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How did you find the career that was right for you?

how did you decide what interested you most, in order to help pick your career?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Mack’s Answer

Hello Jules,

Just to illustrate that Tara's "equation" works, here was my path:
+In classes through high school I was good at math and science and loved learning about it
+I really enjoyed the thought process, logic, and problem-solving in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math; although we didn't call it STEM back then)
+The STEM field usually includes a pretty good salary and steady job; and I liked chemistry
+Society was in need of engineers to increase manufacturing efficiency, reduce pollution, create jobs in the United States, and improve quality of products
= So I found chemical engineering as my college major and career field
Point is, that "equation" works.

Some of other responses mentioned military experience. Even spending a couple of years in a branch of service might be a good idea to learn about "life" and, as was mentioned, allow you to explore your interests. While online evaluations and tests in the military, for example, are good ways to evaluate your aptitude, interest, and capability, if you are a student the school counselling office will usually have similar evaluations you could use and get help interpreting.

Good luck!
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Tara’s Answer

Hi Jules!

Great question. Finding the right career for you is definitely something worth pondering. I have a simple way of bringing this into your consciousness:

+ Something that you're naturally inclined to do/ can reasonably improve at
+ Something that you enjoy doing (i.e. are passionate about/interested in)
+ Something that society will pay you to do (after all, you will need to pay your bills eventually)
+ Something that society needs (this ties into our purpose for the greater good)

= The career for you

Love what you do, and you'll never have to work a day in your life :)
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Adrian’s Answer

Hi Jules,

One of the big pieces advice I would give anyone looking to find their career path is to follow your passion. Ask yourself, what am I good at? What interests me the most among all other occupations. Do not be discouraged when your career path changes since that is normal. Doing some research in terms of job requirements along with salary can help point you in the right direction. Good luck on your journey!
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Harry’s Answer

I did some time in the military and using their testing got into a general field. From there I got any job in that general field and did a few different types of jobs and eventually found my way to where I am now.
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Kimanu’s Answer

It's not as simple as it may sound, but here it goes. I was fortunate to have two jobs when I first got out of college I had one Jon I worked at during the morning and I had my second job that I started with Verizon. During that time I had the benefit of waking the pros and cons of both situations. Also I was able to form a great friendship and fellowship with a coworker at Verizon. He really helped me alot. Pointed out alot of the ups and downs of the job and showed me where I would basically in my life if I stuck with the company . What I'm try to say is this having someone point out alot of poignant things during your early journey in your career really makes things alot easier than going through the bumps and bruises in real time. During your early stages try to discover things ask alot of questions from people who may work in the field you're interested in. Finally pick a career that chooses you and makes it feel worth it to be at everyday trust me you'll know when you know. Good luck
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Chirayu’s Answer

To find a career that is right for you, it can be helpful to consider your interests, strengths, values, and goals. Here are some steps you can take to help identify your career interests - There are many career assessments available online that can help you identify your interests and strengths. Some examples include the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Strong Interest Inventory, and the Holland Code Career Test. Think about the activities that you enjoy doing and the subjects that you find most interesting. Consider how these interests might translate into potential career paths Look into different careers that align with your interests and strengths. Read job descriptions, conduct informational interviews with people in those fields, and research job outlook and salary information. Think about what is important to you in a career, such as work-life balance, salary, or opportunities for growth and development. Consider internships, volunteer opportunities, or part-time jobs in fields that interest you. This can help you gain experience and insight into different careers. It's important to remember that choosing a career is a process, and it's okay if your interests and goals change over time. Be open to exploring new opportunities and be willing to learn and adapt as you go.
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Radu’s Answer

Simplistic, is like this: Find a Job You Love and You’ll Never Work a Day in Your Life.
Wireless communications are fascinating. At least to me. If you analyze what it takes to have a phone call from A to B, you will be amazed.
Working to make that happen is a privilege and a fulfilled dream for me.
How do you know what is right for you ? Pick something that you love to do. Learn, learn and learn. Develop from there, and find your place doing what you like.
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Ben’s Answer

Jules,

I found my career quite by accident, I crashed a motorcycle and had to redo my enlistment contract with the US Army. What I found was that I had an interest in computers, but did not necessarily enjoy programming all day. I also like being outside for part of my work. When I went into the Army I found myself in Telecommunication which had an environment for both of my likes.

I think the best advice I could give you though is try to be around situations that are interesting to you and learn things that make you want to learn more. The career path will then become more clear as long as you keep moving forward. Keep MOVING Forward!!! even if you find yourself pivoting a little bit as you learn, that is OK, but you cannot wait for the opportunities to come to you, you will need to go to them, even if you don't know where they are yet. For me the military gave me experience that I had not even considered as a career, and then when I went to college, I expanded that education.

If you are looking for ideas of what to do, look around you, look at the people you come in contact with, ideas from TV or movies. Then find out everything you can about that career from internet searches and from asking people already doing it. The biggest lesson to learn is that it is your career and you own it, do not let anyone else tell you what you can or cannot do. If you want it bad enough you can go and get it, even if the road to it is not as clear or as short as someone else's, it is your road not theirs. Good Luck!!!
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Richard J (Rich)’s Answer

Finding a career that was right for me is something that comes from both internal feelings and from external learning. The internal feelings are built from what you consider your passion and what, you your gut and your heart, think you want to do as a career. The external learning part is essentially what you learn about that career and whether that changes your feelings about that career. Also, as you are exposed to other external influences you may find opportunities you never thought existed an find that become of more interest.

I started out in the US Air Force as that or being a police officer was my internal feeling or passion. As I grew in the Air Force I learned of different opportunities and I "seized those opportunities" to pursue other adventures. My Air Force career turned out to be a great adventure as it gave me the opportunity to pursue multiple opportunities. Again, my internal feelings led to external learning which provided a life of exiting and meaningful career pursuits.

So, as someone said, this is not an easy answer. Keep an open mind, keep your eyes open to opportunities, pursue your passion and see where it goes.

I hope this helps.
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Tony’s Answer

When I was growing up as a teenager my father told me that I should go after all things that make me feel happy and that I should never ever force a destiny that is not mine.
I asked him how I know it's not my destiny. He said whatever I put in my good energy and you are feeling that is flowing and everyday you are finding yourself more motivated,
That tells you that you are doing the right things. On the other hand, if life is raising flags that it's not flowing and you are not motivated. Do not force it, find things around you that makes you happy and proud of yourself.
We have the power to choose our career, put all your efforts and listen to your heart. You will know if you are going in the right direction.

Tony recommends the following next steps:

RF Design and Performance Engineer. Proud to be a Verizon employee.
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