14 answers

What is the best character trait employers are looking for in new employees?

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I want to know what character traits employers find most important in the work place today. Maybe there is a particular trait to hone in on or be more conscientious of. #management #leadership #employers #project-managers

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14 answers

Morgan’s Answer

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Totally agree with Jeremy's comments, and that's not just for those new to the work force. Even after 21 years working I still prep for an interview and learn as much as possible. Check the company out in YouTube and see if they have a "Life at" video showing their employee history. Check our Yahoo financials, or if you have a friend working there already, reach out to them and see what they truly think about the company. A lot of firms have a referral program so if they are not referring you for the position then maybe they are not 100% behind the firm.


Look at models like the 30/60/90 that look at what you would do within the first 30/60/90 days in the job. Write down the pros and cons as you find them, and be yourself. These people could potentially be your employers for the rest of your career so be honest from the start.

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Jeremy’s Answer

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I've conducted hundreds of interviews over the years and there are 2 traits that I look for in a potential employee. 1. Someone who is prepared. An interviewer shouldn't have to give you an ink pen, a copy of your own resume, or a general idea of the position. You should come prepared. 2. I look for people who appear to be genuine and honest. One of the most important facets of most jobs is the team environment. If you don't come off as someone who can mesh with other people very well then all the knowledge is useless.

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Dave’s Answer

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I've hired many people over the years and this is what I look for:
- Great communication skills. Does the candidate have the ability to express themselves confidently and calmly, even in a stressful job interview. Can they answer the interview questions without "yes" or "no" answers and without rambling responses?
- An inquisitive nature. Does the candidate have an interest in my company, are they informed and are they asking good questions beyond the usual "what are you looking for in the ideal candidate?"
- A problem solver. Does the candidate take the time to ask about the challenges my organization is facing and are they able to describe what they'll do to help fix those problems or address those challenges.
- A plan to get productive quickly. Does the candidate have an idea of how they'll get up to speed and productive? Do they have a short term and long term plan or at least some ideas of what they expect they'll need to learn or accomplish in the first 30 days and beyond?
- A sense of what they'll need help with. This goes beyond the usual question of "tell me your strengths and weaknesses". Can the candidate honestly assess themselves and describe what they think they'll need help with when they come aboard?
- An interest in my own leadership style and the organization culture. Does the candidate ask about my own style of working with the team? Does the candidate ask about the organization culture and what it's like to work here?


I hope that helps and good luck in your job search!

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Jason’s Answer

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  1. Be prepared. Bring everything you need including pen and paper.

  2. Research the company. I cant tell you how many times my knowledge of their company opened doors for me.

  3. Research the job you are applying for. Know as much about the process of that job before you interview.

  4. Practice your answers to interview questions out loud at home until it flows quickly and naturally.

  5. Be honest and try to make the interviewer smile if possible. The more it feels like a conversation and not an interview the more likely they are to choose you.

  6. No stimulants before the meeting. You will be nervous enough you don't need Red Bull helping :)

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Melissa’s Answer

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I agree with all of the responses above, lots of great advice. Being prepared is crucial but you must also be confident and be ready to answer the questions of "why do you want this position, what will you bring to the team"? Employers want to hire someone who is enthusiastic and passionate about doing the best that they can. They also look for someone who possesses exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written and who has organizational agility. Good luck in your search, I hope this helps!!

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Susan’s Answer

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An employer will always want his employee to be smart, honest with a good communication and listening skills. The employer will like his employee to provide ideas and useful inputs while decision making. The employee should be a aware of his/her job and have an expertise to work efficiently.

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Simon’s Answer

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Good answers above especially regarding being prepared and genuine. I would also add be professional in appearance and in your communications. Listen, and pick up on what seems to be important to the company/interviewers. Follow up in a few days with a thank-you after the interview. Good luck

I agree with above and also would like to add someone with a good work ethic and strong communication skills are a super trait to have Julie McMahon
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Jason’s Answer

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In my line of work (Accounting/Auditing), the most important skill/trait is the ability to work on a team. Many of the lessons that are taught and learned in youth sports are applicable to the modern workplace. I have been able to apply lessons learned in the hockey rink and on the lacrosse field to my job as an accountant/auditor.

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Craig’s Answer

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Competence and ability are essential, but attitude is king. I want a team full of people who work well together and are fully engaged to address all of the needs of the organization. I want to hire the candidate who most clearly conveys to me their ability to solve problems and creatively address new challenges.

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Shubha Florence’s Answer

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Employer wants smart people who can learn quickly and adapt themselves to the office environment with smart thinking and good communication skills.The employer will like his employee to provide ideas and useful inputs while decision making.

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Meena’s Answer

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Someone who is genuinely interested in the company and the job.
Good communication and presentation skills, team ability, whether the interviewee will fit in with other members of the team? Positive attitude!

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Nick’s Answer

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To add in what other people have replied, employers are looking for someone who is prepared, organized, and capable. Even if you do not meet 100% of the requirements for the job posting, you are still able to stand out from the other candidates by being prepared and doing your homework. Have you researched the role you are applying for? Have you attempted to do job shadowing or 1X1s with people in the department? How much research have you done about the company/role?

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Rae’s Answer

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Definitely research the company. You want to have insight and show that you have done your homework. Understand what they are looking to get out of the role so you can tailor your resume and your answers to match this. Be prepared to ask your own questions at the end of the interview. You can find examples all over the internet. This is also a good time to showcase your homework that you have done on the company.

Aside from the obvious and what has been previously stated, I don't think there is a general answer as to what traits employers find most important. This varies and different employers look for different things. Some hiring managers are more interested in the skills that you have that apply to the position where others may think skills are not as important if you show promise in that area but strongly display a personality that works well with others.
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Nakia’s Answer

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Honestly, I believe that the most important factor when it comes down to the final candidates is whether or not you are a likable person. If the hiring manager doesn't like you and the team doesn't like you, it doesn't matter how qualified you are. They want someone who will fit in and work cohesively with the rest of the team like a family. I had an employer that would have his team rank job candidates on likeliness to become a jerk. (Except he didn't use the word "jerk". He used a harsher word!) I was neck and neck interviewing against a person who was actually a bit more qualified than me. The team rated him a 4 for likeliness to become a jerk, and I was rated a 0. I got the job in the end because the team liked me much more.

With that said still make sure you are qualified and experienced because that will get you in the door. But keep in mind your personality might seal the deal!
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