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What is the best skill to acquire How do I start a business if I'm still acquiring the skills Why don't my parents want me to follow my passion in baking??

My passion is baking but my parents believe I should go to college and get a white collar job
They don't believe in my passion
I want to understand why that is so

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Nandishkumar’s Answer

It's great to see your enthusiasm for baking and your desire to turn it into a profession. Baking is indeed a precious talent that can open doors to rewarding experiences. While it can be a bit tricky to set up a business as you're still mastering your craft, it's definitely not an insurmountable task. You can start by refining your baking abilities through regular practice, attending baking classes or workshops, and gaining hands-on experience via internships or job opportunities. At the same time, you can focus on cultivating other vital business skills like marketing, budgeting, and customer service, all of which are key to running a thriving baking business.

When it comes to your parents' viewpoint, it's quite normal for them to favor conventional educational routes and stable careers, such as those that require a university degree. They might have worries about the financial security and long-term sustainability of a baking career, especially if it's seen as less stable or profitable than other jobs.

Nonetheless, it's crucial to have a sincere and open dialogue with your parents about your love for baking. Try to empathize with their worries and viewpoints while also voicing your own dreams and ambitions. Demonstrate your dedication and commitment to baking as a career by setting clear goals, devising a business strategy, and actively seeking opportunities to expand your experience and knowledge in the field.

In the end, striking a balance between following your passion and respecting your parents' desires might necessitate some compromise and patience. Keep striving for your goals while also exploring other paths that resonate with your interests and principles. Remember, success is often the result of a blend of passion, diligence, and persistence. Wishing you all the best!
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Kathy’s Answer

Have you asked them why and listen to what they are saying?
Have a heart to heart. Only they can tell you the real reason why they feel this way.
Some cultures, if you do things with your hands instead of your head, which you use both in the baking industry, they don't see it as a career.
The baking industry is work. The love for baking and creating incredible flavorful desserts or pastries, is truly a passion.
Have you tried baking something for them where they thought it was unbelievable? Try that...maybe they need to be proven that you have talent and you are not just all talk.
College doesn't guarantee you a career. I am all for education.
Have you been to a baking expo? They hold them. There you will meet all types of bakers and products that would make your head spin.
You will meet people that can help with putting your foot in the door.
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Jaimi’s Answer

Indeed, the culinary field may not bring in heaps of cash until you've climbed the ladder to a top-tier position such as an executive chef or head pastry chef. This journey can sometimes be long, but I encourage you to savor the process. Take the time to perfect your craft and resist the temptation to rush into a head pastry chef role. There's a wealth of knowledge to acquire before you're ready to shoulder the responsibilities of being the boss.

I graduated from culinary school and grappled with the thought of working in high heat, high-pressure restaurant environment. I feared that my degree would go to waste if I backed out of working in kitchens. However, everything changed when I discovered my passion for pastry. Watching the pastry cooks in action, witnessing their joy and passion, I knew that's where I wanted to be. I dedicated the following years to learning everything I could and honing my techniques. It took me about seven years to feel confident enough to utilize my expertise as a pastry chef.

Being a pastry chef isn't just about giving orders. You're constantly tested on your knowledge, problem-solving skills, and understanding of production and operations, including costs and labor. Until you've mastered your skills in the kitchen, you're not quite ready for this role.

The culinary industry is a world of limitless possibilities. Beyond traditional restaurants and bakeries, exciting career opportunities await in catering, television, resorts, and cruise ships, to name a few. You can even take your skills abroad and work in any country.

While obtaining a degree can be beneficial, especially if your parents wish for you to have one, the beauty of the culinary industry is that it values experience over formal education. Often, a cook with a degree starts at the same level as a cook with work experience. However, the knowledge you gain in school, including kitchen lingo, commercial equipment, safety procedures, and kitchen culture, can be quite handy in your first kitchen job.

If you're eager to learn, you can gain experience and earn money simultaneously, avoiding the burden of student debt. Starting at the bottom and working your way up is part of the journey. Remember, a hefty salary may not come immediately, especially when you're trying to pay off student loans and support yourself in the early years.

Before diving into culinary school, I recommend getting an entry-level job at a bakery or restaurant. Spend a year learning the ropes and then decide if you want to further your career or pursue a degree. Many culinary students, myself included, don't fully understand what they're signing up for, especially straight out of high school. We often have unrealistic expectations of landing a high-paying chef job right after graduation.

I want to ensure aspiring chefs are well-informed before they take the leap. Remember, when you follow your passion, it doesn't feel like work. If you love your craft, you'll never work a day in your life.
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Tara’s Answer

Your parents just want to make sure that the career path you choose will be a stable one that allows you comfort in life, and having your own brick and mortar business can be a gamble. There's no way to tell if it will survive long term or not. The good news is you have plenty of time to decide if that's the way you want to go or if a different career path would better suit you. After you gain some experience in life and in various jobs, you will have a much better idea if the dream you have right now is sustainable or not.

And the skills you should acquire depend heavily on the type of business or career you want to have. So there is no way to say what the "best" skills to acquire are just yet. Your parents only likely know one way and that is to go to school and earn a degree so you can have a career that gets you a high-paying job, and there's nothing wrong with that. But nowadays other options do exist, and having a bakery could very well be the perfect option for you. When the time comes, assess all you've learned along with how the economy looks for the type of business you wish to start, and weigh your options. Once you've done that, you will know what skills you'll need to succeed on the path you choose.
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Margot’s Answer

I agree for the most part with the previous answers, but I’ll add my opinion as a chef in the business for thirty years. I have been a bakery owner too.
First, you must get experience working in a bakery or pastry department. Commercial baking and cooking is completely different from home baking for friends and family.
Second, most culinary schools do not offer degrees, just a certificate which means nothing for some positions (this as a former culinary instructor and administrator). My own career had limitations from the lack of a college degree. Community colleges have some excellent culinary programs and you can still get a degree. They are also a bargain compared to the for profit schools in tuition.
Third, you are young and often what we think we’ll want forever can change.

Get your feet wet in the industry but get a degree too. Good luck!
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Kevin’s Answer

Hi, I think Nandishkumar answered this question pretty thoroughly. I would however, like to give you a little glimpse into the hospitality business.
I started working in this business as a child, in a family restaurant. By the time I was an adult and ready to run kitchens, it became crucial to have a formal education. I was probably much more qualified , and definitely more experienced than alot of my competition . But in New York City that meant nothing. I had to go to cooking school and get that piece of paper.
I would also like to point out to get started in any type of food service as an owner, I requires a lot of money upfront. I also want you to understand that it is a lot of hard work and long hours for the first several years.
Now having said that, cooking was and still is a passion of mine. There are a lot of great, creative people in the field. I had alot of fun along the way. I spent most of my cooking career, cooking dinner. I got into baking toward the end of my cooking career. The hours are much better baking. Not as many nights, but either position you have to give up alot of holidays!
If this is your passion, then embrace it. However, they also teach the business aspects of this in culinary school. Sounds like your parents just want you to have something to fall back on. They are smart for looking out for you. Cooking and baking is an artistic expression of creativity. If you have that in you, it eventually will have to come out. I wish you the best on your journey and look forward to trying your tasty baked treats.
Kevin
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Kayla’s Answer

Starting with a question is an excellent first step. By acknowledging your shortcomings, you can actively work to improve them. Remember, learning is a continuous process.

Approach each challenge step-by-step. If you're fueled by passion, determination, and ambition, you'll discover solutions to every problem you face, whether in your professional or personal life.

Take a moment to assess your circle of influence. Actively seek guidance from mentors. Don't hesitate to reach out. If there's an individual or a group that can lend a hand, don't hesitate to approach them. Your passion and determination will surely impress them.

When you're prepared to use it wisely, money has a knack for appearing.

Utilize Google and YouTube to the fullest. A wealth of knowledge is right at your fingertips.

Remember, achieving your goals will likely take longer and cost more than you initially anticipate. Keep your expectations realistic.

Stay clear of quick-rich schemes and pessimistic individuals. Don't let anyone discourage you or tell you it's impossible. Remember, you are capable.
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JOY’s Answer

You can go to college and pursue your passion for baking as well. You can do BS in Food Science then do a baking science course as well.
I think having college education will help you have a fall back in case you change your mind or things don't work out in the future, You will have a stronger basic foundation.
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Richard’s Answer

In 1987 I had a full ride scholarship to Rensselaer Polytech for computer science... at the time a nascent but burgeoning industry... My parents were thrilled... they had bought me a home computer in 1981 with this goal in mind... but earlier in the decade, around 1984-5 I started washing dishes as a summer job and, for various reason both good and bad ( lol!) I fell into line cooking and found my passion.... my parents were NOT thrilled... I went to a small, private college in upstate NY... my parents DID help pay (half) but were not very supportive otherwise. I did not graduate culinary school, but instead started my career after one year in school and have not looked back or regretted it... Your parents worry that you will struggle for years in a low paid job in the culinary field... and they would be right, but everyone pays their dues in this business and persistence, talent and skills are always rewarded. I may not make the kind of money a 53 year old software tycoon might make... but I do make a very good living... My parents were alive to see my "success" with high profile positions and rubbing elbow with famous chefs. In the long run, they were just happy I was happy. That's the way your parents will be, too... it will be hard to go after it without their support, but it will be worth it... One day they will walk into YOUR bakery and be all smiles... I mean, if you're a good baker!
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Alwyn’s Answer

As a parent, I strongly believe that children should pursue their passions. When you love what you do, work becomes exciting and fulfilling. For example, my daughter chose to study pastry and baking at Johnson and Wales University after taking an elective in high school. Despite concerns about the physical demands, long hours, and initial low salary in the baking industry, she followed her passion. Today, she's a successful pastry chef, excelling in her career. Remember, it's important to discuss your passion with your parents and convince them of the career opportunities that can stem from it. Ultimately, the decision is yours to make.
Thank you comment icon Love to hear from parents! It's true, when your parents see how happy you are pursuing your dreams and excelling in the career that you have chosen, they can't help but to be proud and support your decision. Jaimi King
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Howard’s Answer

Your parents only want the best for you. A college degree will typically get you a better job with better pay.
A college degree will give you more options in the future. Do not count it out. Some schools offer culinary and HRM degrees. Look into one of those. Life is not a straight line from A - Z. There will be turns along the way. Your ideas are going to change as you get older. Keep yourself open and flexible. Even if you have your own bakery and you are successful. Your job description will change over the years. More education and experience will help make you more likely to succeed. Statistics show that 85% of restaurants/bakeries do not survive in business for more than 3 years. Arm yourself with enough knowledge to survive or to be able to make changes so you can survive. One thing that will make you successful is your passion and love for what you choose to do. No matter what you choose to do in life you need to love it.
I wish you success and hope this will help.
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Damon’s Answer

The culinary industry is very competitive. Yes, there are always jobs available. But most frontline jobs don't pay a lot, because the profit margins are not high in the industry and it takes a lot of employees to make it work. I suggest you look into some culinary schools and propose going to a culinary school and gaining a culinary arts degree to your parents. Work with them to find the best one within your budget and that alligns with both yours and your parents goals. This will give you the edge you will need in the industry to get a better paying job and equip you with the skills you will need to someday open your own bakery or be an Executive Pastry Chef somewhere. It sounds to me like your parents are only looking out for your best interest, so perhaps you can make a compromise with them. I wish you the best in your future :)

Sincerely,
Damon McAfee
Area Executive Chef
Sodexo-Universities Sector

Damon recommends the following next steps:

Look around on line first and be prepared before you go to your parents.
Go to parents to discuss... Be prepared to listen to their recomendations.
Sleep on it with an open heart to your dreams and theirs
Come up with a compromise if necessary and dont give up on your dreams.
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