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Why do lawyers go to court?

Why do lawyers have to go to a courthouse all the time, what is an industry and why do we have them also why does our question have to be so long to post?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Rohini’s Answer

Not all lawyers have to go to court. For example, corporate lawyers or tax lawyers don't usually have to go to court, only on rare occasions.

An industry is a field of interest where all the work is focused on a specific subject. For example, Finance would be an industry where people work in banks, brokerage firms, etc. Pharmacy industry is made of companies that make medicines. IT industry makes software that for example, runs on your computer . Construction industry builds structures, buildings, bridges. Food industry makes all kinds of foods that you buy. You must think of what industry you would like to work in when you enter the work force. You must think of what skills you need so that you can make enough money to live on. You can ask these questions to your teachers or anyone who you think is doing well in their work area.

Long sentences are required so that you can describe what you want or how you feel.
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Fred’s Answer

Pretty much by definition, lawyers are involved in conflicts. Two parties disagree on something, like the meaning of a contract, or that some damage has been done.

The lawyers argue with each other about what the "remedy" should be. How much money should who have to pay to whom. Sometimes, they can't come to an agreement that both sides can accept. So they go to court. There, they make their arguments in front of a judge or a jury, arguing the facts of the case, and what the law says.

The court then decides who is right, and what the remedy will be.
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Kim’s Answer

Hi Jayson!

Wow, that's a lot of questions! First, why do lawyers have to go to the courthouse all the time? Well, in a legal proceeding, there are MANY steps before a case actually gets to trial. Let's say one side wants a delay for some reason. They need to ask the judge to take that action - a motion for continuance. Or, if a lawyer is going to be unavailable because she is having surgery. Or, one side isn't playing by the rules, so the other side files a motion to compel. In real life, very few cases go to trial. Now, given all the technology we now have, many things that used to require lawyers to physically go to the courthouse can now be done electronically. In fact, many lawyers I know who used to office downtown within a block or two of the courthouse have now moved away from downtown, where office space is less expensive.

An "industry" is a broad field. An example is "healthcare," or "education." An "occupation" is a job within that industry. So, you could be a forklift operator in a hospital warehouse or school district warehouse, or, for that matter, a grocery store. You have a skill that allows you to work in many different places, doing a similar job. Or, you could decide that you want to stay in healthcare, but, no longer be a forklift operator. You could stay at the same hospital, and become a patient transporter (one who transports patients within the hospital to get diagnostic testing, etc). Or, you could get some schooling and become a radiology technician, or work in building maintenance. You'd still be in health care. The importance of understanding "industry" and "occupation" is that it allows you to understand how you can chart your own career path, moving between seemingly unrelated industries and occupations. It is a concept called "transferrable job skills" and it's one of the most important things you can learn about successful job searching.

Questions have to be long because many students post on here as part of a class assignment, and we don't want them asking a question like, "Why?" This site is an awesome tool, and, even if you aren't super-interested in it right now, I encourage you to bookmark it, because, one day you might want to spend more time exploring it. We help students of all ages, even adults!

Hope this helps!
Kim
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