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What majors do district attorneys usually go to school for?

I am a 10th grader planing to be a district attorney in the future, but i don't know what to major in college. #law #lawyer #future

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Subject: Career question for you

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Gary’s Answer

Hi,
Great question...I found a good website for you and pasted in some of the information below. good luck! you have plenty of time to research this and I would suggest checking with the law school you plan to apply to as well.


http://classroom.synonym.com/should-major-college-become-lawyer-1878.html


Consider Avoiding Pre-Law Majors
Surprisingly, some legal professionals argue against choosing a pre-law degree. U.S. News & World Report states that a 2011 LSAC study revealed that only 61 percent of pre-law students gained law school admission, whereas philosophy, economics and journalism majors all had acceptance rates over 75 percent. Though it seems counter-intuitive, aspiring lawyers may be best served to forgo an undemanding pre-law degree in favor of a more challenging single-subject major

Thank you comment icon Thank you I appreciate you taking time to give me an answer. Antonio
Thank you comment icon Thanks so much! Jon
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Antonio,

Suggested Majors for Budding District Attorneys

Bachelor’s Degree in Legal Studies

A Bachelor’s degree in Legal Studies lays a robust groundwork in comprehending the legal system and its procedures. This major delves into a variety of subjects such as criminal law, civil law, legal research, and legal writing. It also cultivates critical thinking and analytical skills, which are indispensable for a district attorney.

Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science

Political Science is another favored major for those dreaming of becoming district attorneys. This major imparts a wide-ranging understanding of the political system, government structure, and the process of policy-making. It also nurtures strong communication and advocacy skills, which are vital for a district attorney.

Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice

A Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice is centered on the study of crime, law enforcement, corrections, and criminal courts. This major can offer valuable insights into the criminal justice system and aid students in understanding the role of a district attorney within the criminal justice process.

Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology

Psychology is another pertinent major for those aiming to become district attorneys. This major can assist students in understanding the behavior of criminals, victims, and witnesses. It can also offer insights into the psychology of jurors and the factors that sway their decision-making.

Additional Prerequisites

Beyond a bachelor’s degree, those aspiring to be district attorneys must also attend law school and pass the bar exam. Some district attorneys may also have prior experience serving as a prosecutor or defense attorney.

Authoritative Sources:

The Princeton Review, “Majoring in Legal Studies”, https://www.princetonreview.com/college-advice/majoring-in-legal-studies
PreLaw, “Political Science: The Best Major for Pre-Law Students”, https://www.nationaljurist.com/prelaw/content/political-science-best-major-pre-law-students
US News & World Report, “What Degree Do You Need to Become a Lawyer?”, https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/articles/what-degree-do-you-need-to-become-a-lawyer

May God Bless You!
James Constantine.
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Vanessa’s Answer

I echo the other comments. You should major in something you enjoy and get very food grades. You can attend a great law school with any major a slaw schools love diversity in their class. When you enter law school do clinics. Make sure you attend a law school that has legal clinics that will allow you to do externships providing legal services to incarcerated individuals or give you some opportunity to be involved in the criminal justice system. Spending a summer clerking for a judge will be very helpful as well.

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Richard’s Answer

There isn’t one certain area that potential lawyers major in. I would choose an undergraduate degree or minor with some writing. My wife is a lawyer, and she chose History because 1) she enjoyed it and 2) it would give her practice writing to prep for law school. Once in law school, try to spend your summers at internships in areas where you might be interested. There are many kinds of law, and the options are endless. Find an area you are actually interested in pursuing based on whether you want more speaking (litigation) or more writing (like briefs). Court trials are rare these days because of mediation, but there are still some areas involving public speaking than others. Even at the DAs office, there are people who are in front of a jury, and assistant DAs that write appellant briefs. You might also see if there is a Teen Court in your area. My wife enjoyed doing that in high school. I applaud you for having a sense of your future goals. Best of luck to you!
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