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Do you feel that college is necessary to have an successful career?

#career #careers #career-choice

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kim’s Answer

Hi Destney

Ken has given you some excellent advice and guidance. One additional thought to consider is to augment your understanding of your personality traits with some insight into your true strengths. My favorite assessment is StrengthsFinder. The resulting report will provide insights into your true strengths and how they are aligned to educational and career options. This information along with the information on your personality traits will provide a well-rounded guide to your decision-making process. Your educational and career path tends to be fluid so keep your mind open to opportunities that you may not have originally considered along the way. Best of luck.

Kim recommends the following next steps:

Research the StrengthsFinder assessment to determine application to your need.
Take the StrengthsFinder assessment and review the resulting report for insight into your potential educational and career options.
Retain the report for reference as you continue on your path to help keep you centered.
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Ken’s Answer

No. The important thing for you to do is to get to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to various career areas - many of which do not require college and provide for a very good lifestyle. Here are some good sites to visit followed by some tips from my many years in Human Relations.


Should You Go To College

https://medium.com/the-mission/high-school-is-over-should-you-go-to-college-b5b6db6f6712

My Biggest Regret: Going to College

https://medium.com/the-mission/my-biggest-regret-in-life-going-to-college-ef2068f179cf

Ken recommends the following next steps:

Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .
The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
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Djaja’s Answer

Yes for me.

My college degree help me landed my first job at a bigger company (Sprint PCS). One that job, I was competing with other candidates that also had a college degree. I do not think they will offer me a job if I did not have a college degree.

After my bachelor degree, I did my Master degree without experiencing a working life first.

My advice is not to do your Master degree immediately. After you finish your Bachelor degree, go to work first. See if you like the field you study. You can always go back to school later if needed.

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Doc’s Answer

Destney people who lack college degrees are more likely to be limited to basic jobs in service, manufacturing and construction industries. While employees with a high school education may secure jobs with good benefits, college graduates typically fare better, entering higher-level careers with greater salaries. They are also more likely to receive promotions, earn raises and develop reasoning and communication skills that can be applied to their jobs.

BETTER LIFE SKILLS
During your classes, you'll often develop the reasoning skills needed to make life decisions, ranging from buying a home to helping their children choose their own college. In fact, college graduates are more likely to have children who also complete a college education. Other advantages of educational degrees may include better study habits and so-called 'soft skills' which spells out into communication and collaborative and cooperative behaviors that enables humans to not only de-escalate dangerous and potential fatal situations, but also negotiate for advantageous placement of self and those close to oneself even in the face of overwhelming obstacles or unfair disadvantage. When others react with anger or despair, those who have a broad palate of interpersonal skills and coping mechanisms, will be successful by persevering, analyzing and assessing the status quo and strategizing towards a new outcome. These are all skills taught in college in various courses such as Algebra, History, Sociology and Philosophy for instance, also known as General Education, or the Humanities.

HIGHER SALARIES
A college education may be one of the best investments of time and money for a person's career. A 2018 report produced by the American Community Survey that was released by the U.S. Census Bureau stated that those who held a bachelor's degree were expected to earn a 40-year lifetime salary of about $3 million dollars on average, while high school graduates only took a lifetime salary of about $1.5 million dollars (www.census.gov). On average, those who held master's degrees earned $3.8 million dollars. Holders of professional degrees could expect lifetime earnings in excess of $5 million dollars.

Good Luck Destney
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Katie’s Answer

College is necessary for certain careers--engineer, lawyer, doctor, teacher, etc. College is NOT necessary for all careers.


There are many career fields that require certification that can be gotten through other types of education. If you don't think college is for you, I suggest checking out the programs at your local technical school to see what best fits with your interests.


College doesn't always have to be the next step after high school. My parents both went back to school while I was growing up. There are lots of non-traditional options for college including night classes and online programs.

Katie recommends the following next steps:

Check out your local technical school to see if they have a certification/degree program that fits your interests.
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Rama’s Answer

I am happy to add a few things on top of some great answers from everyone. College degree used to be requirement for many companies. Lately companies are dropping that requirement and focusing on aspects like curiosity, interests, aptitude and passion one can bring to a specific job or a role. College degree is never a waste and if you want to learn the fundamentals of subjects, it is great to learn in a classroom setting and solve some solutions. Later on working realtime the knowledge is always useful in applying our analytical, critical and problem solving thinking. For me, I am in a job that I did not learn anything about in college but looking closely, there were many aspects of certain subjects like People management, employee relations and marketing management that helped me advance in my career. So it was very useful.
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Shannon’s Answer

Although college is definitely not required for all career paths, it is definitely something recruiters look for on resumes. So it could be the factor that gets you in the door, versus another candidate. If you are still unsure what type of career you’d like to have, them college is a highly recommended first step. It will give you the credentials, the knowledge, and the experience that will help you to know more about yourself and the world, which will help you to decide what career path makes sense for you. If the cost of college is what’s making you second guess it, please take the time to research options. There’s help out there, and it’s so worthwhile to invest in your education.
If you already know the career you'd like, them maybe technical schools, or earning particular certifications relevant to that field, are a better option. Those are great alternatives to college depending on the industry that interests you.
Good luck!
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Diana’s Answer

Yes, I recommend going to college for your career. If you're not able to attend college out of high school, consider working for a company that provides college tuition reimbursement programs. This could help on the financial side.
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Vineeta’s Answer

The quick answer is "NO". You can be a college grad, and still be a total failure.
However, the chances of success are much higher with a college degree. If you are in a course that you would love your life to be invested in, it is definitely the best start. A college degree starts you on a path to financial and personal success. After that, it is totally up to you to make a good life for yourself. There are a lot of ways to define success in your life. If you have an education, you will probably have better opportunities.
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Christine’s Answer

Hi Destney.

That's a great question!

It all depends on what you choose for a career. If you choose the business sector, for instance, a college degree may be required before you are even considered for employment. However, if you consider yourself more of an entrepreneur, then a college degree is not critical as you can make your own path.

I do strongly recommend a college education if you (or your family) can afford it. Keep in mind, there may be financial aid available.

I can speak from personal experience....
Both of my parents did not graduate high school as they both grew up very poor and needed to find jobs to support the family. Despite these hardships and lack of college experience, they wanted both of their children to go to college as they knew it would make life a little easier. Both my brother and I have earned MBAs - we have made my parents so proud. And, they were right - a college education definitely helps move you along further and gives you greater earning power. I am so thankful that I spent time earning my college degrees. Overall, I went to school for twelve years to earn my associates degree, bachelors degree, and masters degree. I first went full time to a two year community college then spent earned my remaining degrees part-time during the evenings while balancing a full-time demanding job. I really enjoyed it as it was something I was doing for ME and I knew the hard work would pay off. My career thus far has included a Top 20 Forbes company as well as a top auditing firm.

No one can take away your college degree -- you may lose a job or suffer other hardships -- but you will always have your education to fall back on. It's worth gold!

Good Luck to you as you consider your options!

The world is your oyster - AIM HIGH!

Take Care,
Christine Aubin
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Ron’s Answer

Hi Destney,

My brother and I are both software developers. We've had similar career trajectories, especially taken in 5 year averages. I have a B.S. Computer Science. He dropped out of college after a year. One of his professors taught one class and worked full time in eCommerce. When my brother took his class the professor offered him a job so he dropped out. I stayed in college for an extra 3 years.

I definitely started at a higher salary than he did, but he also got paid for 3 years while I was still in school and accumulating student debt. There were times where he had to work harder to be heard. I also feel that finishing my degree taught me how to more gracefully navigate some of the politics in the workplace. Sometimes it doesn't matter why something has to be done, it just has to get done.

Once you have some idea of where you are headed career-wise you should talk to people currently in the field and ask what they think about a candidate with vs. without a college degree.
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Nancy’s Answer

Destney,

Hi, great question!

College is not always necessary for a successful career. Other paths to career education are vocational high school programs, which are free and can prepare a student for work in certain technical trades, child care, restaurant work, bookkeeping, and other jobs that don’t require college. Ask your guidance counselor at your high school.

Another career that doesn’t require college sometimes is sales. If you are a good salesperson, your skills will be in demand no matter your educational background. You could try a part time sales job to see whether you like it.

Nancy recommends the following next steps:

Consider this website to learn more and get you thinking about no college careers: https://money.usnews.com/money/careers/slideshow/25-best-jobs-that-dont-require-a-college-degree
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Michael Ivelin’s Answer

It all depends on what you want to do in life. Certain careers require an education as their professional licenses are tied to it. For example, if you want to become and auditor or a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) you will need 150 college hours of which 30 need to be in accounting. It's the same way for lawyers, dentists, doctors, and etc. However, if you want to become a plumber, electrician, or mechanic, no education is required. You can learn a lot of these jobs by just taking an online course or starting a job at a company that would provide you with training.

The first step that you need to draw down some ideas of what you like to do and see what jobs correspond with that. Then do some research and determine what the requirements for those jobs are and what kind of money are earned for them. A lot of times you might want to do something, but when you realize that you will be making close to minimal wage doing it, you reconsider your options. For example, my friend wanted to be a firefighter because his father was. He did the one-year training and when he finally became one he realized that he was making only about $1,800 a month which was not enough for him to pay his bills. Therefore, he started a second full time job as an ambulance driver. However, even with that job he still could barely make $3,000 from both jobs a month and he did not had any free time as he was working over 80 hours a week. Now he is a truck driver and he makes over $4,000 a month working 5 days a week as a local truck driver. He is home every night and has all of the necessary benefits.


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Anny’s Answer

This depends on the career you seek. For some professions: teaching, law, medicine, engineering, the added education is absolutely necessary to build a career. As well, if you look into the future of work, more and more jobs will require creativity and innovation, flexibility, having a problem-solver mindset, collaboration, communications, ability to learn. When I look at my own career, some of the "content" of what I learned is largely no longer relevant. However, the skills that I've picked up: curiosity, logic, analysis, and teamwork continues to serve me well.

When I started college, I had ambitions to work in banking. However, mid-way through my undergraduate, I figured out that I did not want a career in Economics. However, I took enough courses in other fields to identify that Marketing was my true passion - college helped with that.

Note that if your desired field of work does require a degree, your investment in your college studies will likely pay off as college grads (on average) earn more over their lifetime vs. non-college grads.

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Louise’s Answer

Destney,

A college degree is a great asset. While we've heard of people succeeding without a college degree, it is not necessarily true for everyone. Many of those who have succeeded professionally without a college education ended up enrolling in college later on. They realized that their success did not guarantee certain knowledge (i.e. business management or law) that could be beneficial to their line of work.

Most importantly, knowledge is power. Material possessions can be taken away due to mismanagement or what have you. However, nobody can take away the knowledge and skills one acquired through a college education.

Finally, success is not only measured by accumulated possessions or accolades. A person is equally successful when they follow through on what they are passionate about, thus fulfilling their goals in life.

Best wishes to you!

Louise recommends the following next steps:

Find out what you are passionate about, as this will lead to a successful and fulfilling career.
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Tina L’s Answer

Honestly, 20 years ago I'd say without a doubt but today.. It depends on the career. You obviously can't become a doctor without having gone to college but if you're willing to take an entry level role, work hard and build a strong network, you can carve out a great career in banking, retail or the automobile industry, just to name a few.

Whatever you decide, remember completing a college degree takes discipline and dedication and those are life skills that you can use once you graduate and start a career. So....it's leverage and can't hurt, although it can be financially taxing.

Weigh your options..pray about..and follow your heart..

Best wishes
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