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What inspired you to be a programmer?

We are discussing careers in class and I am interested in programming.

Thank you comment icon Creating your own app using your creativity and imagination is a fun process! You can begin with the simple "hello world" and continue expanding your ideas as far as the sky. Manuel solis

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Jared’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

I was inspired mostly by a desire to *create*! I think computers are cool, and I always loved playing around with computer programs (whether they are games or utilities or solvers or whatever). When I first started playing around with programming websites I just wanted to create a place that I could call my own with the stuff I liked on it and my own style and hobbies. I remember the excitement I felt when I first made a webpage that actually lived on the public internet that anyone could access -- it felt like magic! I created something where nothing had existed before!

As I've become a more serious programmer, that feeling of creating something where nothing existed before has grown and evolved into a much deeper joy: puzzle-solving, building simple things that have complex behaviors, creating systems that help people, and so on. Programming is a skill that you can grow to infinity: there's always something new to learn, no matter how long you've been doing it. I love skills like that -- where I can just grow and grow and grow for the rest of my whole life. And because programs are all around us, I get continued inspiration everywhere everyday. Every app, every website, every microcontroller, every film, and so on. The more I understand how programmers help these things work, the more inspired I get to dig in deeper.

I gave a broad answer, because I think you asked a really open and inviting question. But if you have any follow up questions, please feel free to comment those below this answer!

Source: I've been programming pretty routinely now for about 11 years, and I did a tiny bit of simple website coding as a teenager as well.
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Ryan’s Answer

The allure of programming to me was the opportunity to be creative, problem solve, and innovate, all while keeping costs quite low. To try out a piece of code is oftentimes free (outside the cost of a computer and internet), which means the barrier to entry is quite low. You are often only limited by your imagination, which is very freeing, especially coming from an industry where trying out a new technology often meant hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars upfront. Seeing your own code run the way you want is a very satisfying experience.
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Scott’s Answer

Solving puzzles, generally not doing the same thing repeatedly, and new tech/concepts being introduced at a fairly rapid clip are good answers, so I'll introduce one more.

I was originally on a EE track until I took my first programming course. What hooked me was a malleability and rate of change possible while working with software, which, like most things, has both pros and cons. The cons are often working with management to solidify that software, while more malleable, still has real costs associated with change.
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Tony’s Answer

My father was a mechanical engineer, designing telescopes. He had a three month project in Austin Texas, and invited me to hang out with him. I was only 15 years old, and to keep me busy he suggested I learn how to type up punched cards and learn FORTRAN programming to help him out with his calculations. Then I was "borrowed" to help test out a new PASCAL language. My assignment was to write a new program every day to exercise the compiler. I would write the program, and debug it. If I couldn't get it to work, I would then go to their "Pascal Help Desk" which reviewed my code, and made suggestions. One time, I forgot to make the changes after lunch, and the program was broken before was now working. When I asked how this could be, they told me that the compiler was itself a program, and they fix it everytime I brought them an issue. I loved the idea that programs process other programs. That got me hoooked!
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Isabel’s Answer

Coding is amazing to me. Once you know your way around, there is very little but your own imagination to limit you. Whereas other crafts are limited by space or materials (ie a small woodshop couldn't build a massive boat), savvy programmers for the most part do not face the same restrictions. You can build anything you want from your laptop.
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Davinder’s Answer

doing coding and seeing things happening on the screen with minium effort
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Umme habiba’s Answer

Solving a problem, coding is Art where you can use your logic to implement any application

If you want to be a good coder, then make basic strong in any of programming language
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GRADI’s Answer

What inspired me to become a programmer was the ability to challenge myself and create whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted.

I also dreamed of changing the world one day if I could only learn how to write computer codes! To me, programming was and still is FREEDOM of expression.

Just like music or paintings, programming is an art form with unlimited possibilities.
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Umesh’s Answer

Programming felt like an intriguing puzzle to me, sparking my curiosity about how things function. Back then, not many people understood it, making it simple to be recognized as a programming wizard. This not only boosted my worth in the job market, but also helped me appreciate my own skills. From that point on, it's been an exciting journey and I've absolutely fallen in love with it.
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Jubanjan’s Answer

I really like how it has less drama! If (something) does (something), then for (items in list) do (x). Just tell it what to do, and it happily gives you the result.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Ethan,

My physics teacher in 1972 grade 11 inspired me to start marking computer cards with soft HB pencils. We would send these to the PDP10 computer at the physics department at the University of Queensland. That computer took up a whole floor of the building. I continued learning to code over the last 52 years I have worked in 10 computer languages. My choice of programming platform is Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 professional version.

I have been writing nutrition education software for 30 years and it is coming together gradually but it all takes time. There are still gaps in nutrition knowledge to fill and hopefully, the software will do it because one of the primary functions is to seek foods that are high in selected nutrients. There is the ability to select symptoms of nutrient deficiency and excess too. There is also a facility to screen out undesirables to a required level. For instance, limiting sodium to 25 milligrams per 100 grams of food and printing the list to the computer clipboard.

Please see https://www.pdfdrive.com/ for free E-books on programming languages. Just type in a search term such as "Java" or "C++" It is a very clean site.

GOD BLESS!
James!
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