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Is there a "main" coding language that most programmers use?

As stated in my career goals, I would love to delve into the Computer Science field for my career and or future.
#programming

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Julio’s Answer

Hey Calvin!

For the most part, the biggest coding language right now is Javascript (Honorable Mentions: Java and Python). Whether you want to work for a major tech company or a small start-up, a good chunk of them are going to use Javascript. Now, there are many aspects to what coding language you should focus on, depending on whether you want to work in front or back end, what kind of company you want to work for, whether you want to be a software engineer, cybersecurity, data scientist, etc.

If you want to dive into the field of computer science a bit to see if it really is something that you're passionate about, I recommend using some free resources or following videos on Youtube on the coding language, "Python". Python is very beginner friendly, but very powerful, you can build all kinds of apps with it and it can give you a good insight on what coding is all about.

Keep in mind that once you choose to major in Computer Science, you won't necessarily stick with one coding language all the way through, you will most likely start with Python and begin to advance to C or C++, then into more complex languages such as Java so don't worry too much about the "main" coding language for now. Another thing to keep in mind is that the even if you don't spend a lot of time with Javascript in college, they will most likely teach you languages that have very similar fundamentals so that when you do begin working with Javascript, you have a good idea of how it works although it may have a few different quirks and commands; you can apply that rule to a variety of different languages as well.

Next Steps:
- Try out Python and follow guides and resources to see if you like coding, once you get the hang of it, try building more complex applications.
- Find out what kind of lifestyle and company you would like to work at; Google, Uber, Airbnb, Facebook or a small startup.
- Do research on the different careers that revolve around computer science and see if any of them grab your attention.
- Have fun coding! Try and build fun projects, try to enjoy it, and don't think about it too much as a job or a hassle, but a hobby for now!

Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon I agree these languages are commonly used these days. Malik Khan
Thank you comment icon I agree with this too! Pedro Ferreira
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Gregory’s Answer

My industry focuses quite a bit on Python now. The fundamental languages were Unix and Linux, but have morphed into Red Hat Linux.
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Hanish’s Answer

A main programming language probably depends on your personal choice of programming language. There are a lot of programming languages out there but polls show that Javascript and python have been the most popular languages among developers. There are companies that have preferences when it comes to some languages like Java, C++, but a main language just depends on someones personal choice.
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Vinodh’s Answer

Programming languages are more of a tool to achieve a goal, an analogy would be a pen for writing. Does not matter which pen you use.
My suggestion would be to work on fundamental concepts required for programming - like OOPs, logical thinking, data structure, algorithms etc. C++ would be a great starting point for these.

I agree with the other advices about Java Script and Python being the most popular and more widely used ones.
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Pedro’s Answer

Hi Calvin,

There are plenty of programming languages out there so it is hard to give you an answer with which one is the most used. However, based on my experience across a few companies the most common programming languages used in the industry tend to be:
java/javascript, python, Matlab and C/C++/C#

Hope that helps!
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Aaron’s Answer

You can google what are the "fastest growing langues" and you'll see Javascript. This is a great language but what should be understood better is what do you want to do with the lanuage. For example, we call french a "romance language" because it can sound prettier than a rougher language when trying to get emotional with our feelings. There are words in Spanish and French that exist when expressing your feelings but don't exist in English. It could take 3--4 English words just to describe one word in Spanish sometimes.

The same goes for computer language. Golang is popular for your backend infrastructure, so is Java because you can build apps that work for MacOs and Windows without much difficulty. Python is great for data visualization and even some machine learning though it can be a little slower performing and requires more version maintenance and upkeeping than Golang. Javascript is flexible and coupled with nodejs can be used both for front and backend. However, it's a more "forgiving" language which means you can sometimes get away with errors in your code that you couldn't get away with in Java or Golang. This can be nice because you are less likely to crash but it can also hurt your apps performance without you knowing.
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Andrew’s Answer

This is a very typical question for people who are interested in entering the field, but no, it really depends on what kind of problem you're trying to solve and in which industry you're involved. At the end of the day, programming languages are tools, and as such, some languages may be a better fit for a particular domain than others. For instance, if you're interested in Web development, I would consider JavaScript/ECMAScript or TypeScript (which is a superset of JavaScript). If you're interested in iOS development, there's Swift (and optionally, Objective-C for legacy frameworks/apps). For backend development, there are C#, Java, Kotlin, Scala, Rust, etc. For scripting, there's shell scripting, Ruby, etc.

I would encourage you to take a look at some of the programming books offered by The Pragmatic Bookshelf (https://pragprog.com), specifically: "Seven Languages in Seven Weeks" and the follow-up, "Seven More Languages in Seven Weeks" to really open your eyes to the possibilities offered by various languages and how they also cross-pollinate ideas.
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Zahid’s Answer

I second that there is no "main" language per se in programming. Rather it is whatever language you prefer and what kind of technologies and platforms you want to work with. For instance, if you want to do front end work only then you will be using a different set of languages (React, Angular, Javascript, etc. ) vs if you were doing back end work vs working as a full stack developer. Then there is also what you are working on android, apple, web applications, desktop applications?

There are, however, languages that are more popular than others and more in demand. To see Top 10 Most Popular Programming Languages, check out here: https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/most-popular-programming-languages/

The important thing is to learn the fundamentals of programming. Once you have the foundation down then you can apply that to whichever language you choose and it would easier to pick up more languages as well.

As for getting started, Harvard's CS50 is a very popular choice that I would recommend. It starts you out with C and moves onto python and front end (javascript/html/css). But more importantly, it tries to help you build that foundation.
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Karimulla’s Answer

Hey Calvin,

Doesn't matter what programming language you consider as "Main", but take one and be strong in it.
For example, if you are strong in Collection the concepts are the same in all programming languages except the syntax.
The company mostly looks at you how you are solving the problem, the language can be anything that you can get from Google or from some tutorials.
As Julio said, you choose Javascript it is very simple and lightweight to learn and develop, but learn with a strong understanding.
All the best !!
Thank you comment icon Javascript is good to start with. Malik Khan
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Joseph’s Answer

I don't think you could say that there was a stand-out "main" language overall, but there are certainly main languages for certain subfields - like JavaScript on the web, Java on Android, Python in certain data analysis fields etc. If there's a particular field you want to go into, choose the appropriate language for that field; but otherwise, many of the common languages have very similar concepts and syntax, and it's quite easy to adapt from one to another, so just pick whatever's most convenient as your starting point, and you can adapt later as needed.
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Mickael’s Answer

Hi Calvin,

No there is not a main programming language that every programmer use. There is, however, preferred languages based on what your goal is. For example, if you are working in website, javascript/java is probably a must as well as some other languages like php.
If you are working on developing hardware so you need to write the firmware, C and assembly are probably the main languages you are going to use.
If you go machine learning path, Python is probably the most used because of the large amount of libraries available in the domain.

What you need in Computer Science is:
- good logic
- learn existing data structures that will be used to help you solving your problem
- learn algorithm
- a language (at least one).
As a startup language, I do recommend Python for multiple reasons:
(1) easy to install and use
(2) high level enough that it abstract a lot so you can focus on the algorithm and not weirdness of computer architecture

I hope that helps
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