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Would it be wise to drop out as a sophomore to go ahead and get my GED and start a job?

I'm a sophomore in highschool and I am really tired of how I am treated by teachers lately. Should I drop and and get my GED instead? I really want to get a job soon.

Thank you comment icon Hi Romy, it sounds like a difficult situation you are going through. I don't know specifically what your situation is, but if you feel like it is overwhelming and feel you need someone to talk to, you can reach out to the free resource https://r.kokocares.org/careervillage. I wish you the best! Sharyn Grose, Admin

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Doc’s Answer

Romy I couldn't get past your 1st sentence in your question. "...I am really tired of how I am treated by teachers lately.

ARE YOU BEING DISCRIMINATE
AGAINST AT YOUR HIGHSCHOOL
For example: It is illegal for a school to discriminate on the basis of gender. There are laws that protect students from getting discriminated against. There are different types of unlawful discrimination. It may be unlawful discrimination if your highschool is:

• Treating you differently and worse than others because of who you are or because of who they think you are — this is called direct discrimination;

• Treats you differently and worse because someone you are connected to has a protected characteristic, such as a disabled relative — this is called direct discrimination by association;

• Treating you badly because of something connected to a possible disability — this is called discrimination arising from disability;

• Treating you in a way that is offensive, frightening, degrading, humiliating or distressing — this is called harassment;

• Treating you badly because you complained about discrimination or because they think you complained about discrimination — this is called victimisation.

Try to document any incidents and report them to your parent(s), teacher or counselor. If your highschool doesn't have a form to document the type of discrimination your experiencing, you can submit a complaint in the form of a letter to the district superintendent. Keep a copy of your complaint. Complaints related to bullying, harassment, and discrimination must be filed within 6 months of the problem, and within 12 months for all other problems.

Romy every individual, no matter who they are or where they live, should be treated with dignity. You should not suffer discrimination, or be deprived of any of your rights, because of who you are!
Thank you comment icon I am so grateful to have you as a CareerVillage colleague Kim Doc Frick
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Romy !

This particular situation is one that I believe deserves immediate attention. The quick, easy solution seems to be to quit high school and than go for a GED, but it will greatly affect your future and I do not advise doing that. I want to explain that you have options and I strongly advise that you finish up with your sophomore year and than you can make a beneficial change.

First and foremost, you should have a long discussion about this with your parents. They should be aware of what is happening. Than you should schedule a visit with the school social worker, not to complain, but to discuss the issues and ask for help with coping skills so you can successfully get through the rest of the year. During this visit ask the social worker about your school's confidentiality standards. You will want this visit to be between you and the social worker only. You can also read about various coping skills and learn them from websites on line and instructional videos which you can find on You Tube.

Okay, now that tenth grade is over and you've passed to the eleventh grade, have your parents contact the school district to set up home schooling for you (I am assuming that you are in a public high school). I know, everyone works and how can we homeschool - it can be done. This is another thing that you will need to research. The Meridian Public School District doesn't have their home school guidelines on their website, however, you should go to the administration office or your guidance counselor to obtain information and obtain the guidelines in writing, too. If you do home school through the school district, you may receive a High School Diploma just like everyone else. At least it is that way in the school district I currently live in. But you must gather all the information for this.

Another option is to transfer to a different school for 11th and 12th grade. This will be something that your parent(s) could explore and see if it is doable.

Do not quit school. In life, we are not always going to feel comfortable with every single person we interact with and not everyone is going to like us, either and that is okay. But we can't make rash decisions that will affect us in the future. You were not specific about what it is that the teachers do that you don't like and it does matter. The fact is that you are not comfortable in your current school so changes need to be made for the better. There are about seven more months of school and I think if you work on coping skills you can succeed this year without the drastic move of quitting school. Than again, I do not know the specific ways you are being mistreated and if it is all of your teachers. Focus on your subjects, clubs, friends and recreational activities and know that you can get through this. Ignore any negativity and focus on the school work. It's hard, but adults have to sometimes do this within the work place and in other situations, too. You can do it too.

I do hope this was a bit of help and that you will return here to Career Village for advice on specific elements of this issue. I wish you all the best !
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Brandon’s Answer

Taking the step to leave high school, earn a GED, and kickstart your career is a major move that needs careful thought. It's crucial to balance the possible advantages and disadvantages before making this big decision. Here's a rundown of some factors to ponder:

Pros:

Quick Start to Work: Securing a GED and diving into a job could open doors to the working world earlier, letting you start earning sooner.

Hands-on Experience: Jumping into a job can gift you with priceless real-life experience that can boost your personal and professional development.

Freedom: Having a job could offer you more room to explore your passions and cultivate a sense of independence.

Cons:

Restricted Career Choices: Without a high school diploma, your career choices might be limited, and you might struggle to qualify for certain roles or climb the career ladder in the future.

Long-lasting Impact: Leaving high school prematurely can have enduring effects, possibly limiting your earning capacity and opportunities for further education.

GED Hurdles: Although a GED is an alternative to a high school diploma, it might not be as universally recognized by employers or educational institutions. Some employers and colleges favor candidates with a conventional high school diploma.

Career Aspirations: Reflect on your long-term career aspirations. Certain professions and sectors demand a minimum level of education, and lacking a high school diploma could restrict your choices.

Alternative Considerations:

Dialogue: If you're experiencing difficulties with teachers or the school atmosphere, think about speaking to a counselor or a trusted adult about your worries. There could be ways to resolve the problems without having to leave school.

Digital Learning: Look into other educational routes, like online learning or vocational programs, which could offer a more adaptable and personalized educational experience.

Part-time Employment: Rather than leaving school completely, think about securing part-time work while continuing your studies. This enables you to acquire work experience without completely giving up your education.

Before you make any decisions, it's vital to share your thoughts and concerns with your parents, guardians, or a trusted mentor. They can offer guidance and help you explore other solutions that match your goals and dreams. Also, getting advice from a school counselor or career advisor can provide valuable insights into your unique situation.
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Howard’s Answer

It is not a good idea to drop out. You should finish school and get your degree. A GED is okay. But a diploma is better.
Have you got someone to talk to about this? Your teachers should be helping you not making it harder.
Go to your counselor or the principal if you have to. But you should not be treated badly.
It will be easier to get a job or more education with your degree than a GED.
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Antonio’s Answer

I would not recommend dropping out of High School. GED is recognized as being equal to high school diploma however when applying for jobs you will be limited with GED. Most job require a minimum of High School diplomas without GED being an option. I would continue to pursue to get you High School diploma which would potentially provide more opportunities in life.
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Kim’s Answer

Romy,

"how I am being treated by teachers. . . "

That sentence really does not tell us enough. It could be something like, they call on you in class and you don't know the answers, so you feel they are making you look stupid. It could be that they refuse to recognize your creativity and give you bad grades on assignments that meet the requirements, because they either don't like your creativity or don't like your opinion (such as on an essay.)

The bottom line is this. You need to learn how to face down problems. They don't go away when you finish school. There will always be the possibility of not getting along with someone at work. You don't want to quit your job every time that happens! School, with a safety net of adults (parents and counselors) is a good place to learn this.

Also, if you enjoy school (the social scene) I disagree with the suggestion of home schooling. However, if you aren't into all that, then it's ok.

Finally, you have all your life to work, pay bills, and otherwise be a functioning and productive member of society. It's over-rated.! 65 years of adulthood, approximately. If you think 2 more years of school is bad, wait until adulthood! I personally think the best years of our lives are from 18-22, if you can manage to live at home. Done with school, working, but not having to worry about rent and groceries. Your bills would be car payment, car insurance, fuel, cell phone and other tech stuff. Extra money for saving up for whatever, but also for enjoying life - concerts, etc. So, that's a long-winded way of saying, "slow down!"

If your home life is not good, and you don't feel you can discuss this with your parents, you REALLY need to go to the school counselor.

If you care to respond with more details, we can give you more tailored advice.

Kim
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Hannah’s Answer

Hello Romy,

It would not be a good idea to drop out of high school. Although GEDs are labeled as an "equivalent" to a high school diploma, in practice they are not viewed the same when applying for jobs (depending on your field of choice). A GED could limit your options in the future.

However, I do not think you should continue accepting the treatment of teachers at your current school. I echo the responses above that you should reach out to resources to discuss what has been happening. Additionally, if these resources do not help, I would recommend transferring schools, whether it be to another in-person school or an online.
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