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What is the best technology major to choose in order to get a job at a big tech company like Apple, or Google.

I am a High School senior, and I have a passion for technology, but I do not want to major in computer science due to the intense amount of math. What other majors are available in order to still get a job at a major tech company. #technology #career-path #majors #google #apple

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David’s Answer

Hi,


I have been in the Information Technology field for 35 years and I got my Bachelor of Science in Information Technology in 2004, (when I was 44). To get a job at a major technology company such as Apple or Google, you will have to have skills that they are seeking. Seeing as they are both companies that either make or rely heavily on computers, I would recommend a Bachelor's degree in Information Technology. You may want to also take courses on entrepreneurship, as both of those companies revere that trait in their employees highly.


There is truly not much math in that major. It will also give you a familiarity with various aspects of the IT arena. Some areas are software development, networking, operating systems, systems management, and more.

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Gary’s Answer

Hi,
Good question...I work for DELL, have been there for 15+ years. I have a liberal arts degree so no specific education that helped me get the job...sales is always a good way to start at a large company, you can study business administration/management, accounting, even psychology...psychology is great for a sales career.
There are also computer/information majors that do not require a lot of math...networking, information systems, etc.


The good thing about any large company is that they always have a variety of jobs in almost any career field.


Good luck!

Thank you comment icon Thanks a lot Gary!!! This was very helpful for me, now I have a more clear idea of what potential major I want to do. Stephen
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Mel’s Answer

In my experience, your degree doesn't specifically have to align with the position as long as your experiences and your attitude align with the companies goals and operations.

When it comes to tech companies, especially Apple and Microsoft, they care a lot more about who you are than where you came from and what school you attended. Most importantly, personal skills and your ability to analyze and interpret data will be a huge factor. These are skills you can acquire in most majors.

My advice? Choose a major that aligns the most with who you are and what makes you happy and interested. Make your time in school worth while to you instead of focusing on the end goal! Follow your passions and the career placement will follow. These companies care more about getting to know you and your style --- all the tech training follows after!
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Christopher’s Answer

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Thank you comment icon Could you please elaborate on your answer? It would make it more helpful for the student Gurpreet Lally, Admin
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Mel’s Answer

In my experience, your degree doesn't specifically have to align with the position as long as your experiences and your attitude align with the companies goals and operations.

When it comes to tech companies, especially Apple and Microsoft, they care a lot more about who you are than where you came from and what school you attended. Most importantly, personal skills and your ability to analyze and interpret data will be a huge factor. These are skills you can acquire in most majors.

My advice? Choose a major that aligns the most with who you are and what makes you happy and interested. Make your time in school worth while to you instead of focusing on the end goal! Follow your passions and the career placement will follow. These companies care more about getting to know you and your style --- all the tech training follows after!
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Christopher’s Answer

Computer Science includes a lot of math because the two areas have a lot of overlap. If you don't like math, you probably won't enjoy performing the tasks of a software developer/software engineer. Being a software engineer is IMNO the easiest way to acquire an entry-level position with Big Tech. What are your options for majors? Does your school offer Computer Information Systems or Business Info Systems - or similar? But if you're in a technical position (even as a low-level manager), you're going to need software engineering skills. You won't have to be great, but you need to know the basics, and - most importantly -- be able to talk the talk.

Check out the following sites for salary expectations, leveling, and

https://www.levels.fyi/


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Heidi’s Answer

I never got my degrees (back in the 80's it wasn't as necessary), but my college classes focused towards a major in business administration and a minor in computer science. Business Admin got me in a seat, to build my skills further in various roles and industries. The logic learned through basic computer programming classes (in now dead languages) help me immensely today in process improvement projects, and troubleshooting data flow issues for our internal ERP system.

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Tommy’s Answer

There is a lot of way to get in those big company. I think the most important thing is your passion on what you want to do or what position that you want you. Then you work you way to step by step when you get in the industry. Take you first step and apply some major that you like. Event those big company also have different department. You can easy to swift you job department if you have you plan ahead.
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Bryan’s Answer

Big tech companies hire everybody because they operate like little mini-cities. Do you think you know what you want to do at a big tech company? You don't need to have a 'technology major' like CS/EE to work at one unless you want to be involved in creating the technology. So if you don't want to be an engineer or developer, you could go into sales or marketing, customer support, product marketing, product management, etc. The requirements around specific majors are less rigid in those fields so you would have more choice. The more important things would be a strong GPA and a demonstration of leadership in extracurricular activities in college.


Regarding the math, I would offer up that many jobs at large tech companies typically rely on your ability to analyze and interpret data, form an opinion and to make a recommendation based off your insights. Math plays a role in all that and while you're not necessarily doing differential equations, a solid ability to use algebraic concepts to solve problems is very important.

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