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What job should I get?

I like math and finance. #finance


Calleigh are you looking for job while in High School or a career after College? John Frick

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Gloria’s Answer

Hi, I think that you should start think what kind of place you would want to work for. Most businesses have a financial component where your natural preference is valuable. The bigger question is how do you want to use your skills? Is there a type of business that would interest you? For example, I work for a Technology and Entertainment company. The finance team would need to know and care about the laws governing financial work for this type of business. I used to work for a bank. All the employees have to be aware of very specific government regulations that guide all types of groups, including finance. I would say, if you haven't already, explore internships or job shadowing opportunities in a variety of industries in the area of finance to see how various industries impact financial work. You may even consider offering your skills while volunteering for some organizations. Non-profits have specific financial skills since they are always in raising money mode to do what they do.

Good luck on your job search.

Great answer, Gloria. I work in the medical device industry. Our finance people are an important part of our projects and helping us get our products to the marketplace where they can help people. Your advice to think about the industry to work in is great. Su Reaney

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John’s Answer

Calleigh Below, you'll find jobs outlined based on broad categorizations that will help you decide which career is best for you. The finance industry spans a wide variety of careers, including those related to individual investors, corporations, banking and stocks. If you're interested in careers in finance but aren't sure about the particulars of the available jobs, you're in luck!

FIVE CAREERS OPTIONS IN THE FINANCE PROFESSION WORTH CONSIDERING

1.) EQUITY RESEARCH ANALYST – Need to have a comprehensive background in financial markets. They work under financial managers and ultimately provide them with recommendations about investment decisions. One part of their job involves gathering all the information that they need in order to develop a complete picture of businesses other options for investing money. They specifically focus on securities investments so they look at bonds, options and stocks. They need to consider the individual option as well as the market conditions surrounding that option so that they have a clear idea of how they expect developments in the global market to affect that investment.

• The minimum educational requirement for equity research analysts is a bachelor's degree in engineering, business or another field that develops strong analytical skills. Experience in an entry-level role as an analyst is important so those planning on entering this field may want to take college programs that include internships if possible. Many employers prefer applicants who have a master's degree in finance. Those who are preparing for a career as an equity research analyst may also pursue Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) certification.

• Salary outlook during this time it expecting the average job growth rate for all occupations will be 5%, while the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts job growth of 6% for financial analysts during this timeframe. PayScale indicated that in 2020 the mean annual income for equity research analysts was $94,500.

2.) FINANCIAL ADVISOR – Financial advisors, or personal financial advisors, inform and offer suggestions to their clients about a wide range of financial options and issues. Financial advisors help their clients plan for specific financial events in their lives and discuss different ways to help their clients reach their financial goals. This may involve researching and discussing various investment opportunities, savings accounts for things like college or retirement, mortgage options, or different insurance policies with their clients.

• Although there is not a specific financial advisor degree, most financial advisors need at least a bachelor's degree. Aspiring financial advisors may pursue degrees in areas like finance, business, accounting, mathematics, economics, or even law. Some helpful college courses for financial advisor training may include topics in estate planning, taxes, investments, and risk management. There are some financial advisor schools that offer online courses and training in financial advising. It is not typically required, but students may wish to pursue a master's degree in areas such as business administration or finance, to increase their chances of advancement. Professional certification, discussed in more detail below, can also lead to advancement.

• In May 2020, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the median yearly wage for a personal financial advisor was $90,900. Financial advisors can make money in a number of ways, including flat-rate salaries, hourly wages, commissions or transaction fees.

3.) ACCOUNTING ANALYST – Jobs require the knowledge and use of generally accepted accounting principles to review and interpret financial data. Education requirements for accounting analyst positions usually include the minimum of a bachelor's degree, and some employers may require applicants to be licensed or certified, depending on job duties. One common option is a bachelor's degree program in accounting, which teaches students about financial monitoring for public organizations, government entities, and individuals. Students can also learn about tax reporting and preparation, auditing protocols, budget reports, and other financial data records. Some degree programs prepare students for industry certification, such as becoming a Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

• Accounting analysts must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree in accounting, finance, or a similar field. A master's degree in accounting or a master's degree in business administration with an accounting specialization are commonly required for employment. In some cases accounting analysts are required to be CPAs. This designation is awarded after completing the CPA exams given by individual state boards of accountancy.

• According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth for accountant and auditor positions, including accounting analysts, was projected to grow by 6% during the 2020-2028 decade. Predictions for that same decade imply that budget analysts would experience a 4% rate of growth and financial analysts, such as fund accounting analysts, would experience a 6% growth rate. Salary statistics gathered by the BLS in 2018 showed that the average annual salary for accountants was $80,500.

4.) FINANCIAL ANALYST – Financial analysts gather and evaluate industry and economic fiscal data to predict investment performance. Their findings are used by businesses and individuals to make decisions about stocks, bonds and other financial stakes. They might work for financial institutions, corporations, insurance groups and securities companies.

• A bachelor's degree in finance or another relevant field is the minimum qualification, but many financial analysts improve their employment prospects by earning master's degrees. Professional certification, which calls for a degree and passage of examinations, is another way to advance a career. Some positions, such as those that involve the sale of stocks and bonds, require licensing, which is acquired after employment.

• Average employment growth of 7% was projected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) for the 2020-20286. The BLS also reported median earnings for budget analysts of $78,900 per year.

5.) RISK MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST – Concentrate on providing relevant financial insight into business decisions. It's common for risk management specialists to work for companies or organizations and their primary role is to make assessments and recommendations. They may look at things such as how to address a specific business task and determine if there are risks associated with how that task is being completed. Ultimately, their objective is to ensure that the business or client makes the best decisions possible to minimize potential risks in their business operations and decisions.

• The minimum educational requirement for a risk management specialist is a bachelor's degree, statistics have suggested that those with additional postsecondary studies may have an advantage over others when seeking employment. Studying business administration or other related fields, such as finance, can help prepare individuals to enter this career field. According to O*NET OnLine, 48% of risk management specialists have a bachelor's degree, 33% have a master's degree and an additional 11% have a post-baccalaureate certificate. This means that 44% of those working in this field are confirmed to have continued studies beyond a bachelor's degree, which is comparable to the 48% who have only completed a bachelor's degree.

• Risk management specialists are grouped with 'financial specialists, all other' by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS indicates this group of professionals should see a 6% job growth rate from 2020 to 2028. This is slightly higher than the job growth rate that the BLS expects for all occupations from 2018 to 2028, which is 5%. According to PayScale, as of 2020 risk management specialists earned a Average income of $70,000 per year.

Calleigh as you begin considering a finance degree and looking at schools with finance programs, you should strongly consider the career you're most interested in, as you may want to tailor your studies to the career paths you want to pursue. The field of finance contains many institutions and career trajectories, so you might first decide what industry you want to work in and then look at specific roles within those industries. Some popular industry choices include banking, insurance, and corporate finance, and the career choices available within these industries vary.

Hope this was Helpful Calleigh

Thank You Hari. “The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” — William Shakespeare John Frick

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Jennifer’s Answer

I really liked that some took a slightly different approach to this question. Instead of focusing on the "finance" related fields others gave more detail into the IT world and how finance can apply. This opens up a whole new area of focus for the person asking the question so they know they aren't just limited to the accounting and finance world. No matter what industry you are in and what career path you take, don't limit your possibilities. I have an accounting degree and have worked in a number of different fields throughout my career, from general bookkeeping for an apartment complex, to the IT industry, and now Medical Device manufacturing. Keep an open mind about the vast possibilities you have available to you. I think at this point you should focus on the education requirements for these career paths and how much additional schooling you are willing to do. Research the job requirements within the fields that interest you most and research the schools that suit your needs so you know what to expect going forward.
Hope this helps broaden your mind of available possibilities! Good luck!

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Margarete’s Answer

Besides of having a lot of options in Finance, and mostly of that are related with math, you have always to think about your technical skills and personal skills to do the best decision. Follow same examples, and make sure it will be something you can be you also, work is a big part of our life, so we also have to have fun and like what we do.
Accounting: besides the technical skills and graduation, you have to like to work most of the time very focus and concentrate, most of the time you work alone doing you activities, usually you are a person that likes interact with others and work as a team to see all together but not talking much with internal and external customers

Auditing: Interaction with a lot of internal customer at company (if you choose internal audit), Interaction with external customers and projects, if you choose to work with external audit, so you have to like to deal with people, and the challenges that are always dealing in audit process, as you will deal with the professional ego sometimes, as you are questioning people work, so you have to be prepared to show always the good side of audit and how it can help in the process.

Other area as financial services (accounts payable, collection, accounts receivable etc) will give the opportunity to work with internal customer (sales and care for example, plus logistics and others), and with customers and supplier. you will be always focus in better process and productivity, as automatize (robot for example) as the volume is high. Have to love to deal with people different profiles.

Commercial banks involves also sales in a indirect way, provide services and good options to customers (people or companies), strong targets, so you have to love to work with targets, not that in the others activities you will not have it, for sure you will, but targets are a little more challenging in some type of banks, as much as you grown. Have to love to deal with people and many times to search the best solution for their financial problems also.

So in summary, even being very good in math, do not forget to evaluate the human scenario, and how much you also can invest on that, to be successful you have to live what you do, because like that you will not do a job, you will be connected with that, engage and will solve any issue you have.

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Cricket’s Answer

There are so many different career options for those who love Math and Finance! Many have responded on options on the Finance track. If you love Math, other career options to consider include engineering - civil, mechanical, aerospace, etc. or an actuary. Actuaries analyze statistical data to forecast risk and liabilities for future benefits.

Economists also work in the math space plus work with fiscal policy - so may be a good combo of both of your interests. Economists also analyze statistical data.

As others have mentioned on this thread - you should consider what else gives you joy. Do you enjoy working with people or are you more introverted? If you are more introverted, careers that work with analyzing or researching data may be a good fit for you. Do you like solving problems or fitting puzzles together? Then you may want to explore careers in finance and analysis.

Hope this helps! Good luck in your career exploration!

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Philip’s Answer

Hi Calleigh,

I would suggest the following mainly because I believe an engineering path is not as often considered in terms of Finance but is currently a hot job market for those with these skills.

Information from: https://www.iaqf.org/financial-engineering:

STUDENT RESOURCES / WHAT IS FINANCIAL ENGINEERING
Financial engineering is the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems in finance.

It is also known as financial mathematics, mathematical finance, and computational finance.

Financial engineering draws on tools from applied mathematics, computer science, statistics, and economic theory.

Investment banks, commercial banks, hedge funds, insurance companies, corporate treasuries, and regulatory agencies employ financial engineers.

These businesses apply the methods of financial engineering to such problems as new product development, derivative securities valuation, portfolio structuring, risk management, and scenario simulation.

Quantitative analysis has brought innovation, efficiency and rigor to financial markets and to the investment process.

As the pace of financial innovation accelerates, the need for highly qualified people with specific training in financial engineering continues to grow in all market environments.

I hope this helps and I wish you all the best in your future endeavors!

Philip recommends the following next steps:

Further research Financial Engineering here: https://www.iaqf.org/financial-engineering

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Sarah’s Answer

Have you considered engineering? Engineering, and especially fields like electrical engineering, require a strong foundation in math. As you move up in your career, financial skills become extremely critical to describing the business value of your products.

I got a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering because I loved math. I am now 10 years into my career doing engineering program management, where I lead teams of engineers and other professionals to maintain my company's products in the marketplace. I use financial skills daily to make sure our products are performing well and are worth the investment of making ongoing design changes and other maintenance needed. Every day is an adventure!

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Cynthia’s Answer

Math and finance... you would do great in a financial role. There are many fileds in the financial world, you have Accountants who make sure to keep the company's accounts in good balance, you have Financial Analysts who support the business in understanding how their decisions impact these same accounts and the financial health of the company, you could also explore a new field called Pricing that combines a bit of both plus some marketing to it. This last field focuses on analyzing what products are worth in the market and how to be profitable.

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Maria’s Answer

Financial advisor
Statistical Quantitative Analyst
etc

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Jose’s Answer

Hi Calleigh,

Below are some of the options if you like math and finance.

> Math Teacher or work part time as a math tutor
> Financial advisor/analyst
>Accounting
>Work in a statistics office
>A Career involved in stock market investments

Good luck I hope this helps.

Warm Regards,

Jose

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Jose’s Answer

Hi Calleigh,

Below are some of the options if you like math and finance.

> Math Teacher or work part time as a math tutor
> Financial advisor/analyst
>Accounting
>Work in a statistics office
>A Career involved in stock market investments

Good luck I hope this helps.

Warm Regards,

Jose

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Tammy’s Answer

Maybe take a look at Data Analytics. So many companies want data on their customers and have it analyzed to better their businesses and products for their customers.

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Erin’s Answer

Agree with other answers in that there are a lot of great options in the Finance world. I started in Public Accounting on the Audit/Assurance side, and I would strongly encourage that path. You would want your under grad degree to be in Accounting. The Big Four firms, and I'm sure others, give you a ton of great experience right off the bat and you get to supervise/lead people very early on which I think is fairly unique. After that, a lot of people go to a company and work in the Finance org, but the Public Accounting experience really sets you up well.

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Riley’s Answer

There are wonderful jobs in the finance field that you could take a look into if you are interested in finance. Two of my recommendations would be "Financial analyst" or "Financial Advisor" as these current jobs will have a lot of positions opening in the next 1-5 years with many professionals in these roles starting to retire.

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Elena’s Answer

Hi Calleigh,
I would recommend to look into internship in the area that interest you. A lot of companies have internship programs throughout the year. That will help you to understand working environment better and see the options that you might have. You will be able to see/shadow people in different roles and hopefully help you figure out what you would like to do in the future. Once you know that, you will be able to figure out what you need to study and focus on to move forward.
Hope that helps,
Elena

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Dr. Liz’s Answer

There are different alternatives for math and finance. You need to think if you want to work for a company or by your own. Some of the careers combine Math with other areas like science. Some of them related to Math could be from a Doctor in Mathematics/Finance (like to read an investigate, look for opportunities, create and teach others) to Engineering (needs a lot of Math and science), and like other mention Accountant, Auditor, Finance specialist and depends on the area you may need certifications, revalidate to get a license, among other requirements.

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Johanna’s Answer

The great thing about a career in finance is that all companies and industries need the support of finance professionals. I would recommend narrowing down what industry interests you and finding a way to use your interest in finance and math to pursue that industry. For example, I almost majored in biomedical engineering in college but ended up going on to get a major in Accounting. I still had an interest in the medical device industry so I got a job at Medtronic in finance and still get to work in that industry applying my skills in a totally different way than I would have imagined back in High School. Good luck!!

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Marica’s Answer

If you like math, consider the Commercial Insurance industry. We spend a lot of time analyzing a companies loss experience to predict future losses and generate a proposed premium. It's a very interesting field with a lot of opportunities.

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Ao’s Answer

First of all, it is important that you find your interest! Only in this way can I know from which direction I want to continue my exploration or further study!
If you like math and finance, then you can work in banks/insurance companies/securities companies/fund companies/investment companies/professional teachers/research institutions, etc.

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Sagar’s Answer

You could go for several jobs in the finance, accounting, and securities trading sectors. A few of the jobs could be:

1. Financial Analyst
2. Finance Controller
3. Auditor
4. Equity Research Analyst
5. Portfolio Manager
6. Quant Trader
7. Derivatives Trader
8. Corporate Accountant
9. Financial Planner
10. Financial Advisor

Most of these jobs would require you to possess an undergraduate degree or professional certification (like CPA, CFA) in accounting and finance. Securities trading may not require a degree in finance but a degree in STEM subjects.

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Natasha’s Answer

If math's and finance are subjects you are good at then you can go into accounts/ Audits or even study to become a Chattered Accountant

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Chris’s Answer

Hi Calleigh!

I had an interest in math since second grade. Once I got into middle school, the attraction to math naturally brought my attention to finance. I began investing in a custodial account and by the time I began high school, knew I had interest in a finance career. I earned my undergrad degree in finance. During undergrad, I put more focus on landing an internship than I did on getting A+'s. It worked well as I earned a paid internship in financial services which launched my career. I am not suggesting you take the same path, but, you should decide what is is about math you enjoy.

Chris recommends the following next steps:

Focus on what you feel is best for your goals rather than listening to recommendations of others.

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Philippa’s Answer

Have you tried taking an aptitude test? These are available in your career center or try online.

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Jian’s Answer

I feel pretty much every job in finance needs good maths skills and finance knowledge.

there are a few paths you can try, accounting/auditing, corporate finance, commercial bank, investment bank, and quantitative finance if you are really good at maths and willing to take a master/phd degree.

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CHRIS’s Answer

Your best bet with those interests is to look at getting a degree in business administration. This curriculum is full of math and finance and will allow you a broad range of career paths once you graduate from college. Don't worry if you're unsure of what you want to do afterwards right now. As you further your education you'll get a better idea of what you want.

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Julissa’s Answer

Hello! You should look for jobs that you feel like you are going to enjoy it. Have you read about all the available careers and one of them calls your attention? Keep reading about the possible jobs associated with the career that you choose. If you like computers, there are tons of job opportunities there such as programming (which is well paid), data analysis, Project Management etc.

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John’s Answer

A field that I have not seen addressed yet is that of Actuarial Science. This is the a create in statistical calculations on life expectancy. These roles are key in Life Insurance companies. It's critical in being used by these companies to determine fees for Life Insurance policies based on your present age.

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Jeanie JiYoung’s Answer

Data scientist, who can read big data and analyze trends and create meaningful outcome.

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Rachel’s Answer

If you like math and finance, you should consider financial analysis, data analysis, accounting. Understanding the basics of finance, accounting and data are great foundations for building a career in business in a variety of industries, specifically the financial industry, like banking.

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Maria’s Answer

Financial advisor
Statistical Quantitative Analyst
etc

Hi Maria, can you please elaborate on this answer? Why did you suggest them? What do people in these positions do? Gurpreet Lally

If you like math and finances, then I thought these could potentially work....Financial advisor = work in a bank setting or investment company where you deal with customers and manage their investment accounts ….offer suggestions on how and where to invest money, help people understand the market, set goals within a certain time frame, analyze their risk tolerance and come up with and investment plan for them.... Maria Selagea

Statistical Quantitative Analyst = if you like math and finance, I went on the assumption that you may also like statistics ….(I know is not a must, but I assumed that)….in the event you do, you could also pursue a career as a statistical analyst ….people in this position help various companies (especially investment companies) to asses certain portfolios that are up for sale, create models and figure out if the investment will be good or not, if it will yield the desired return etc.... Maria Selagea

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Jamie’s Answer

I would recommend looking at accounting and finance. There are a ton of jobs in that career path and you can pivot once you get degrees once you see what you like.

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John’s Answer

If you are strong in finance and more broadly, math, I would strongly recommend beginning in investment banking. Investment Banking careers allow you to gain so much knowledge on the business models of various industries and how they create value. Doing so is rigorous, but the learning experience will be unparalleled that will open so many doors of opportunity.

-Once you begin undergrad, declare your major as Business Finance, and maybe minor in math or statistics. This will allow you to get a handle on understanding the fundamentals of businesses, how to handle the idea of valuing companies, with a more quantitative approach.

-Get involved early. Join the school's investment club. This will help you get plugged into networks to start getting your foot in the door places, while also teaching you the jargon and culture of the investment banking industry.

-Read the book, "Investment Banking- valuation, leveraged buyouts, and mergers and acquisitions" by Joshua Rosenbaum and Joshua Pearl

-Try to do a summer internship that will offer you relevant experience to then be able to apply for a summer analyst position the summer before your senior year with a big investment bank. (Your investment club will serve as a support system)

-Once internship is landed, work hard, and a Full Time offer will come to fruition.

-I will say that this is easier said than done, but if you work hard and set your mind to it, and ask for help when you need to, I know you can make it happen.


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Laura’s Answer

The great news for you is that the job market really embraces math and finance. You have a lot of options to choose from if you want to work in a field related to those. Since I'm a full stack developer/computer science major, I know off the top of my head that FinTech is huge right now. Since you're a math person and computer science is very math and logic-oriented and yet allows you a lot of creative freedom, you should definitely look into being a full stack developer, a front-end developer, a back-end developer, a software engineer, a data scientist, and a data analyst. There is a growing need for high-security, functional apps that makes life easier for the consumers so that companies can conduct business in an efficient manner. You should also look into being a financial analyst, an investment analyst, a financial adviser, a financial manager, and a stockbroker if you'd rather stick to finance specifically. However, if you branch out of finance and still want to remain within the main business disciplines, you may also want to look at operational management/industrial engineering which focuses on how to make business processes simpler by using math. Accounting and auditing are also great careers for people who love to be immersed in math. Also be sure to check out what being a business strategist and an organizational psychologist entails. Strategy and organizational psychology are very creative fields that you may like. Lastly, perhaps you may think about going to law school for business/commercial law. Learning about copyrights and trademarks is very fun.

Laura recommends the following next steps:

FinTech: full stack developer, front-end developer, back-end developer, software engineer, data scientist, data analyst for making high-security, functional apps that makes life easier for consumers, processes simpler for businesses -- the more easy a process is, the more business is conducted, the more a consumer likes a company
Financial Jobs: financial analyst, investment analyst, financial adviser, financial manager, stockbroker
Operational management/industrial engineering: how to make business processes more efficient by using math
Accounting and auditing
Other fun jobs: business strategist, organizational psychologist, business/commercial lawyer

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Kathy’s Answer

You can go to sites like www.careeronestop.org to find information on career exploration, training, and jobs. This site has tons of great information as you begin your search. You can look at different careers and what it takes for you to receive training, watch videos on different job types, and get questions answered.

You can also go to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics at https://www.bls.gov/audience/jobseekers.htm to look at various occupations and learn about the current and future jobs outlook, advancement and training requirements, employment, salary, and a 10 year outlook for those occupations. There are also lots of other topics to explore on this page that will give you great information to help you get started.

Good luck!

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Richard’s Answer

My son works in finance (entry-level, investment banking), and I spoke with him about your question. I'll answer within the context of investing, since commercial and investment banking don't really require advanced math as such. There are plenty of jobs at the intersection of math and finance, the most obvious of which is quantitative finance. There are many firms, such as Citadel, that engage in algorithmic trading and do cutting edge mathematics research. There are also many hedge funds that use simpler math, such as linear regressions or other basic statistics, to inform investment decisions but are ultimately discretionary, fundamental firms. The key thing here is whether you want to used advanced math to develop automated trading strategies (quant finance proper) or use applied math to try to determine which firms are the best investments (discretionary trading. Keep in mind that all except for the most advanced trading firms will use more applied math/statistics than analysis/topology type math!

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Jian’s Answer

I feel pretty much every job in finance needs good maths skills and finance knowledge.

there are a few paths you can try, accounting/auditing, corporate finance, commercial bank, investment bank, and quantitative finance if you are really good at maths and willing to take a master/phd degree.

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