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Going down the right track ?

Hey there, I'm going to study electrical engineering at a top university abroad (t30) and plan to take a minor in applied AI in my second year. So for this, I have started working on Python, Java, and C++ (as I have already completed C back in high school) and plan to work on VHDL afterwards for digital hardware design and test engineering. I'm sure there are so many potential electrical engineers in this group who know if I'm going down the right track.
TIA!

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Subject: Career question for you

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Constanza’s Answer

Hello Fahmida,

You're absolutely on the right path! Your decision to delve into electrical engineering and minor in applied AI is a testament to your forward-thinking mindset. It's a great way to stay ahead in the technology race and gain crucial skills in both sectors. Starting off with Python, Java, and C++ is a sturdy base, especially considering your previous experience with C. These languages are commonly used in both electrical engineering and AI, equipping you with a broad range of skills.

In addition, your plan to explore VHDL for digital hardware design and test engineering shows a practical grasp of the significance of hardware description languages in the electrical engineering landscape. Becoming proficient in VHDL will surely boost your capacity to design and simulate digital circuits effectively.

On the whole, your blend of academic courses, programming languages, and emphasis on hardware design indicates that you're making well-informed choices to gear up for a fruitful career in electrical engineering with a focus on applied AI. Keep up the brilliant work, and keep seeking opportunities to grow and learn in these thrilling sectors!
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Deepak’s Answer

I would just add some advice on regarding the AI minor you mentioned. This is an awesome choice by the way. I think you are doing right with the options you mentioned. I would just suggest that particulary for this field, you can focus more on python. Also, more than programming A.I. would challenge you to bring in clean and valuable data. So, adding some skills to clean and load data would be extra helpful. There are tons oof free courses available nowadays to assist you with learning. I hope that you will have great time learning!! :)
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Manichakravarthi’s Answer

As a student you can read various hardware architecture.. also learn micro controller programming..GO Lang is one of the widely used in the industry.. any programming language you learn .. practice the advanced concepts associated with the hardware testing or programming..
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Thomas’s Answer

I'm not sure where you'll be attending school but, in the US, a new major has emerged in the last 10-20 years that sounds like it will align well with your interests. Computer Engineering focuses on the hardware side of things (like microcontrollers, VHDL or Verilog, large scale system design, and more general programming than electrical engineering). It might be worth seeing if that's a major that's offered at the university.

From what I can tell, you're heading in a great direction. VHDL is great for the logical modeling of hardware, but don't be afraid to get a breadboard and some ICCs and work with the hardware directly. You can also experiment with FPGAs for more practical experience. A great exercise would be to make a counter with a seven segment display and NAND gates + inverters with a button. Learning the practical applications of hardware like debouncing will be helpful along with the theoretical applications.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Fahmida Jannat,

Absolutely, your aspiration to pursue electrical engineering at a renowned international university, coupled with a minor in applied AI, is a commendable decision. Let's delve into why your current trajectory aligns perfectly with your objectives:

Programming Languages:

Python, Java, and C++: These languages are the backbone of both electrical engineering and AI sectors. Python, in particular, is favored in AI and data science due to its user-friendly nature and comprehensive libraries such as TensorFlow and PyTorch. Java and C++ are indispensable for software development across multiple engineering applications.
C: Your high school foundation in C will come in handy as it's frequently employed in embedded systems programming, a key component of electrical engineering.

Digital Hardware Design with VHDL:

VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language): Gaining proficiency in VHDL is a smart move for digital hardware design. It's used to define electronic systems' behavior and is extensively employed in FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) design.

Test Engineering:

Test Engineering Proficiency: Developing skills in test engineering is crucial as testing is a key element in confirming the functionality and dependability of electrical systems.

Minor in Applied AI:

Applied AI Expertise: Merging electrical engineering with applied AI will provide you with a competitive advantage, particularly in sectors like robotics, automation, and smart systems where AI is a major player.

In summary, your strategy to study electrical engineering, supplemented by programming languages such as Python, Java, C++, VHDL for digital hardware design, and a minor in applied AI, is a comprehensive approach that is in sync with the current industry trends and requirements.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

IEEE Xplore Digital Library: IEEE Xplore offers access to top-tier technical literature in engineering and technology disciplines, providing valuable perspectives on topics related to electrical engineering and AI.

MIT OpenCourseWare: MIT OCW provides free online course materials from MIT’s courses, covering a wide range of subjects including programming languages, digital design, and artificial intelligence.

Stanford University Online Courses: Stanford University offers online courses on topics such as machine learning, deep learning, and digital system design that can enhance your studies in electrical engineering and applied AI.

May God Bless You,
James C.
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