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How do you stay hopeful after multiple job rejections?

Struggling college student. #students #career #givingiscaring


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John’s Answer

Laniya anyone who’s attempting to improve their life by putting themselves out there and taking risks will face rejection. It’s a sign that you’re doing something. And the only way to avoid it is to never try to do anything, and that’s a whole other problem. Of course, this isn’t necessarily something you want to hear when you realize you didn’t get the job you wanted. But if some time has passed and you feel that job rejection has taught you nothing but sorrow, consider at the very least that it’s forcing you to learn to accept it while moving forward. If things always went as smoothly as we wanted them to, we wouldn’t learn half as much.

Just by participating in the interview, you are practicing your interview skills, learning more about the career area you are pursuing; and believe it or not, you have an opportunity to build connections. Take the time to reflect on your approach to the hiring process to see if there is anything you could improve upon in the future. Review your resume, cover letter, what transpired during the interview, and your follow-up after the interview. Given what you learned about the job requirements and people involved, ask yourself if you could have done something differently in order to present yourself in a better light and one that made you seem like a better fit for the job. The interviewers were in a unique position to see your interview skills and professionalism in action, and may be able to offer valuable insight regarding how you can improve your prospects for future interviews. So why not take advantage of it?

So, keep applying, networking, and working on your long-term career plan. Best-case scenario, you’ll be an even more attractive candidate for the job you’re considering.

I hope this was helpful

John recommends the following next steps:

Arguably the most important part of applying for employment, no matter what company you’re looking to work for, is your resume. Make sure you’ve included the necessary personal information, all of your relevant experience, education, skills, references, and any other information you think should be included.
While most of the interview questions will be about you, many will be about how you might fit the organization and its company culture. A simple Internet search on the company you’re applying to work for can equip you with information you need to make a great first impression. Make sure you fully understand the job description of the position for which you're being interviewed. Be prepared for some version of the question: "Why do you want to work here?"
Whether you’ve heard back about the job offer or not, it’s important to follow up a few days after the interview. Send a thank you letter or email stating how it was a pleasure to speak with them and that you really appreciate the opportunity. Reiterate any thoughts about why you want to work for them, and be sure to offer them any contact information, so they can easily reach you with any further questions. This shows that you are just as invested as they are, and are sincerely interested in the position.
Create professional-looking social media profiles. Potential employers will sometimes do a quick search for you online or directly on various social networking websites and apps to get an idea of what you’re like as a person. As such, we recommend having a presence on social media platforms like Facebook. Also, try to have your social media profiles clear of any embarrassing posts that might deter someone from hiring you.

Thank You Danny. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill John Frick

Thank You Kim. “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” — Anne Frank John Frick

Thank You Zahari. “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” — Ivan Scheier John Frick

Thank You Laniya. If you talk about it, it’s a dream. If you envision it, it’s possible. If you schedule it, it’s real. John Frick

Thank You Chris. “If our hopes of building a better and safer world are to become more than wishful thinking, we will need the engagement of volunteers more than ever.” — Kofi Annan John Frick

Thank You Dexter for your continued support. Of all the 'attitudes' we can acquire, surely the attitude of gratitude is the most important and by far the most life-changing. John Frick

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John’s Answer

Main thing first is don't think you failed. There are so many factors affecting an interview. Ask how you did during the interview and what you can do to improve your interviewing process. It's a learning process and even though you may have done it perfectly, still doesn't mean they will hire you. They are looking for what they think will fit there needs. We are all different so we may not fit their viewpoint of what they are looking for. Thus, keep trying.

Other methods is having someone refer you to the company or using an employment agency to get you to the companies that you would have a better fit with.

Good luck!

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Kim’s Answer

Hi Laniya!

First question is this: are you getting interviews? If no, then we need to work on your resume.

If yes: You need to understand the competition. The technology age has made it more difficult. It is too easy to apply for jobs, so, there are more applicants than there were eons ago. We used to have to get dressed and go drop off the resume in person! A friend of mine posted a job at midnight, and, within an hour, had ten applicants! This is part of it. Secondly, experienced people are always looking for better jobs. So, if you are applying for "good" jobs, realize that there are many experienced people also applying for those jobs! Third, we are in some really crazy times. The COVID-related layoffs contribute to the number of people competing for those jobs! Knowing all of this, just landing the interview is a major accomplishment! Celebrate that!

Two things to consider.
1. You might need to brush-up on your interview technique. Are these virtual interviews or in person? How do you think you are doing?
2. You might need to apply for positions that are the next step down from the position you really want. For example, many paralegals start as an administrative assistant in a law office, and work their way up, either at that office or by changing jobs.

Please feel free to reach out to me via the Universal City Public Library, or on LinkedIn, if I may be of further assistance!
Kim

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Dan’s Answer

I think the main thing to realize is that you can do everything right and still get turned down for a job. I've worked at a big company for over 20 years and we usually get at least 3 - 5 qualified candidates (sometimes a lot more) for most positions. Ultimately we have to make a hard decision but the individuals that didn't get the job didn't fail - the competition is just really tough. In some cases a company will post a position even if they already have an internal candidate lined up because their company policy is that all jobs have to posted for set period of time (usually 1 - 2 weeks) before offering the position to someone.

Looking ahead - the main thing I would encourage you to do is treat every interview as an opportunity to get better at selling yourself. You're going to get the right job eventually so just stay positive and make sure you're advertising all the great things about yourself during the interview process. Don't be afraid to do some shameless bragging :). Interviews are not the place to be overly humble or understated. Like most things in life, interviews get easier with practice so stay confident and good luck!

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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

I am sorry to hear that you have not been able to get a job yet. It can be very challenging to get a job when you do not have job experience. All I can recommend is changing your perspective about the rejections. Make sure that you find a way to use every interview as a learning opportunity. What positive element could you take from the interview? What would you improve if you could? Sometimes you may not be able to sort that out for yourself, so talk with someone you trust about each interview after it is over. Explain to them what was asked and how you answered. This discussion should include how you felt. Did you feel confident or were you really nervous? Did you ask good questions? I learned early in my job searches that employers expect you to know a lot about the company. Do that research so that you are able to show the interviewer that you cared enough to do the research. You can even ask questions about information that you read to get clarification.

Even though I have a job now, I often interview for other jobs, most of which I didn't get. The easiest way for me to deal with any disappointment is to think of all interviews as practice. I would offer that you should practice interviews as well. Think about what questions you expect to be asked. Then make sure that you know how you are going to answer them. You may get behavioral interview questions, questions that are going to ask you how you handled something in the past. You should think about what behavioral questions you may be asked and how you would answer them. For example, for a customer service job, you may be asked how you have handled an angry customer. Maybe you haven't ever had a customer be angry with you. Think instead about how you have handled anyone who was angry about something that you did. Think about how you calmed them down.

You are going to find a job soon. Make sure that you are learning through these disappointments and it will make you a stronger employee.

Gloria

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Alexis’s Answer

Hey Laniya,

Even those of us with many years of experience and skills experience rejection. I would encourage you to focus not on the rejection itself, but about what you learned in the application and interview process. Think of the whole application/interview process as an educational opportunity, and go into it with that mindset. Constantly look for something you learned from the time you submit and application until after an interview. And always keep optimizing your resume and applying to every opportunity you are interested in. Early in your career, be creative in the types of jobs you consider applying for, and don't limit yourself to any one job title or type of employer. Look for opportunities that are close to the field you want to work in most, and use everything as a learning experience. As you have more job experience, it gets a lot easier and you won't have to submit so many applications.

-Alexis

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Sunny’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

I have experience in applying for 100+ companies and did not get a job, so maybe I know what you feel. I think it would be so hard if the job that you applied for is the one that you really wanted. But you know what? It IS okay. You probably would not have multiple jobs at one time, which means you only need one offer in the end. I believe a better offer is coming your way, so treat yourself with good food and rest and get refreshed for your next job application.

After making yourself feel better, you might want to know which job field you want to focus on. It might be more effective to apply for one or two job fields with one customized resume than apply for multiple jobs without customization. Also, you might want to check your resume and consult with a professor or consultant if there's any improvement needed. Lastly, it is also very important to stay confident during the interview process. If you did not understand the question or are not sure how to answer your question, feel free to ask them to repeat the question or say you are not sure about that question but here's what you think on that question. The more you feel confident, the higher the chance of you getting a job.

I wish you all the best!

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Heather’s Answer

It is hard not to feel deflated after any kind of rejection. Last year, I was the top 3 candidate for 6 jobs and never made it to #1. But I did get the job offer on #7.

My mantra is Rejection = Redirection. Write it on your mirror and burn it in your brain!

You learn something valuable from every experience - whether you researched a company, customized a cover letter or had an interview. Reflect on what you learned and incorporate it into the next opportunity.

I also find having a career coach is invaluable. A good friend, a professor, a relative or professional. Practice your 60 second "tell me about yourself " pitch on them and practice interview questions!

Lastly, if you are not selected after interviews, ask openly and without defensiveness for feedback. From the hiring manager or HR, on what you need to improve. Carry that forward for next time

Rejection is redirection.


Good luck on your journey!!

Heather recommends the following next steps:

Find a career coach
Read the 60 Second Interview book
Tell your story in 60 seconds and open with it consistently. Practice it!!

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Debajit’s Answer

Keep learning (read/watch/listen) on subjects relevant to your target job area. Try to find out on what criteria you failed at each recruitment process. Reach out to people you know who can recommend you.

Don't lose hope

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Lisa Bond’s Answer

Laniya, I always think if I didn't get the job, that job wasn't for me.

There are a couple of things I pay attention to before applying for a position: do my skills closely align with the job opening? Is this the right culture for me to thrive?

Then after my interview, I always step back to assess it and ask myself the following: Was I prepared for the interview? Did I answer the questions completely and confidently? Did I present well (in both appearance and the manner in which I answered questions)? Did I present my skills to my future employer through the answers to the questions?

The key is to find the right position for you, not just any position. And you need to go through the no's in order to get to the yes.

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chris’s Answer

Hello Laniya:

I read through the advice given and all of it was good. Sometimes its easy to internalize and feel that you are being rejected. As someone who has interviewed many fantastic candidates over the years, there are so many factors that come into play that impact a candidate selection that you don’t have a lot of control over as a candidate. So don’t let it become personal in how you think and feel.

Prepare for the interview, if you lose because you were completely prepared then, it wasn’t a right fit. Also make sure that you are asking questions during the interview process as you want to make sure the company and position are a good fit for you. As you’ve dealt with the rejections, don’t let that pressure make you take a job that doesn’t feel right to you.

Good luck in our job hunt. Stay positive and make the choice that is best for you.

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Josh’s Answer

It can be very difficult to face rejection, but it is important to know that the right position is out there for you and it takes diligence to find it. One thing you can do is to ask the person you interviewed with for feedback on why you were not chosen. Sometimes it can be hard to hear the feedback but if you listen and take as a way to make yourself a better candidate it can be very enlightening. Step away from stressing about the positions you are applying for and ease your worries doing an activity you enjoy. For me that is hiking and being in nature it can help to remember who you are. When you are interviewing if you are stressed and pressing to get a job, the interviewer will sense that and it will not help you get the job. Be yourself and make sure you are able to show who you are through he process.

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Aline’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

First of all, I just want to say that you are whole and you will get through this! Multiple job rejections could be something that breaks your spirit or damage your confidence but believe me, just keep trying! At some point you will find your place, you just got to keep trying. Don't close your doors to any opportunities, you won't always end up where you thought you would. Sometimes, you'd even get to a very unexpected place and wouldn't know it's going to make you happier than what you imagined. Always be brave and be you! Someone is bound to see that you will be an asset and you will do great things!!

Love,
Aline

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Heather’s Answer

It is hard not to feel deflated after any kind of rejection. Last year, I was the top 3 candidate for 6 jobs and never made it to #1. But I did get the job offer on #7.

My mantra is Rejection = Redirection. Write it on your mirror and burn it in your brain!

You learn something valuable from every experience - whether you researched a company, customized a cover letter or had an interview. Reflect on what you learned and incorporate it into the next opportunity.

I also find having a career coach is invaluable. A good friend, a professor, a relative or professional. Practice your 60 second "tell me about yourself " pitch on them and practice interview questions!

Lastly, if you are not selected after interviews, ask openly and without defensiveness for feedback. From the hiring manager or HR, on what you need to improve. Carry that forward for next time

Rejection is redirection.


Good luck on your journey!!

Heather recommends the following next steps:

Find a career coach
Read the 60 Second Interview book
Tell your story in 60 seconds and open with it consistently. Practice it!!

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Bob’s Answer

Hi Liniya,

You have received a substantial amount of great advice. Below is a summary of things to consider:
- Networking
- Learning about the company and seeing if you can find a point of contact within a company that you are interviewing. LinkedIn provided a great forum for getting introduced to people.
- Get involved in a job search group. Learn from the events that are sponsored, and if possible see if you can arrange to have a practice interview where you can be critiqued in a safe environment.

Keep a positive attitude!

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David’s Answer

In my career, I have found many obstacles. Before I found an engineering job (the area I have studied in) I have spent four years after graduating trying to secure a job. I was going through multiple interviews a week however I could not secure a job. Always the same response, either no enough qualifications or I have no experience. It was very frustrating.

However, I tried to use that frustration into something positive. I started going through evening classes and worked administrative jobs so at least I do something in my life. I tried to be in a constant mindset to improve myself, to never give up. I was still applying for engineering jobs during this period.

With more experience gained through those evening classes and with more hunger to find my path, I became more aware of my abilities and how I can succeed and that also made a difference during the interview stage because it showed that I was still doing something.

After four years of trying I managed to secure a job that I like and that I can progress. So never stay still, keep trying your best even when you see all the doors closing. Have faith in yourself and keep on hungry to improve yourself.

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April’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

We are all afraid to be rejected but in the reality of life, we will get rejections more than what we imagine/expect.
If you were rejected many times, believe me, I have been rejected multiple times so I know the feeling.
My first few rejections when I was applying for work I was so devastated, I asked myself am I not good enough? what is wrong with me? why they didn't hire me? Those are the common questions that come to our mind and there was even a time that I almost gave up, but because I really need to find a job and so I did not give up, and instead of thinking negative thoughts I started thinking of how will I improve myself for my next interview, I started researching on the proper gestures during interviews, how to react or answer to the interviewer's questions, recalling the questions from previous interviews and start thinking of better answers and it helped a lot.
Be prepared prior to the interview, better if you do a little research about the company that you are applying for, just be yourself and always PRAY.

Consider those rejections as your learning curve and use that rejection to motivates you to do better in the next interview.

I hope you soon find a job where you will be happy :)





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