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What should I major in if I intend to become a lawyer?

I've been searching the internet on what is better to major on if I intend to become a lawyer. Many websites have criticized that business,financing, or economics do not capture law schools' attention unless there is a very complex branch that pertains to either. All website that I have seen claim that pre-law classes or political science are also not recommended. So, what should I major in so I can at least get a generously rewarding job to become a lawyer in the future? Would a business major or international business major be more suiting to this situation? #teaching #teacher #professor #finance #law #university #lawyer #banking

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Elizabeth’s Answer

Best advice I received: It's best to major in something that you enjoy doing in order to obtain the highest GPA possible. A preference would be something with a writing component. Oftentimes colleges have pre-law fraternities/sororities that may be aligned with law schools. They also participate in mock trials, etc. Be sure to try and intern or work as a clerk (or similar) in the field to make sure it's the right decision for you. Best of luck!
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Carolyn’s Answer

Hello. I tell students that ask this question that my recommendation is that you either major in English or Math. The reason behind both of these is that when you become a lawyer you are going to have to be a master at writing and talking. You will write a lot of briefs, memos, contracts and lots of other documents, so your command of the English written word needs to be very good. Judges, other attorneys and your clients will read these document so you want to have professional documents (that does not mean they have to be full of legalese, just have correct spelling, grammar and proper use of the English language). This makes you look intelligent and like you know what you are doing. The other major, Math, can give you analytical skills that will allow you to analyze a potential case to see what the possibility of winning is as well as what types of claims you can bring. Analysis is a very important part of mathematics and it is also a big part of law. Make sure that you take some classes that you will enjoy as well. If you spend all of your time studying for required courses and not having any "down" time by having classes that you enjoy (swimming or other active classes help relive stress too) you will get burned out before you get through both undergraduate and law school. Good luck to you in your future endeavors. Remember the only thing that stops you from reaching your dreams is YOU. Move forward at a steady pace and you will do fine!

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Deidre Mercedes’s Answer

Some colleges offer pre-law courses which is preparation for law school. You could try that and see if the college you are interested in offer this program or apply to colleges that have this program.

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Estelle’s Answer

Your major is not as important as your undergraduate grades, your LSAT score, your letters of reference, and your personal statements on your law school application. For now, just focus on finding a college that fits you and your budget and a major that really interests you in college so that you will make great grades and get strong letters of recommendation from professors that recognize your potential.
Couple of other pieces of advice:
Look for hands-on experience: intern at a law firm or legal aid
Be active the world: volunteer in your community or on campus.
Improve your standardized test skills.
Practice public speaking and writing.
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Jeremy’s Answer

Really depends on what type of law you would like to pursue. As you know, being a "lawyer" encompasses many disciplines. So, it all depends what type of law you would like to practice.
For criminal law (which is what a lot of folks are referring to when they say the word "lawyer"), majors & minors like communications, debate, criminal justice, etc. . tend to help more than others.

But, if you would prefer something like corporate law, health care, etc. . .then business majors may be the way to go.

There are many other possible fields within the realm of "law" that you may lien towards. So, follow the path that makes the most sense for what type of law you would like to practice.
Hope that helps and good luck!

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Richard’s Answer

Law schools do not require a certain degree or even courses. Choose a major that interests you. My wife is an attorney, and she majored in history. She thought all of the reading and writing required for that major were an asset to her in law school.
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