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Anyone in healthcare ?

What do you do now? Would you recommend that job or if you could go back in time what would you become? Pay and schooling ratio… is it good?

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Michel’s Answer

Currently still a medical student. I wouldn’t change a thing I am very happy that one day I will have an MD and make a difference in the medical field. The journey is long, but I love learning so I am blessed in that aspect.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Ryley
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Samuel’s Answer

I am a Certified Clinical Medical Assistant(NHA) & a Certified Medical Assistant (AAMA.) If I could go back in time, I would have went immediately to medical school to become a doctor. At the time I graduated high school, I was not sure what I wanted to do & I was discouraged because I did poorly. Having said that, I know now that I am smart enough to have become a doctor & I have what matters most; a desire to help people. I am cool with what I do now but in hindsight, I wish I had been more motivated. The advantage of a healthcare career is that there will always be a need for medical professionals: job security. As far as pay, I have worked in other careers which paid just as well but in hazardous conditions. Lastly, co workers in medical are smart, compassionate & willing to teach ,most of the time.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Ryley
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Mustafa’s Answer

As a dedicated neurologist who specializes in multiple sclerosis/neuroimmunology and stroke, I strongly advocate for anyone interested in the medical field to consider a career in neurology. The demand for neurologists is on the rise. This increasing need is not just confined to the USA but is a global phenomenon, largely due to the escalating life expectancy which consequently leads to a surge in neurological issues among a growing population.

If given the chance to revisit my career choice, I would undoubtedly choose neurology again. My decision wasn't driven by the prospect of a lucrative income, but rather by a profound fascination with the brain, its intricate complexity, and its incomparable beauty. The only other realm I find equally captivating is physics, from the quantum to the cosmic level. To me, the cosmos and the brain are intertwined, and one cannot truly appreciate the magnificence of one without acknowledging the equal splendor of the other.

In addition to treating patients and gaining insights about the brain through diagnosis and treatment, I employ the principles of physics to comprehend the functioning and malfunctioning of the brain. I strive to refine treatments using the precision of mathematics and the thought process of a theoretical physicist. The duration of my education was never a deterrent, as my passion and the sheer beauty of mathematics, physics, and neurology kept me wholly engrossed and oblivious to the passage of time. I was like a swift-flowing river, undeterred and largely unaware of my surroundings.

While neurologists do start with a high income that only escalates, financial gain was always a secondary consideration for me. In our community, the Tzaddukhim, we are educated from the age of seven in our religious schools about financial literacy and wealth accumulation. Our hakhamim and those in finance and investment guide us. Thus, when we start earning, we also begin investing with the aim of building liquid wealth and avoiding debts under the guidance of our hakhamim. Our investment strategy includes allocating about 30% of our investments in gold bullion, 22K gold jewelry, rubies, emeralds, and pearls.

With this investment approach and financial discipline, the income derived from work becomes less significant after 25 years of practice. The income from investments gradually becomes a larger portion of the annual income than that from work. This shift occurs well before retirement, a concept we do not adhere to, regardless of our years of service or accumulated wealth. For us, work is not just a means of earning, but also a form of nourishment for the body and mind, and a form of worship.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Ryley
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Marlena’s Answer

Ryley, great questions! I wound never change nursing as my career choice! I've been in acute care, long term care/skilled, education, writing supplemental, given poster, research, and national presentations of my work. If I had to do anything again, I would say my thoughts of wanting to be a director of Nursing for a ltc/skilled facility. As a CNA I thought it would be wonderful to be a DON. It wasn't the title or anything, it was about being over a building and overseeing all clinical aspects to ensure excellent care under my watch. That's not the way things transpire and while things go well, any bad thing falls directly on your head. Whether it was you or not because they all fall under you. Things can go badly, I've seen some lose their license over issues that happen. Not saying I wouldn't do it again, in the right building and under the right circumstances, but for now, top seat isn't my thing. I'm better at educating, nurturing, and supporting staff and the DON.
In terms of money for schooling, yes and no...depending how far you go and how you use it, yes! If your an educator like I was, no...I obtained my doctorate degree to teach, but no matter how big the university or how small, the pay is not worth the money spent on school. However, loan forgiveness made it worth it but still lived payday to payday, comfortable, but not a lot of extra stuff! Nurses don't make as much as you think but for 2-4 years of school, it's worth it. Yes, the higher the degree the more money you earn but it's not often you see someone like me, with a doctorate degree, in management, but yes, I do work the floor and do bedside! I stay true to nursing and no matter what, it's about the people who I care for :-) no matter what, to me, nursing is so worth it!

Marlena recommends the following next steps:

Nursing school
Bedside nursing
Travel nursing
Nursing research
Nursing management
Thank you comment icon Marlena, thank you! Ryley
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Nicolas’s Answer

I'm in health services and yes, the amount of money I have made from an investment with a degree is way over what I would have made without one. I don't work directly in the field I studied now, but made sure to pick a field with information I can use anywhere at anytime. I know that it seems a long ways away, but if you look at it like this you will be better benefitted as far as managing your investment. There will be spring, winter, and summer breaks as well as non school days which are times you can get involved. I would plan ahead for a time to get involved knowing these specific timeframes. I would highly recommend for you specifically to get involved in volunteering and work in your field "first" before you truly make a decision about if it's worth the investment or not.
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Ryley
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Stacy’s Answer

I am a phlebotomist, a vital role in the healthcare field. Before that, I was a medical assistant, even before it was recognized as a licensed profession. I also held certifications as a nursing assistant and in electrocardiography. Your diverse experience is commendable!

Have you ever considered becoming a nurse? These background has already given a solid foundation in many areas that nursing encompasses. Plus, nursing offers a higher pay scale and the opportunity to specialize in various fields such as orthopedics, cardiology, or surgery.

Imagine the possibilities as a travel nurse, exploring the world while doing what you love. Yes, the shifts can be long and the patient load might be challenging, especially when dealing with high-acuity patients who require more attention due to their medical needs. But remember, every challenge is an opportunity to learn and grow.

Working 12-hour shifts for 3 or 4 days a week might seem daunting, but once you achieve your Associate Nurse qualification, doors will open for you. Look for a teaching hospital that offers you the chance to float and soak up all the essential knowledge that aligns with your learning journey.

As you advance in your career, you can aim for higher roles like working in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Further your education by obtaining your Bachelor's and Master's degrees, which not only offer a pay boost but also open up opportunities to become a Clinical Instructor or Director.

Remember, every step you take in your career is a step towards achieving your dreams. Keep going, the sky's the limit!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Ryley
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Kaori’s Answer

Hi Ryley! I work in a Molecular laboratory! I won't change my career for anything, I'm so grateful for all the people and experiences I've had. I'm learning more stuff to become the strongest scientist out there! There's so much room to learn and you can make good money if you find the right place. Just keep in mind that building your way up might take time and not focus solely on money in the first years of your career. Keep your mind open and always be coachable and hungry for knowledge! You'll do great!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Kaori! Ryley
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Paul’s Answer

Hi Ryley
I’ma Chief Operating Officer which basically means I run hospitals. I don’t think it’s a career anyone would probably think of unless you happen to think of management and healthcare. There are two types of hospital COO - those that manage all the front line clinical services, and those that manage all the non clinical services that aren’t managed by another c-suite executive like finance or HR. I think it’s the best job in the world as I enable hundreds or sometimes thousands of healthcare workers to provide a better service to patients.
Thank you comment icon Wow interesting, thanks so much !! Ryley
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Caroline’s Answer

Honesty it really depends on what you are interested in. There are so many avenues that you have that it is all about what you like. What you could see yourself doing for a long time. Maybe do some research on your own and see what each sector of the medical field that you are truly interested in.
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Heather’s Answer

As a Speech Language Pathologist at a bustling Level 1 Trauma Acute Care Hospital, I find immense joy in what I do!
In terms of scheduling, it's as flexible as you need it to be! I've had my fair share of working 5 days a week, as well as 3 and 2-day work weeks. If you're on the hunt for a career that can adapt to your life's various stages, this one's a perfect fit!
Do we have autonomy? Absolutely! We're the architects of our own workday. With 10-14 patients assigned to us, we have the freedom to manage our day as we deem appropriate.
As for the educational requirements, a Master's Degree is necessary.
What about job placement options? As a Speech Pathologist, you have the liberty to switch up your work setting. Be it a hospital, school, nursing home, remote location, outpatient facility, or clinic, the choice is yours. You can also decide if you'd prefer working with babies, children, or adults.
I encourage you to explore this profession! I couldn't be happier with my decision to choose this path.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Heather! Ryley
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Michelle’s Answer

Hi Ryley!

As an occupational therapist, I help people who are dealing with injuries, disabilities, or illnesses perform their daily tasks. These tasks can range from dressing themselves, engaging in hobbies, socializing, participating in school and work. OTs with individuals of all ages - from infants to the elderly.

OTs work in many areas of healthcare- mental health, neurology, rehabilitation, substance abuse treatment, pediatrics, geriatrics, dementia, and home health just to name a few. We work in hospitals, schools, nursing homes, clinics, private homes, community settings and others.

For a deeper understanding of what occupational therapy entails, I recommend visiting AOTA.org. It's our professional organization's website and it has valuable information about our field.

As an occupational therapist, I hold a master's degree, though some therapists even have doctoral degrees. Pay is good but varies on the setting and what part of the country you are in.

Given another chance, I might have considered nursing due to the excellent job opportunities and pay. But I absolutely love my job as an occupational therapist!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Michelle! Ryley
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Lisa’s Answer

After dedicating more than three decades of my life to the profession of a Registered Dietitian, I have now entered the phase of retirement. My journey began at WIC, an exceptional Nutrition Program specifically designed for Women, Infants, and Children, where I spent a few fruitful years. The majority of my career, however, was spent in a hospital environment. Both roles were fulfilling, but in retrospect, the WIC program was more generous in terms of employee benefits, including retirement provisions. The field of dietetics provides ample opportunities for career progression, which translates into potential salary growth. I always had a passion for healthcare but was uncertain about the specific area to specialize in. Hence, prior to my college education, I gained exposure in various fields by working as a dietetic aide, a nurse's aide, and a physical therapy aide. This experience helped me identify the field that resonated with me the most.
Thank you comment icon Thanks so much! Can you give your career a little job description ? It sounds interesting! Ryley
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Lisa’s Answer

Hi Ryley,
I'd be happy to answer your question about a further job description as a dietitian. As a nutritionist for the WIC program I was responsible for determining program eligibility, prescription of the WIC food vouchers, and providing nutrition education to the participants. As a clinical dietitian in the hospital I would provide a nutrition diagnosis, assessment, and plan for the patient, including nutrition education. To work as a WIC nutritionist you would need a bachelor's degree in nutrition, and to work as a clinical dietitian you would need to do an internship and take an exam to become a registered dietitian after obtaining your bachelor's degree in nutrition. Both jobs were rewarding! I would say the pay could be better, but there is room for growth within the field.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Ryley
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