4 answers

Is it more beneficial to take more credits per semester in a shorter amount of time or less credits per semester in a longer amount of time?

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As a student trying to save money on college fees while still maintaining a great GPA for my resume, I want to know whether or not I should be taking 14 or 18 credit hours per semester. I am in the Public Health Sciences Field. I want to make the most of my college experience. #college #health #graduate #time-management #public-health #credit

4 answers

Elaine’s Answer

Updated

I like your question. If you are trying to save money the fastest you complete college the soonrr you will be in the work world making money. However you have to understand and be honest about your abilities and tolerance. If you learn quickly and don't mind spending a lot of time studying then doing it more quickly will be fine. If you take time to absorb information and want to enjoy other parts of college life then you need to think about taking your time. Only you can answer this by knowing yourself and being honest with yourself. Good luck to you

Rachel’s Answer

Updated

Make sure you do not take on more than you can handle and I would not reccommend doing this in your first semester. However, I took 21 credits per semester for 2 yrs (and a regualr course load the other 2 yrs) and I was able to finish two B.A.'s and 2 minors. SO I would definitley say MORE credits, LESS semesters. You will also save money this way too and you can even graduate early. But you must!!!! Must! Must! Have a time-management plan <span style="background-color: transparent;">You have to set a routine for yourself and stick to it for the most part. Once you get into the groove of a routine it will be much easier for you to manage your time and have enough time for everything you need to do (including relaxing). Make yourself to-do lists on a weekly basis, use Google calendar or a planner to keep track of events, deadlines, and due dates. In addition to setting a routine and sticking to it, plan out relaxing activities into your day. Or set aside a time, after everything is done for the day, that you can have "me" time. I have also personally found it essential to not only find time for myself but also make use of that time in a way that is best for me and my holistic wellness. I have found the HeadSpace app to be an essential tool in helping me relax and generally feel more relaxed throughout the day, Guided meditation, even if you have a busy schedule, will make you feel more at ease and relaxed throughout the day as a whole (not just when you have the time to relax and focus on that "me" time).</span>

<span style="background-color: transparent;">Set a routine.Use Google Calendar.Set aside Me TimeWrite weekly to-do lists and use a planner.Find a peaceful and restful activity that will help you feel relaxed.</span>



Lisa’s Answer

Updated

I believe this is very subjective to what your major is and your own pace versus the actual number of credits. For example, I tried to balance each semester so not to have a schedule full of hard classes or classes that required additional lab hours. I made the mistake of taking algebra, financial accounting and econ all in one semester. As a result, I didn't do as well and had to retake one of the classes during the summer session to get my GPA back up. Many of my electives required additional computer lab hours which I needed to calculate into my week to plan my schedule. Knowing this, I did not signup for other classes that would require a lot of time outside of class. All of this can be a bit confusing and overwhelming at first but colleges have advisors that can help you structure your plan to complete your degree.

Jennica’s Answer

Updated

Hi Hannah, in my experience, the slower you go (with reason) allows you to develop a better understanding of your future goals and career. If you're already pretty mature and have a sold professional identity then I would recommend you do take as many units as possible so you can start work ASAP. But do remember that college is for earning experiences and skills, creating a professional and social networking, finding what your passionate about, and transitioning from academic scholar to professional. College is not simply a place to earn a degree!

My recommendation would be to follow the suggested major curriculum. This way you'll stay with your fellow classmates throughout college and you'll make better connections with your professors and peers.