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How do you find your passion and turn it into a career?

I participate in a wide variety of hobbies and activities like track, volleyball, art, band, you name it, I've probably done something similar. I've considered careers in every single one of these areas, but none of them seem to truly stick. I have a suspicion that my true passion could simply be helping people. I've always enjoyed helping people who need it on all levels. But I don't know how I would make it into a stable career.

Thank you comment icon Hi Caitlin! My name is Shianne and I find you question very relatable. I pretty much do everything and anything as well. Do a few sports here and there, join clubs, make clubs, etc. To start off finding your passion can take time. And it looks like you already have a start you like helping people. Which by the way is amazing because everyone deserves kindness and support from people who can give to others. One thing I would suggest is to volunteer at different places. Learn how different businesses work, or help with food banks. Anywhere you can. I hope this helps you. Shianne

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Mustabsheera’s Answer

Finding your passion and turning it into a career involves a combination of self-reflection, exploration, and practical steps. Here's a step-by-step approach to help you discover your passion and transform it into a fulfilling career:

Self-Reflection: Take the time to introspect and identify your interests, values, and strengths. Consider what activities bring you joy and fulfillment, and think about the skills and talents you possess. Reflect on your past experiences, hobbies, and any activities that have made you feel excited and engaged.

Explore Different Fields: Once you have a general idea of your interests, explore various fields and industries that align with those interests. Conduct thorough research to understand the job prospects, required skills, and potential career paths in those fields. Use online resources, read books, attend industry events, and connect with professionals in the areas you're curious about.

Try New Things: To gain a deeper understanding of your passion, try out new activities and experiences. Take up hobbies, join clubs or organizations, participate in workshops or classes, and volunteer in areas that interest you. This hands-on approach will allow you to explore different aspects of your passion and help you determine if it has the potential to become a long-term career.

Seek Mentors and Guidance: Connect with mentors or professionals who have experience in your areas of interest. They can provide valuable insights, advice, and guidance based on their own career journeys. Reach out to them through networking events, LinkedIn, or professional organizations. Their experiences can offer clarity and direction as you navigate your own path.

Experiment and Gain Experience: Look for opportunities to gain practical experience in your chosen field. This could include internships, part-time jobs, freelancing, or volunteering. By gaining hands-on experience, you'll not only learn more about the field but also build a network and develop relevant skills that will enhance your future career prospects.

Continuous Learning: Passion-driven careers often require continuous learning and skill development. Stay updated on industry trends, new technologies, and best practices through online courses, workshops, seminars, and industry publications. Invest in your personal and professional growth to remain competitive and relevant.

Networking and Building Connections: Engage with professionals in your field of interest by attending industry events, joining professional organizations, and leveraging online networking platforms like LinkedIn. Build relationships, seek advice, and learn from others who share your passion. Networking can open doors to new opportunities and provide valuable connections in your chosen field.

Take Calculated Risks: Transforming your passion into a career may require taking risks and stepping out of your comfort zone. Evaluate the potential challenges and sacrifices that may be involved, such as financial considerations or career transitions. Make informed decisions, weigh the pros and cons, and be prepared for setbacks along the way.

Set Goals and Create a Plan: Once you have identified your passion and explored career possibilities, set clear goals and create a roadmap for achieving them. Break down your long-term goals into smaller, actionable steps. This plan will serve as a guide, helping you stay focused and motivated as you work towards your passion-driven career.

Remember that finding your passion and turning it into a career is a journey that evolves over time. Be patient, embrace new opportunities, and remain open to learning and growth. Your passion may evolve and change as you gain more experience and self-awareness, so stay flexible and adaptable throughout the process.
Thank you comment icon This is well thought out and formatted. I agree with this advice! Cameron Hjeltness
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Cameron’s Answer

Hi Caitlin,

I actually just wrote this to someone else and it seems fairly relevant to your question.

I was a mechanical engineer and decided that career left a lot to be desired! I started feeling more and more like a glorified Microsoft Excel user and so I am currently applying to medical school. I became a CNA after quitting my job as an engineer to get familiarity with the medical field, have direct interactions with patients, and to understand the dynamic between other health professionals such as therapists, nurses, and physicians. I found myself working *very* hard, but the entire 8 hour shift would go by as if I had only spent 2 hours on the job. I think whatever you decide, you should look for that kind of feeling in whatever you pursue. It means you are engrossed in your work, at least that's what it meant for me. I never found that feeling as an engineer. I also spent some time job shadowing physicians to know a bit more what I was getting myself into.

Good luck!!
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Sophie’s Answer

Know that if you feel like you can’t decide on a specific career path, you’re like everybody! Graduating high school and trying to find a career path can be stressful! The best advice I have, is keep trying new things! Sign up for volunteering, work in different industries, use your connections to shadow people at work, ask to have a conversation with people about their jobs. Exposure and putting yourself
out there will help create your network and benefit you when you are searching for a career. And even if you think you found what interests you, know
that it can change and that’s ok!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I'm definitely trying to get out there and try new things! It gets a little difficult because of where I live but I'm certainly going to continue trying. It's a bit relieving to know that I don't really have to have my whole life planned out right now and that I still have time to figure it out. Caitlin
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Vallerina’s Answer

Hey there, Caitlin! You've asked an excellent question and I'm genuinely impressed that you're seeking advice from seasoned professionals on this platform!

I can totally relate to your struggle of bridging the gap between passion and work. Just three years ago, I was in your shoes, trying to find that elusive link. But here's the thing, you don't necessarily have to find that connection. It's perfectly okay to choose a career that doesn't align with your passion. You might just stumble upon your passion as you progress in your career, which I believe happens to most of us!

My biggest piece of advice for you right now is to spend some quality time reflecting. Try to envision where you see yourself in the next 5, 10, or 15 years. Also, try to pinpoint the aspects of jobs that you currently enjoy (for instance, if you love interacting with people, careers that require more interaction could be a good fit; if you're more of a solitary worker, look for careers that cater to that preference). Keep in mind that your career path might end up looking quite different from what you're imagining right now!

Wishing you all the best on your journey to the future!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your feedback! It definitely helps to imagine my future and just think about how I'd live my life if I chose that path. I think I'm used to people expecting that I know what I want to do for the rest of my life before I get to college and a career. It's good to know that I don't necessarily have to know, I just have to have a sort of direction like helping others. Caitlin
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Srinivasan’s Answer

First of all i congratulate you for doing what your mind says. Many people choose their career based on what others like for him/her to do.

If you feel helping people is what satisfying you then start up a company which can render service to others. some ideas are A-Z services - meaning anything people need help for which they pay money as service charge.. In India many do this job, services they render are

1) delivering medicines for elderly at their doorsteps
2) Travel assistance - Helping with ticket arrangements and itenerary for family vacations - people are busy sometimes they are ready to pay others who help with arrangemenrs
3) Helping to pay Utility bills.
4) Hire people for cleaning their house and oversee the cleaning work
5) Fimd out what is the pressing issues for people and try to help them.in easing their issues by charging them money for your service.

This list can go on and the limit is your capabilities and skills.

All the best for your bright future.
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Alyssa’s Answer

Reflect on your strong points. Recognizing your soft and hard skills can guide you to the specific hobbies and passions you've spent time honing into personal strengths. You might also have a natural talent that boosts your confidence and motivation when tackling certain tasks. As you delve into the things that naturally catch your eye in your daily life, consider what aspects of these things ignite your passion.

For instance, you might discover that teaching adult night classes as a volunteer is the best part of your day. Ask yourself, "What is it about this activity that brings me joy?" Some possible answers could be:

- Delving into a particular subject
- Taking a leadership role in my community
- Assisting others

Looking at job descriptions could help you identify roles that naturally appeal to you. If a certain task or duty catches your interest, it might lead you to explore other related roles that could be an even better match.

Consider discussing your interests and what you find motivating with your manager or employer. If you enjoy your company but feel uninspired in your current role, there might be opportunities for you to take on more responsibilities that match your interests or to shift to a different position within the company.
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Lukas’s Answer

It depends on your priorities and on your personal character. There is an infinite amount of jobs, and you can always help someone, no matter if you're a doctor or a banker. Simply always seek to help people, and you will excel at your job because you'll love what you do. Good luck!
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Emma’s Answer

I recommend finding what makes you happy, it could stem from hobbies or just something that makes you light up. I had thought that teaching would be a good fit for me, took a week into my freshman semester at college to realize I was wrong. So I changed my major. I think that if you find something that gives you a spark run with that. If the spark eventually fizzles out look for something new. Personally, I have ADHD so picking up something new is relatively easy for me and that may not be the case with you. Find your spark and go with it, it could be something as simple as art, or becoming a radio disc jockey. it all depends on you and your interests. when in doubt try it out and you will find your calling in time. If you are already in college don't be afraid to change your major, I've known people who have changed theirs twice within a year. You got this!

Emma recommends the following next steps:

try out different things to find your spark
take the spark and run like the wind
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