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Is it better to just do Automotive engineering or do a combination of mechanical and electrical engineering?

Specifically I would do Mechanics and Power and I want to do research and development for an automotive company specifically doing propulsion systems. Things like drivetrain and the engine. Since the future is electric power, I think it is a good idea to have the knowledge of electrical engineering as well as mechanical engineering,

#automotive-engineering #mechanical-engineering #electrical-engineering #electric-vehicles #electrical-and-electronic-manufacturing #mechanics #masters-degree #research-and-development

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Todd’s Answer

Jayden,

Perhaps I'm not the one to answer this since I already spoke my mind on your previous question. However, I will say that Automotive Engineering IS a combination of mechanical and electrical engineering. It simply focuses your studies on aspects of those two things that apply to work in the automotive field. For example, mechanical engineering might include the study and understanding of air handlers, chillers, plumbing, heat pumps, boilers, and so on. Would that assist you in automotive research? Hummm...maybe not huh?

Electrical engineering might include topics like power generation plants, high voltage overhead distribution lines, radio antenna design, and so on. Would any of those assist you in automotive research? Hummm...maybe not. I'm not trying to be a Debbie Downer but only about 10% of what a person learns in an electrical engineering degree program is applicable to being a consulting engineer (what I do). In the same way, a great deal of what you would learn in dual mechanical / electrical engineering degrees would not be able to apply directly to automotive engineering. Would it still be a good education? Absolutely! However, if you are CERTAIN that automotive research is the direction for you, then my 2¢ would be to follow the automotive engineering degree program because it will focus your studies on ONLY the aspects of electrical / mechanical engineering that directly apply to automotive research. On the other hand, studying both works too and will keep your possibilities open ended to other endeavors. Again, these are just my opinions and, at the end of the day, it'll be up to you to decide.
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Glenn S.’s Answer

In general, I do tell students to find their passion and go after it. It sounds like you have found your. The other side is to be flexible and finds ways that your passion can be applied in more than one area.

Automotive Engineering is a degree that pigeon holes you for a specific industry. My only concern with that is that the economy goes through ups and downs and in a down market in automotive, it may be a little more difficult to find a job outside of that industry.

Majoring in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering or Mechtronic Engineering in much more flexible. This can be applied in automotive, aerospace, consumer electronics, medical devices, etc.

The truth is that an automotive engineering degree can be applied broadly, but having the people reviewing your resume to understand that may be more difficult.

You have 2 great options. Neither choice is right or wrong.

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Joshua’s Answer

Answer depends on what you want, I'm an electronics engineer, and also have the training in mechanical systems (My Dad was an Mechanical Engineer), I do a lot during my spare time automotive engineering.

If you want to specialize 100% in cars, Automotive engineering is the way to go, but not all the time you can work with an auto-maker or spare parts manufacturer, lay-offs happen frequently in the industry as the same industry changes a lot (from Internal Combustion to EV). If you study the 2 careers, the main advantage is that you can work in any cross-over industry (Aviation, Auto Industry, HVAC, Control Systems, Manufacturing Systems, Medical systems, etc. I do network engineering, design HVAC control systems and automotive enhancements, where there is a lot of correlation of all these careers, I say this because many people at their middle-ages make a career-switch because they got dissapointed about their career or new interests arise along the way and get re-focused
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