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How do you know what you want to do in life?

How do you when you found the right college and how to you know when you want to study your profession

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Subject: Career question for you

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Paul’s Answer

I think for me it came down to my core values. Those family and various cultural values that I was raised with.

We always emphasized service to others, helping those obtain a better life, who had run into patch of bad luck.

So, for me it was simple, I did some self reflection and realized that my true purpose was in public service.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Paul. Christina
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Sukirti’s Answer

Hello! It's a great idea to concentrate on honing your skills. Consider exploring new areas by participating in internships, bootcamps, or volunteering. This will give you a chance to discover what truly brings you joy!
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Firstly, you may have to find out the career you have interest to determine the major and minor in the college. Different college have different strength on different subjects.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would you like to be a singer, musician, musical artist, music composer, music producer, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an engineer, accountant, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc
2. Find out more on these career and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 career you would like to pursue. The relevant subjects in the college will be the major and minor you can target
5. Explore the college reviews on these subjects and the entry criteria
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Gaurav’s Answer

Discovering your true passion can be a tough journey, and it's absolutely okay to feel a bit lost! It's quite uncommon for someone to have their path all figured out, and this uncertainty can actually pave the way for personal growth.

Here's a simple suggestion: give something a shot. If you find that it's not your cup of tea, then you've learned what doesn't suit you. But if it sparks joy, then you've found something that intrigues you.
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Racheal’s Answer

Hi, and good question.
I wanted to be a doctor since I was six years old. Now what kind of doctor changed over time, however that thought process changed so much and even when I didn't consider it, I found myself around the right person, place or situation.
Overtime, I believe this is what was destined for me, because I tried so many other things and never felt happy, yet when I embarked in any thing psychology related, I found my niche.
While some of my influences in the field are from person experience, they do allow me to be a great clinician and give to other through value and compassion.
So u propose, that you explore your life and the very thing that you find yourself in a great mood about, that bring revelations to your soul is where you are meant to be.

Best of luck!
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Christina !

The question would be how do you know ! We all come to our career goals at different times and different ways but there are some things that you can tune into that will help you understand where you may want to be.

It's sort of innate. It's sort of intuitive. It's personal, that's for sure ! Do not worry if you haven't settled upon something when you see other people knowing what they want to do. That's what causes the barriers and confusion and makes you think you'll never discover your own personal calling. Never compare yourself to others. You are unique and have a special place in the professional world no matter when you come to a decision about it.

The answer is that you will know when and what and where. My advice is to try a variety of things through social interactions, clubs, volunteer work and learning about various people's careers. Explore. Most people basically choose things that they are good at, that bring them satisfaction and that they receive positive results from. What are those things for you ? Another thing to think about is that you will spend a great deal of time involved in your career, so you may want to choose something that will be empowered with your strong drive and determination. Think about the subjects that you really enjoy in school and how any of those choices can tie in to a career.

It also may help and sort of be fun to make a list of all the fields of work that you already know would not be something you'd like to do. Get in touch with both your own personal likes and dislikes. You may be inspired by doing this.

As for "finding the right college", I'm not sure you'll have a problem with that. You can attend orientations at various colleges and evaluate their majors and course offerings. The information is available and you need to take active steps towards reading about and comparing colleges. You may want to decide if you will go to college locally or move to a different place. Decide if you want to live off campus or on campus in the dorms. These are decisions that you will have to make. Since you are worried about these things, you may also want to examine what may be holding you back with it all and see if you can overcome any barriers. You must also come to the realization that you have a choice.

Keep asking advice about college and career matters and you will come up with a good plan for yourself. There's no deadline for that. I hope that this is helpful and can alleviate any worry that you may be experiencing. Focus on mini-goals for your plans. Take it step by step.

Best wishes to you in whatever you plan for your future !
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Olayinka’s Answer

Hello Christina,

Great question!

You are not alone on this. I had similar question about what to do. Here's some tips that can help.

1. Self reflection on your strengths and what you like.

2. Try out different new things, be flexible.

3. Do a little research and learn how you can be better in what you do.

4. Seek counselling.
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Ilma’s Answer

Hi Christina ,

Awesome question! Figuring out what you want to do in life, choosing the right college, and deciding on a profession are significant decisions that many people find challenging.

Ilma recommends the following next steps:

Self-Reflection: Consider your interests, passions, and values. What activities make you feel engaged and fulfilled? What are the issues or causes that resonate with you?
Explore Your Interests: Try new things, take up hobbies, and engage in activities that interest you. This can help you discover your strengths and preferences.
Skills and Strengths: Identify your skills and strengths. What are you naturally good at? What skills do you enjoy using? Consider how these can align with potential career paths.
Talk to People: Reach out to professionals in different fields for informational interviews. Understanding others' career paths can provide valuable insights into different industries.
Education and Training: Consider the level of education or training required for various careers. Some professions may require specific degrees or certifications.
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Tina’s Answer

Christina One of the best things I did were personality and career assessment tests- Myers Briggs is a more known one. Very easy and fun way to find your best skills and strengths. Find it and others here: https://www.intelligent.com/best-career-tests-and-quizzes/ Good luck to you in your search!
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Eri’s Answer

Discovering your life's purpose is an exciting and deeply personal adventure. It's a journey that's influenced by many unique factors that are exclusive to you.

One approach that guided me is the Japanese philosophy of Ikigai. Ikigai is all about uncovering your life's purpose, beginning with introspection on four fundamental questions:

1) What ignites your passion?
2) What does the world need from you?
3) What are your strengths?
4) What can you earn a living from?

Investing time in understanding yourself and answering these questions can provide valuable insights. The intersection of these ideas will uncover personal principles like your passion, mission, or talent.

In high school, I made an effort to understand not only my strengths (technology and computers) but also what brought me joy (video games and, again, computers). I thought about how to merge these categories (How can I blend Tech, Computers, and video games?). I then progressed to figuring out how I could use these skills to make a difference in the world. I visualized how it would look if I used my skills to achieve something meaningful. This led me to the idea of creating or designing video games, which pointed me in the right direction. With this vision, I explored majors and further steps that could make this a reality, narrowing down my areas of study to Computer Science and/or Technology. This helped me focus my university search on those with strong programs in these fields and that were within my reach.

As I grew older, I realized that while I enjoyed video games and was good at them, they were more of a hobby. Although creating a game or contributing to one is still a goal, it's not my ultimate mission. I returned to the computer/tech track and began exploring professions where I could use my skills. I discovered a passion and talent for Cybersecurity and a joy in helping others. This was how I would make my mark on the world. I would use what I learned to assist, defend, and protect others from the risks of technology. With this goal in mind, I pursued these ideas, sought advice from guidance counselors and trusted teachers (don't hesitate to consult your Science or Technology teachers), and ultimately embarked on a career in Cybersecurity, where I became a Security Engineer.

Your journey will undoubtedly be different from mine, but I hope my story can serve as a helpful guide. Reflecting on these questions (and my experiences) should provide you with a starting point for your own exciting journey.
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Kara’s Answer

Consider your strengths, weakness, likes and dislikes. I would also say seek guidance. Speak to those around you who know you. They may be able to offer suggestions. It may take some trial and error to find out what you want to do. Don't get discouraged. You'll figure it out with time!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Christina,

How can you identify your life's purpose?
Determining your life's mission can be a complex and personal endeavor. However, there are several methods that can assist you in identifying your passions and objectives.

Self-Reflection: Dedicate some time to explore your interests, principles, and talents. Think about the activities that bring you joy and satisfaction, as well as those that spark your enthusiasm and engagement.

Exploration: Engage in new activities, hobbies, and experiences to gain a deeper understanding of your likes and potential career opportunities. Participating in internships, volunteer work, or observing professionals in different fields can offer valuable insights.

Research: Explore different sectors, job roles, and educational opportunities to expand your understanding of the working world. This will aid you in making informed decisions about your future and ensure you're ready for the challenges ahead.

Networking: Establish connections with professionals in different fields, attend job fairs, and participate in online forums or groups to learn from others' experiences and receive valuable advice.

Mentorship: Seek out a mentor who can provide guidance, support, and motivation as you navigate your career path.

Assessments: Make use of career assessment tools, like personality tests and skills inventories, to gain a better understanding of your strengths, weaknesses, and interests.

Goal Setting: Set both short-term and long-term goals to help you stay focused and driven in your pursuit of a satisfying career.

How can you tell you've chosen the right college?
Selecting the right college involves considering various factors such as academic programs, campus culture, location, and cost.

Academic Programs: Look into the colleges' programs and make sure they align with your career aspirations and interests.

Campus Culture: Visit the college and attend events to get a feel for the campus culture and community. Consider factors like the size of the college, extracurricular activities, and social environment.

Location: Think about the college's location and how it might affect your personal preferences, such as being close to home or opportunities for internships and networking.

Cost: Assess the total cost of attendance, including tuition, fees, housing, and other expenses. Look into financial aid and scholarship opportunities to help determine if the college is financially viable for you.

Faculty and Resources: Evaluate the college's faculty qualifications, research opportunities, and available resources, such as libraries, research facilities, and career services.

Student Support: Look into the college's support services, such as academic advising, disability services, and mental health resources.

Graduate Outcomes: Research the college's graduate employment rates, average salaries, and alumni satisfaction to measure the quality of education and potential return on investment.

How can you tell you want to study your profession/career?
Identifying the profession or career path that aligns with your passions and goals requires self-reflection, research, and exploration.

Self-Assessment: Reflect on your interests, values, strengths, and weaknesses to identify potential career paths that align with your personal and professional goals.

Research: Investigate various professions and industries to gain a better understanding of the job market, required skills, and potential growth opportunities.

Networking: Connect with professionals in your desired field to learn more about their experiences and gain valuable insights into the profession.

Internships and Job Shadowing: Gain practical experience in your chosen profession through internships, volunteering, or job shadowing opportunities to confirm that it aligns with your interests and goals.

Continuous Learning: Stay informed about industry trends and advancements to ensure your skills and knowledge remain relevant and competitive in the job market.

Setting Realistic Expectations: Be ready for the challenges and setbacks that may arise in your chosen profession. Maintain a growth mindset and be open to adapting your career path as needed.

Seeking Guidance: Seek advice from mentors, career counselors, or other professionals to gain additional support and advice in your journey to find the right profession or career path.

Recommended Reference Titles:

“How to Choose a College: A Comprehensive Guide” by The College Board (collegeboard.org)
“How to Choose a Major: A Guide to Selecting the Perfect College Major” by the Princeton Review (princetonreview.com)
“Career Decision-Making: A Practical Guide for Career Practitioners and Students” by Dr. Susan M. Ambrose and Dr. David G. Brown (sagepub.com)

Don't forget to check out my autobiography for a list of foods that provide the necessary nutrients for your brain during academic work.

GOD BLESS YOU.
James.
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Nick’s Answer

This is a very important question that no one can answer for you specifically except that you should be exploring careers that fit your strengths, curiosity and personality and that are in demand and pay well. I can assure you that if you find this personal combination you will enjoy going to work every day of your career.

The earlier you start to work on this, the better. It's possible to start narrowing the choices in high school and narrowing further in college where the education is more career oriented.

Hard work and good grades will pay off for a lifetime. The risk is that you get a generalized education which could lead to a less satisfying career which is a completely avoidable and unsatisfactory result.

It's important that you start visualizing yourself in a good career now but be flexible as you learn more about yourself and the opportunities and don't be surprised if your goal changes over time.

Best Wishes
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Christina,

Identifying Your Career Goals and Choosing the Right College:

Determining what you want to do in life and selecting the appropriate college major and institution can be a challenging process. Here are some steps to help guide you through this decision-making journey:

Self-Assessment: Begin by exploring your interests, values, skills, and personality traits. You can use various self-assessment tools, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or the Strong Interest Inventory (SII), to gain insights into your unique characteristics. These assessments can provide valuable information about potential career paths that align with your individual strengths and preferences.

Research Careers: Once you have identified your interests and strengths, research various careers that align with them. Use reliable sources like the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational Outlook Handbook to gather information on job duties, education requirements, salary ranges, employment growth projections, and work environment for different careers. This will help you make an informed decision about which career path is right for you.

Explore College Majors: Based on your chosen career path, research college majors that will prepare you for that profession. Consider factors such as coursework requirements, internship opportunities, faculty expertise, and alumni success stories when evaluating different majors within your desired field of study.

Visit Colleges: Schedule campus visits to get a feel for the academic programs, student life, campus culture, and location of potential colleges or universities. Attend information sessions and meet with professors, current students, and admissions representatives to ask questions about the curriculum, extracurricular activities, housing options, financial aid packages, and other important factors that will influence your college experience.

Consider Financial Aid: Determine how you will finance your education by researching financial aid opportunities such as grants, scholarships, loans, work-study programs, and part-time jobs while in school. Make sure to apply for financial aid early in the application process to maximize your chances of receiving assistance.

Evaluate Post-Graduation Opportunities: Consider what opportunities are available after graduation in terms of employment prospects or further education (such as graduate school). Look at statistics like average starting salaries for graduates in specific fields or industries to help inform your decision-making process regarding which college major or institution is best suited for achieving your long-term career goals.

Seek Guidance from Advisors: Consult with academic advisors at both the high school and college levels for advice on choosing a major or career
path based on your interests and aptitudes. They can provide valuable insights into various fields of study and offer guidance on how best to prepare yourself academically for a successful future in your chosen profession or industry.

Stay Flexible: Keep an open mind throughout this process as new information may emerge that could change your perspective on what you want to do in life or which college is right for you. Be willing to adapt as circumstances evolve so that you can make informed decisions based on current facts rather than outdated assumptions or preconceived notions about yourself or higher education in general.**

Authoritative References Used:

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - CPP Inc., www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip)
U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook - www.bls.gov/ooh/)
Strong Interest Inventory (SII) - CPP Inc., www.cppdsaassessmentsstudentcenterportalaccesscode=1234567890](http://www).cppdsaassessmentsstudentcenterportalaccesscode=1234567890)

God Bless You, Richly, JC.
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