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Nurses, What is the best advice you got in high school that has stuck with you?

I hace almost finished my first year of high school and I am taking college course through dual enrollment with a nearby community college. This year has been stressful and I am struggling to stay motivated.

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Lorraine’s Answer

Brooklyn,
Developing good study skills takes practice and gets easier over time. Remember to stay motivated, stay focused, address weaknesses, and maintain persistence during challenging times. Nursing is a challenging but rewarding career that requires hard work, dedication, compassion, and professionalism.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Lorraine. Brooklyn
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Beth’s Answer

Brooklyn you are off to a great start! I started my nursing education at a community college and it served me well (I was able to get my employer to pay for my 4 year BSN later on!)
Study skills are important. Schedule your studying if you need to keep on task. If your chosen community college has a nursing program, see if you can meet some students who have already started the path!
Remember to take care of yourself. Nurses can't take care of patients if they don't practice self-care.
Be well
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! Brooklyn
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Sue’s Answer

Hi there. Great question. As you can read from the previous answers that study skills are so very important, the other thing is to ask questions, get clarification from you instructors if you are confused about anything. Your whole life as a nurse will hinge around team work and getting clarification from doctors that write orders. AND remember don’t ever give up. Keep hope and optimism in your back pocket.
Best wishes.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Brooklyn
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John’s Answer

I'd build on Julie's answer by simply saying that while it's great that you know what you want right now, that is very likely to change over time and as you have more experiences. As you get older and grow as a person, the world will look much different to you than it does now. Things that were very important to me when I was 20 were much less so when I was 30.

If you are a freshman in HS and taking courses at your local community college, then I'd ask this: are you allowing yourself time and the ability to enjoy other interests? Working in the medical field in any role (or being a student) can be very intense and while it is also rewarding, many people burn out because of the high levels of stress and challenges. Being able to have balance in your life is what will allow you to not only survive in those moments when you will have doubts about your career choice, but give you perspective. Focus, dedication, hard work, and determination are all wonderful traits and attributes, but we are all human and we require time and space away from school and work. This time allows us to develop outside interests, hobbies, and relationships that are removed from our roles and having these other pieces as a part of your life gives you something outside of the job to focus on and enjoy. It grounds us.

If it helps, think of it like this, your identity - who you are as a person - should be much more than your job title. Doing what we need to do should be balanced by doing what we like or love to do. If you can keep that in mind and try to maintain some level of balance, you will be better prepared for the challenges that will inevitably come your way.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, John for the advice. Brooklyn
Thank you comment icon You are most welcome. Best of luck to you. John Levesque
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Regan’s Answer

In high school I would consider doing an internship/volunteer position in a field you think you want to study in college to be sure this is something that really appeals to you. If you have a local hospital see if you can volunteer there to help out so you can really see what nurses are doing. It sounds as if you are already busy but this can give you insight if this is really the field for you. When studying I would recommend studying in 45 minute increments. Give yourself a break after this period of time to take a walk or listen to music for a bit before hitting the books again. I also found studying in group settings to be helpful at times when you are working on memorizing things. As a group you can come up with fun ways to remember the material that you may not have considered on your own! Group sessions allow you to enjoy the experience of studying and build bonds with others studying the same material as you!
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Brooklyn
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Amber’s Answer

Focus on study habits and find how you learn best! If you are able to form study groups, they can be invaluable. Always ask questions if you have any confusion or are stuck. Chances are, someone else has the same question. As a nurse, I still ask questions. Whether learning something new, or clarifying an order from a doctor.
Good luck and so great to see someone with such a great start!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Brooklyn
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Julie’s Answer

Best advice I received in High School... don't take yourself too seriously, treat yourself and each other with kindness and respect.
Wise words from a very elderly English teacher.
But you asked nurses this question, so I am going to share with you the best advice I received from a nursing school instructor. BE NICE. Always be nice. Patients and their families are unlikely going to know whether you are doing a good job clinically, but they will always know whether you are kind, and that is what they will remember. So both gave the same advice, both are right.
For you, a high school freshman going to junior college, I would say it is important to treat yourself with kindness too. If you are struggling to stay motivated, I would take a hard look at why you are dual enrolling, whether the courses are serving you well (are you taking them to be impressive to colleges, or because you find real value in them?), and if doing so will burn you out before you get to your chosen college major. For nursing, you are guaranteed a nursing shortage for as long as you will work, so trying to get to the top of the group is less important because there just are not enough nurses so you are going to get into school. So my advice. Take courses that excite you, ignite your passion. These will lead you where you need to be. Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! Brooklyn
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