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Asked 607 views Translated from Chinese (Simplified) .

Do a lot of jobs require coding skill?

Do a lot of jobs require coding skills?

I have no ideas about my future job. I want some suggestion from other people.

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Subject: Career question for you

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6 answers


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Lindsay’s Answer

- Answered as a team
Building off of Fred's answer, computer technology literacy is increasingly more important. Being able to keep up with real time and asynchronous communications in tools like Slack/Microsoft Teams is crucial.

Coding is an option, but there are many technology opportunities that do not require it.

Remote work has changed the way that folks work together, so being able to communicate good tone over technological communications is a skill that can be built upon and important in any modern day role.
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Fred’s Answer

CODING skills - no.
COMPUTER skills - absolutely.

Almost any job will require you to use a computer in some fashion or another. You will be creating documents, files, presentations, reading emails and texts...
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Elizabeth (Betsy)’s Answer

These are fantastic responses. I'd like to emphasize that within technical organizations, there are roles and positions like enablement, learning, and project management that don't necessarily demand specific coding abilities. So, indeed, there are numerous paths to achieve success in a technology company without being a coder. Some companies even offer in-house learning programs and courses, allowing you to further develop your skills once you're employed. Additionally, it might be simpler to acquire certain programming languages when working alongside colleagues who regularly use that language.
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Ka’s Answer

Most jobs do not require knowledge of coding but computer and application fluency as Lindsay and Fred have mentioned. You'll be using Outlook, Teams, Excel, Word, Powerpoint or some version of them.

Technology is a wide and varied world and has many roles. Obviously, if you want to be on the technology engineering side, you will need coding knowledge. For others, it will be helpful but is not mandatory. You can take classes in different aspects of technology beyond coding such as user experience, product management and project management to find out where your interests are.
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Sara’s Answer

** Answering as a team from PagerDuty**

Having coding skills or at the very least a basic understanding of coding is a definite plus for certain roles, but they are not needed for every role. Even being able to read the code would give you an advantage in many roles, but primarily in the tech industry.

While there are roles that require coding, there are so many roles where you get to work with or support those that are doing the coding/programming but you don't have to do it yourself.

We recommend you take a coding class to see if you even like it - this will help you decide if going into coding is right for you. As you are considering a career, take into consideration the things you are good at and also what you enjoy. This will help you determine what courses you should take or what way you'd like to take your career. Ultimately it's about finding what you're passionate about and following that.
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Kate’s Answer

I was in a similar position of not knowing what I wanted to do after college, and kind of freaking out about the fact that it seemed like I HAD to know how to code because "everyone" else did. This is for sure not the case. I did study statistics because I found it interesting, and I did learn a little bit of R in those classes. However, I never felt "good" at coding. In my job in tech consulting, I use a technology called Anaplan that does technically have some "coding" involved but more than anything, the fundamentals of "formulas" are important. While coding is great to know, languages change and new ones come along, so the foundations are more important than anything else. With that being said, I would focus on being good at Excel, as it kind of relates to all other languages.
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