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Is community college bad to have for nursing degree?

I would like to know if CC is bad to go to for nursing or if a 4 year is where I should be.

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Raquel’s Answer

Community college is a great place to start for nursing whether you want to be an LPN or an RN. Lots of community colleges have nursing programs where you get get licensed as a Practical Nurse. While pre-COVID, most hospitals were moving away from hiring LPN's, with the current nursing shortage it's not as much of an issue. You can also work in outpatient doctor's offices as an LPN. The higher licensure is an RN, you can also get this license at some, but not all community colleges. This license allows you to have more independent practice and have a broader scope. If you want to get a bachelor's degree, community college is still a great place to start. You can get most, if not all, of the required prerequisites done at community college and then apply to a university and then their nursing program. You can also start off with a community college RN license and then later do a program called a RN to BSN program where you get your bachelor's in nursing. There are lots of options available to you, no matter what you choose you can make a great nurse!
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Chloe’s Answer

Community College is not bad, but you do need to decide if it is the right fit for you!

1. Do you want to have a bachelors degree or associate? Only 5 states have community colleges with bachelors in nursing therefore if you do not live in one of those states you will need to go to a university to get your BSN.

2. Do you want to continue your education to a higher level of nursing? You will need a BSN to get a masters or doctorate.

3. Community college can be great to save money on pre-reqs. However many university’s will pick those who have already taken classes with them to be admitted into the program over those who have not.

4. Consider private colleges as well. My state has a grant for private colleges and the college itself offers every student scholarships so that it is affordable. I pay about 5k a semester in student loans.

Overall community colleges can be an amazing resource and I’ve known many nurses (lpn or rn) who have come from them. However if you do truly believe you want your bsn I would go to a university. You could save money by going to a community college first, but research the place no matter where you go. Some colleges have better resources than others, better scholarships, or may be partnered with different hospitals.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Mckenzie!

Deciding on the best place to pursue your nursing degree is a significant choice, and it's crucial to consider various factors. Both community colleges and four-year institutions have their unique strengths and potential downsides. Your decision should align with your personal circumstances and aspirations.

Let's start by acknowledging that both community colleges and four-year institutions can provide excellent nursing education. Community colleges often come with more affordable tuition, smaller classes, and flexible schedules - a great fit for students juggling work or family commitments. Plus, many community colleges have solid ties with local healthcare facilities, offering students hands-on experience and potential job opportunities.

On the flip side, four-year institutions might provide a more extensive and deeper curriculum, with a broader variety of specialized courses and clinical opportunities. Some employers might favor nurses who have completed a four-year bachelor's program, particularly for advanced roles or specialties within nursing.

When comparing the "quality" of education between a community college and a four-year institution, accreditation is a key factor. Accreditation is crucial in establishing the credibility and rigor of a nursing program. Both types of institutions should be accredited by the relevant accrediting bodies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), or the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). This ensures the program adheres to the established standards of quality and rigor in nursing education.

Career advancement is another important consideration. Both an associate degree in nursing (ADN) from a community college and a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) from a four-year institution can lead to becoming a registered nurse (RN). However, there's a growing trend in the healthcare industry favoring BSN-prepared nurses. This is due to evolving complexities in healthcare delivery and many healthcare organizations aiming to have 80% of their nurses hold a BSN by 2020.

Moreover, a BSN can unlock more career opportunities, including leadership roles, research positions, and specialized clinical roles. Some employers might offer higher salaries or professional development opportunities to nurses with a BSN compared to those with an ADN.

Your individual career goals also matter. If you're aiming for advanced practice nursing roles like nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, or if you're interested in research or teaching, a BSN from a four-year institution might better suit your long-term career goals.

Given the multitude of factors in choosing between a community college and a four-year institution for nursing education, it's hard to assign a specific probability to any single answer without knowing your specific context and individual circumstances.

That's why it's vital to seek advice from trusted sources like academic advisors, nursing faculty, practicing nurses, and professional nursing organizations. They can offer personalized insights based on your academic background, career goals, financial situation, and other relevant factors.

In summary, whether a nursing degree from a community college or a four-year institution is "better" depends on factors like accreditation, cost, career goals, and individual circumstances. Both can offer quality nursing education, but it's crucial for prospective students to evaluate their priorities and long-term goals carefully.

Here are the top 3 authoritative references:

1. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) - Represents over 840 schools of nursing nationwide.
2. National League for Nursing (NLN) - Dedicated to excellence in nursing education.
3. U.S. Department of Education - Provides information on accreditation and recognized accrediting bodies for educational programs.

Take care and stay blessed!
James.
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James Constantine’s Answer

HELLO McKENZIE!

Is a Community College a Good Choice for a Nursing Degree?

When it comes to pursuing a nursing degree, the choice between a community college (CC) and a four-year institution depends on several factors. Each path has its own set of benefits and drawbacks, and the decision should be made based on your personal circumstances and objectives.

Community College as a Route to a Nursing Degree:

Affordability: Community colleges are generally less expensive than four-year universities, making them a cost-effective option for students looking to save on tuition and other higher education expenses.

Flexibility: Community colleges often provide flexible class schedules, including evening and weekend classes, which can be helpful for students who need to balance work and study.

Small Class Sizes: Community colleges usually have smaller class sizes than larger universities, offering students more personalized attention from instructors and potentially improving the learning experience.

Bridge Programs: Many community colleges partner with four-year institutions to allow students to transfer credits easily and continue their education towards a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

Hands-On Training: Community colleges also offer practical clinical experience as part of their nursing programs, which is crucial for honing practical skills in a healthcare setting.

Four-Year University for a Nursing Degree:

Broad Curriculum: Four-year universities typically provide a more extensive curriculum that covers a broader range of topics in nursing and healthcare.

Research Opportunities: Universities often offer more research opportunities in the field of nursing, enabling students to participate in innovative research projects and gain valuable experience.

Networking: Studying at a four-year university can offer enhanced networking opportunities with professionals in the healthcare industry, which can be advantageous for future career prospects.

Specialization Options: Universities often provide more specialization options within the field of nursing, allowing students to focus on areas of interest such as pediatrics, geriatrics, or mental health nursing.

Career Advancement: A bachelor’s degree in nursing from a four-year university can open up more career advancement opportunities compared to an associate degree from a community college.

Conclusion:

In summary, the question of whether community college is a "good" or "bad" choice for a nursing degree depends on personal preferences, financial circumstances, career aspirations, and other personal factors. Community colleges can be an excellent first step for many aspiring nurses due to their affordability, flexibility, and practical training opportunities. However, some may prefer the broad education, research opportunities, and networking benefits offered by four-year universities. Both paths can lead to rewarding careers in nursing; the key is to choose the option that best aligns with your goals and circumstances.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN): The AACN is the leading voice for bachelor's and graduate nursing education. It provides valuable insights into nursing education trends and resources for students considering different educational paths.

National League for Nursing (NLN): The NLN is committed to excellence in nursing education and provides resources related to curriculum development, faculty development, nursing education research, and public policy initiatives.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The BLS offers data on employment projections, salary information, educational requirements, and job outlook for various occupations, including registered nurses. It provides valuable insights into the nursing field and potential career paths for aspiring nurses.

GOD BLESS YOU McKENZIE!
James C.
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John’s Answer

As a nurse for 25 years and a graduate of a 2 year associate program, let me assure you that there is no shortage of available jobs in the US right now. While some options like senior leadership roles may require or want a BS or advanced degree, the reality is that like most other businesses right now, work experience is often something that is considered when filling these roles. A community college will cost much less, get you the same license, and once you start working , you can think about continuing and getting your BS or another degree. If I had to do it again, I would still attend a 2 year program as I have watched many co-workers with large student loans they regret taking. I was able to work part time and pay out of pocket for my degree. It may also be worth looking at what your state offers as right now, the State of Maine is offering all HS graduates 2 years of tuition free in any of our Community Colleges. Talk about an opportunity!
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Stacie’s Answer

Absolutely not! You have to do what is best for YOU! Also, sometimes you might start with a degree from a community college, but then find a job that will be able to help finance the additional degrees/certifications that you might want to get. Everyone has to start somewhere!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Stacie for the advice. Mckenzie
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Amelia’s Answer

Absolutely not- Community College is a FANTASTIC way to start your path on a career in medicine!

Let me share my story.... when I first graduated from High School, I had planned to go to Kansas City Art Institute to work on a degree in Fine Art but I was really nervous about the move (my family lives on the east coast) at the last possible minute, I pivoted and opted to go to a local community college. While there, I met many, many young people working on nursing and/or natural science degrees- every single one of them graduated and went on to illustrious careers- one in particular (my now-husband) got 2 Associates degrees from community (1 Liberal Arts, 1 Natural Science) 1 BA in Biology from Cabrini then his PhD in Immunology from Thomas Jefferson University. He is now an Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania.

Moral of this story is that Community College is a wonderful step in the right direction, just keep moving forward!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Mckenzie
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Jeanmarie’s Answer

OMG...no, a community college degree, for nursing, is NOT bad!!!

Nurses are needed and getting a nursing degree, regardless of type, is required to be a nurse. Use that degree to get a job and experience. If you find you want to continue your nursing degree, the credits you received getting your degree in community college will apply...so you won't be starting from scratch!

If nursing interests you and that's what you want to do, get the education you can to get the job and experience!

Personal note, two of my friends went to community college for nursing and both got jobs. After a few years, one continued her education and got a Bachelor’s degree and then a Masters; the other one got additional training and certifications that were applicable to nursing jobs she wanted.

Figure out the path that works best for you!

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Mckenzie
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Oluwatobi’s Answer

Community College is a great place to obtain a nursing degree! Not only do you obtain the same level of education as a 4-year university, most community colleges are also more affordable. Depending on the school, most schools can also help you find internship and job placement upon graduating! My mother was an Licensed Practical Nurse for 15 years. She decided to go back to school, went to community college where she completed her RN nursing program where she received an Associate of Science in Nursing . She has been a Registered Nurse for the last 20 years and has been able to hold many different roles in the nursing field. She has worked with patients directly, held administrative positions and even branched out to train other nurses. The great thing is most nursing programs articulate with bachelor's degree nursing programs that can allow graduates to transfer credits to a 4-year university if you choose to go back to school later.

Check out the nursing programs at different schools in your area, and feel free to reach out to a program director or a career coach and ask questions about the programs. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Mckenzie
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Hailey’s Answer

I have found that community college is a great option for many nurses. You can start with an LPN and get some experience (and actually work) while you finish an RN program if you choose. Community colleges are often a cheaper option as well!
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Sue’s Answer

I think most places are strongly encouraging 4 years ( BSN) of schooling. Some employers will partially pay for your college degree is you are a 2 year graduate and working toward your 4 year degree.
Take care

Sue recommends the following next steps:

Would call a hospital that you would consider employment with. Talk to Human Resources and ask opinion about hiring for nurses.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Mckenzie
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