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I am a rising college freshman in International Policy; however, I believe that every job requires some sort of technical skills, so I was curious whether it is wise to take a computer science minor or just take a few classes to gain those skills?

I am very concerned about future job opportunities. I am attending Georgetown university in the fall, and I want to maximize my skills for the future job market. #computer-science #government #job-market #international-affairs #technical #foreign-policy

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Christen’s Answer

I think it's always great to have some more practical classes in your roster. Computer science or even an excel/modeling class would prove very helpful. Some classes from the business school would be good as well: Accounting, Finance, etc.
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Todd’s Answer

If you enjoy classes on technical subjects, you might want to consider taking some that equip youth work with data (e.g. advanced statistics). I am not sure computer science is readily applicable to international policy.

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Randy’s Answer

My first piece of advice is: don't worry so much! You're a rising Freshman and have plenty of time to figure things out. But since you asked...


I would say a few classes in computer science to gain the skills would be sufficient. If you Major in International Relations/Policy, and you indeed to work in the field, I'd suggest other courses/skills to consider before computer sciences. The first priority should probably be proficiency in a second language (if you don't have one already). Secondarily I'd recommend some history courses related to regions/countries in which you have an interest. Generally speaking IR classes are big on theory. history classes can help with a solid foundation which is really quite useful in the field.

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Silpa’s Answer

Hi Saisha,

You can start with taking a computer class and see if you like it. If you do, then you can pursue a certificate or a minor depending on if the course list for that interests you.

Or you can even "audit" a class by taking permission from the professor if you do not want to be graded (you may still have to pay for the class).

Some technical courses that may interest you are Python or HTML/CSS. Python is easy to learn yet a very wanted skill on the market right now (no matter your major). HTML/CSS is web design course which is often used for content editing, which maybe related to your major.


Silpa recommends the following next steps:

Look at your University Roster for a class that interests you
Ask the professor if you can audit it or if really interesting, take it
Decide if you want to pursue a minor or certificate at that point of time
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Mikela’s Answer

Saisha - congratulations on your acceptance to Georgetown! Based on the date of this question, it looks like you are a sophomore now. I went to Georgetown University myself and graduated in May 2014. Georgetown offers a TON of resources to find a job after graduation. I highly recommend going to the career services center and learning about the resources they offer -- it's never to early to talk to them about your interests and various internship opportunities. Attend information sessions on campus and leverage your network. Many companies come to Georgetown to recruit and hold interviews on campus. Good luck!
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