Skip to main content
9 answers
10
Asked 634 views

Do you recommend taking a gap year?

Although I do want to go to college and get a degree, I have seen many articles where people have taken a gap year to fix their health or to raise enough money for college and I was wondering if I should plan to do the same.
#career-choice #career-path #JULY20 #gapyear #break

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

10

9 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Dexter’s Answer

Hi Emilie,

I think this really depends on what you're looking for. Although I have thoughts where I think I would want to take a gap year between high school and college, but realistically, I couldn't have given the grants/scholarships that were available to me and the meager income I would have earned (wouldn't have enough money to just travel, though that sounds amazing).

Personally, even with all the benefits of a gap year, I do think going straight to college would be the best for me. This is because college picks up right after highschool (and then some), so having that gap year would have put me at a greater disadvantage compared to my peers. Think of it this way. I live in California, where the K-12 system is definitely not as good as other states (rank 37/50 - source: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/rankings/education). When you get to college, you'll have a diverse set of students from all over the country. Those that are from the better states have an advantage. They were either taught more in K-12, or they had smaller classes, so they had more attention (and so less chance that a student skipped over a subject they didn't understand). When you get to college, I think it picks up right where 12th grade ended for those in really good schools. So for people from California, you're already behind when college starts (I would recommend doing online learning or taking some summer courses during the summer). If I were to take a gap year, I'd forgotten more stuff, so I'd been even more behind. Of course, this argument is simplified since within a state there are great variances between great schools and not-so-great schools, but I think you get the picture.

Also, think of it this way, the faster you get through college, the higher the possibility of a higher paying job. The job that you can get out of high school will always be there for you, even if you can't find the higher paying work. Given that, from a earning point of view, it'd be most beneficial to get through college, then start working.

Now, if you're super lucky to have parents who are willing to let you travel on their dime for year, I would highly recommend taking that gap year. I think the life experiences you can have and the upside of building your character that way outweighs the arguments I placed above.

I hope this helps, Emilie!

--
Dexter

ps It looks like Texas is ranked 33. So similar to California.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for this answer! I love the idea of traveling around the world and I wanted to try and do it before focusing on a career I have to be committed to. Emilie
Thank you comment icon Hi Emilie, Thank you so much for the response! Well, if that's your goal, I do hope we get this COVID19 virus under control in America, as many countries have blocked Americans from entering their country. Dexter Arver
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kiirsten’s Answer

Hello Emelie!

You have asked a great question. I have some friends who have not taken a gap year and have gone straight through to college, I have some friends who took a gap year, and I have a few friends who meant to take a gap year but ended up taking a gap half-decade. I personally went straight through to college, but times were different when I went versus the current time/conditions we are in right now. Have you thought about applying for any scholarships? There are many scholarships that go unclaimed each year! For the first two years, all courses are "general education" so getting started at community college to save money those first two years could be an option.

You can also take one course a semester if you wanted to, so if you had a part time job, or had to care for a family member, you would still have time.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering! Could you give some examples of organizations that tie out scholarships that go unclaimed? Thank you! Emilie
Thank you comment icon Hello Emilie-- here is a link to help with your search for scholarships :) https://www.financialaidfinder.com/scholarships/find-a-scholarship/ Kiirsten Suomu
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Khaled’s Answer

HI Emilie,

You need to plan your life across multiple situation, having a gap as an option or a word to use is giving yourself an excuse not to finish thing. Every personal act and react to life challenge is different but all depend on you as a person and the willingness to stand quick after every fall.

Best of luck in you life, plan for it to be full of success and joy.

Khaled Khoury
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Simeon’s Answer

A gap year can be incredibly powerful and useful tool if used correctly. I would ask what you are hoping to specifically achieve during the year to help keep it focused. Emotional recovery? Career exploration and introspection? Saving up for college? Traveling? Make sure that you don't spend a gap year sitting on a couch only watching Netflix. Even if you're not doing anything, take the time to research what different future paths look like and how satisfied you'd be in any given position. Try to find people in the careers you're considering and sit down for an honest conversation about the best and worst part of their job.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Marilyn’s Answer

Hi Emilie,
At this stage of our pandemic, I would recommend a gap year. This will give you more time to plan and prepare as well as to arrange for your financial aid for school. At this point, most colleges are doing online courses, so maybe it would also be worthwhile to just take one or two classes online through a local community college. Just be certain that your hours will transfer to the college of your choice. This will give you an idea of what college coursework involves.
Best of luck in your choice,
Marilyn Balke-Lowry
College Guidance Consultants
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question! You're advice really helped me. Emilie
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nupur’s Answer

Hi Emilie,

Good question, it depends on what you are looking for at this point in your life. If you want to take a break from studying to figure out what you would like to do in the long run, a gap year would definitely be beneficial - provided you have the means to support yourself during this time or if you have a support system set up.

If you are looking to raise and save money for college, taking a gap year to do so is perfectly fine. Life doesn't always follow a pre-prescribed, one-size-fits-all formula for everyone, and many people find that the time they have taken off has proven to be great for them.

Given the current situation, a gap year may be more common among students than we think!

Nupur recommends the following next steps:

Assess your short-term and long term goals
Think about the future career you would like to have
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question! I will definitely consider your advice. Emilie
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James’s Answer

This is a question that hits home for me. I didn't get the options I was hoping to get when it came to college. I had a $60,000 scholarship to go to a decent school. But it felt like settling. It didn't feel right to make a commitment like that. A gap year was the best choice for me to get some professional experience and decide what the next move was. It was one of the best decisions I ever made. I got to discover my love for law enforcement. I have been in the field ever since, while pursuing my degree. I'm not saying it's the best decision for everyone, but it's worth considering.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Heather’s Answer

I took 2 gaps years! I think it was helpful for me to get a part time job established that would be flexible with allowing me to attend college, too. I also believe it made me more appreciative and work harder in college knowing that I needed to make good grades and graduate so that I could have a career, because I knew I did not want to work in retail for minimum wage for the rest of my life! One con was that I was older than most of my classmates and it was slightly harder for me to make friends.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question! Your perspective was extremely helpful. Emilie
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christopher’s Answer

Hi Emelie,

Taking a gap year is ultimately your choice, but I think it's a very good idea. I currently serve with AmeriCorps NCCC/FEMA Corps and most of the people i serve with are in college and are taking a gap year. It id a government program which will give you around $6,200 for education purposes if you finish your term of service. There are other things that you can do to make some extra money as well, but if you need to take a gap year, don't be ashamed of taking one. Gap years can even be considered some sort of strategy in some way such as taking one to make more money for the next year or if you want a break for awhile that would be cool as well.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question! Your information was really helpful. Emilie
0