say "I'm not feeling 100% in wanting to do art today". Come back when you are and when you do take a break, use that time to find some inspiration that could help when you want to return to the creative space. The creative block applies to both designing and painting.

As for designing, pretty much everything I just said applies, but I would also add for designing learning to use the industry standard software like Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop are a great place to start. You can always learn more software as you continue and feel more comfortable. For example, if you want to try web design at any point, you are going to want to learn a bit of HTML and CSS coding, Adobe Dreamweaver, and Figma. Another program you can use for both fine art and design is a software called Procreate, which is a great tool to be familiar with as you can create artwork digitally in the app.

The last piece of advice I would recommend is when you are ready, share your artwork on social media platforms. You can post a reel of your process with the final product a photo on Instagram, and a more in-depth look on YouTube. The point is to show your work off to a bigger audience when you are ready as this part can be slightly intimidating and scary to do, so I highly recommend you do this when you feel very proud and have some confidence built up about what you have learned so far.

I hope this helps you to at least get an idea of where to start, and I wish you all the luck in wanting to make your dreams come true; never give up!

-Laura M.
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Kimberly’s Answer

The best advice I received for perfecting my art and being a creative is practice! Practice, Practice and practice! If you draw or paint, make time for it. Creative ideas come to you at different times, at any place and any where. I often jot mine down or start a sketch. Be open to learning techniques or mediums you've never tried. Take courses. Know that you will make mistakes or not be happy with a work but that's ok. I keep my work that I'm not happy with and realize I can either redo it or include it to another art piece. I like to visit art showings & juried art shows & spaces that are willing to exhibit new artists. Have fun with it. All the best with your creative journey!
Kim
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Ainhoa’s Answer

It's crucial to focus on honing your skills. This means setting aside ample time for practice and prioritizing your craft. Look into various courses, classes, and educational opportunities that can help you improve your abilities.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Nicholas,

Boosting your proficiency in art, design, and fine art painting involves several steps that can elevate your talent and pave your way to success in the art world. Here are some pivotal strategies to keep in mind:

Commit to regular practice: Artistic skills, like any other, flourish with regular practice. Allocate specific time each day or week to your art. Experiment with diverse techniques, styles, and subjects to expand your skills and discover your unique artistic expression. The more you practice, the better you become.

Master the basics: A solid understanding of the fundamental principles of art is key to your growth as an artist. Get to know concepts like composition, color theory, perspective, shading, and anatomy. Participate in classes or workshops that concentrate on these essential elements to build a strong foundation.

Welcome constructive criticism: Feedback from others can offer invaluable insights into your artwork. Join art groups or find mentors who can provide constructive advice and guidance. Embrace feedback as a chance to grow and enhance your work.

Experiment with various mediums: Trying out different mediums can broaden your artistic range and lead you to new techniques that speak to you. Experiment with acrylics, oils, watercolors, pastels, charcoal, or digital tools to widen your skill set.

Learn from other artists: Studying the works of renowned artists can inspire you and help you grasp different styles and techniques. Frequent galleries, museums, and exhibitions to immerse yourself in the art world. Analyze the works of both modern artists and masters from various eras to gain a wide-ranging perspective.

Pursue formal education or workshops: Enrolling in art classes or workshops can offer structured learning experiences and access to seasoned instructors who can guide you in refining your skills. Look for community colleges, art schools, or online platforms that provide courses aligned with your interests.

Cultivate your unique style: While learning from others is vital, it's equally important to develop your own distinctive style. Experiment until you find an approach and technique that truly reflects you. Developing a unique artistic voice will make your work stand out and create a recognizable portfolio.

Practice self-evaluation: Regularly assess your own artwork and pinpoint areas for improvement. Identify what's working in your pieces and what could be better. Set personal goals and monitor your progress over time.

Participate in art events and network: Attending art events, exhibitions, and workshops can offer opportunities to display your work, receive professional feedback, and connect with fellow artists. Networking within the art community can lead to collaborations, commissions, and further development.

Maintain motivation and persistence: Mastering art requires time and dedication. Stay motivated even during challenging times or creative blocks. Surround yourself with supportive people who cheer on your artistic journey and celebrate your victories.

Remember, becoming an artist is a lifelong journey of learning and growth. Embrace the process, stay curious, and continually challenge yourself to reach new artistic heights.

Top 3 Trusted Reference Publications/Domain Names:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art - metmuseum.org
The Art Story - theartstory.org
Khan Academy - khanacademy.org

God Bless You Abundantly,
James Constantine.
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