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How big of a deal is location when it comes to finding a job?

For a current high school student planning to pursue neuroscience in high school, what is the best place in the U.S. to find work after college? Are there any geographic areas in the country that have more need for people in the field? I would especially like to go into research...but we'll see where college takes me!
#neuroscience #job #job-search #work #college #after-college #research #stem #science


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Austin’s Answer

Mikayla, good question. In the United States, as well as most large countries and regions, there are parts where the job market is good for your particular field of study and there are places where the job market is not as good for your particular field of study. For example, being a marine biologist in Miami Florida makes a lot of sense, but finding a job that pertains to marine biology in Kentucky would most likely be much harder to do.


The good thing about research is that you have enormous mobility and options regarding where you can work. Some of the best research is conducted at universities in various American cities. I would suggest that you first start your search for a job in big cities that have good universities, this is a good place to start.


I was an international affairs major in college and my college just so happened to also be located in Washington D.C. which made finding internships and jobs that pertained to my major that much easier. Don't waste your time looking for jobs in areas that wouldn't seem to attract science researchers, look in places (big cities) that already have that kind of talent and job market.


I hope this helps and I wish you the best of luck.


Best,

Austin

Austin recommends the following next steps:

Look for jobs in cities
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Be smart where you look
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Gwendolyn’s Answer

Find a specific field within neuro you like. Go from there.

If youre into research strictly speaking ... you should look at academic research and doing a Masters or PhD. Look at some of the NIH grants and opportunities.

If you want to be a neurologist. Go to medical school. Get straight As. Then go from there.

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Ken’s Answer

Congratulations on being interested in finding the right career to follow. The most important decision is the correct career area, the location will follow in due course. It takes a special person to enter into a specific career field and meet the demands which that career area presents. The first step is to get to know yourself to see if you share the personality traits which make that make one successful in that area. The next step is doing networking to meet and talk to and possibly shadow people doing what you might think that you want to do to see if this is something that you really want to do, as a career area could look much different on the inside than it looks from the outside. It is through this networking, that you will discover locations and projects of interest for you to pursue. When I was doing college recruiting, I encountered too many students, who skipped these important steps, and ended up in a career/job for which they were ill suited.

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might also want to do this upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
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Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
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Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
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It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
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Michael’s Answer

Hi Mikayla,


That's a great question. We can stick to the medical field with this answer. Intuitively, the large the urban population, the more hospitals, and consequentially the more work opportunities. Cities like New York, Chicago, Boston, Dallas, Atlanta and Los Angeles are all areas with a major hospital concentration. Another great area for this, and one that I live in, is the Triangle area of North Carolina. This encompasses Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill. Duke Hospital and UNC Hospital are very renowned and it is one of the fastest growing areas for jobs in the country. So all in all, the more metropolitan the area, the more likely you will find open roles for work.


Thanks!


Mike


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