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I have a question for nurses, What made you decide to become one?

I'm a highschool junior and I'm considering the career, but a lot of people say it's really stressful and difficult.

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Erin’s Answer

I always enjoyed taking care of people but also giving explanations. I enjoyed Bio and Human Anatomy classes and more than anything, I just liked talking to people about their health. If anything, nursing is being an advocate and that can be really difficult. Ultimately, it can be very emotionally, mentally, and physically exhausting, but it is very rewarding. I worked on an Oncology unit as an RN and worked Oncology as an NP and while that can be a very heavy role, the patients, family members and care teams were amazing. We all knew we were there to help each patient and it created a very positive environment.
Thank you comment icon thank you so much! Jolie
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Christina’s Answer

Hello Jolie,
I started in college with a major of International Relations because I enjoyed languages. However, after my first year, it became clear that it was not the career for me. I took a job that summer as a camp counselor for children with type 1 diabetes and loved it. I found the challenge of learning about diabetes, figuring out how to keep the children's blood sugars in optimal range, and monitoring the children for signs of low blood sugar very interesting and rewarding. It enabled these kids to enjoy a normal camp experience which they otherwise couldn't have had. I turned towards nursing at that point because I knew it would always be interesting, rewarding and would give me good work life balance. Yes, there are times that it is stressful because people get sick and no one lives forever but... you can do a lot to help most people get through or live with their illnesses and learn to be as healthy as possible. The relationships with your patients are very rewarding and staying up on the advances in medicine to give the best care to your patients keeps your job interesting. I retired a year ago after working as an NP in the field of Internal Medicine and Cardiology for the past 35+ years. It was a wonderful career! Go for it.
Thank you comment icon Hi, this was really encouraging. thank you so much! Jolie
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Dolores’s Answer

I chose nursing as I always wanted to help people and especially pediatrics. I specialized in pediatrics and loved every minute of it. It can be stressful as you deal with children with health issues, but it also very rewarding knowing that you are helping them get better. It is truly a team approach in healthcare and it can be very rewarding working with a great team to meet the health care needs of others. All the best in your future choices for a career.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Jolie!

Many folks opt to become nurses for a variety of reasons. Sure, nursing can be tough and stressful, but it also has many rewarding aspects that draw people to it. Let's delve into some common reasons why people choose nursing as a career and address the concerns about its stress and difficulty.

Firstly, a lot of people are drawn to nursing because they want to help others. Nursing is all about caring for people who need medical help. As a nurse, you get to positively affect your patients' lives by offering them care, comfort, and support when they're sick or injured. The chance to make a real difference in someone's life and improve their health is often one of the most satisfying parts of being a nurse.

Job security and stability is another big reason why people choose nursing. The need for nurses keeps growing because of things like an aging population, better medical technology, and more access to healthcare services. This means there are lots of job opportunities for nurses in different healthcare settings like hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home healthcare agencies. Plus, nursing lets you specialize in areas you're interested in, like pediatrics, oncology, critical care, or mental health.

Nursing also gives you the chance to grow professionally. Nurses can keep learning and improving their skills through education and training programs. You can earn advanced degrees or certifications in special areas of nursing, which can lead to higher positions and more responsibilities. Nursing also offers chances for leadership roles, research involvement, and involvement in making healthcare policies.

Nursing can be stressful and challenging, but that's true for many jobs. Nursing involves working in fast-paced environments, making important decisions, and dealing with emotional situations. But with the right support, self-care, and coping strategies, nurses can handle these challenges and keep a healthy work-life balance.

If you're worried about the stress and difficulty of nursing, it's important to learn as much as you can about the profession. Talk to current nurses, shadow professionals in the field, and look into educational programs that give a full understanding of what being a nurse means. Getting practical experience through volunteer work or internships in healthcare settings can also give you a better idea of the everyday responsibilities and demands of the job.

In summary, people decide to become nurses for many reasons. Wanting to help others, job security and stability, and chances for professional growth are some common reasons that draw people to this fulfilling profession. Yes, nursing can be stressful and challenging sometimes, but with the right support and self-care, nurses can handle these difficulties and find satisfaction in their work.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications or Domain Names Used:

1. American Nurses Association (ANA) - www.nursingworld.org
2. National League for Nursing (NLN) - www.nln.org
3. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) - www.bls.gov
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