Skip to main content
9 answers
10
Asked 349 views

Why don’t people usually get matched with the career of their choice?

I feel like people don’t usually get the type of jobs they prefer. And insight as to why will be of great help

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

10

9 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sharon’s Answer

Hi Michael! Identifying your passions and strengths is crucial in choosing a career. Just because a certain profession appeals to you, it doesn't necessarily mean you'll excel in it. It's key to have the ability to acquire the skills needed for your desired career and maintain an ongoing interest to keep up with the ever-changing landscape of processes and technologies. Remember, no job is perfect, so it's essential to select a career that not only brings you joy but also aligns with your abilities!

Sharon recommends the following next steps:

Have you taken some aptitude tests? If not, they assist measuring an individual's natural strengths in particular areas. They are non knowledge-based. These can help to identify what skills are your strength and help align different careers that those skills would be useful in.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Abiola’s Answer

It is due to there inability to live up to expectations maybe due to peer pressure or some forms of societal challenges(like increase in tuition fees)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Pamela’s Answer

Hi Michael
Pray🙏🏾I will be praying with you for decision making and God's purpose plan.
There are many reasons why people may not get matched with career of their choice. Some possible factors competition for certain roles, limited job opportunities in a specific field, lack of experience or qualifications, geographical limitations, and personal preferences or values that may not align with certain industries. It's important to explore your interests, skills, and values to find a career path that is both fulfilling and achievable. Additionally, networking, gaining relevant experience, furthering your education, and seeking guidance from career counselors or mentors can help increase your chances of finding a job that aligns with your preferences.

Remember to choose what you love❤️
Wishing you great success!
_Professional Pamela Knight
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Gabriela Marie’s Answer

A lot of the times, the reason is that they haven't explored their options at a young age. For example I knew what I wanted since the sixth grade. Others' may know at a later age, or may need to explore more options. What I would suggest is to take a career test either in High school or your first year of college to see what you are interested in. And counselors' can help you explore more options.
I have three careers, but for the most part I have been working in one area. It is important that you can also study more than one area in case you are not able to find a job instantly after college. It takes time to find a job.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Michael !

Although it may be your perception of people in work right now, as you live life, you will see that it may change. Most people I know are in work they have a passion for and I have observed what you're saying, but it's not true in general, just based on what we may see presently around us. The particular people we know may just be people who dislike their jobs. But as you go through life, you will meet many professionals who you will see love their work. It will depend on who is around you and the choices they've made in their lives.

The truth is that people don't stay with a job they don't like. It all depends upon the person, too. Many people have that one or two or more abilities that they are just so attached to that they feel it's part of their identity. That's a great thing. But it didn't happen overnight. They had encouragement, positive reinforcement, knew where to look for opportunities, an awesome work ethic and are self-directed and driven to contribute to their community. Some people take their time developing into that and you are right, some people never do.

When we go to work, we bring our self into the picture. Some people love other people and some people are bothered by many things so the intrapersonal activity at work can cause issues that make people dread going to work in the morning. It may not necessarily be the work. Many people will stay at a job like that because they need to financially support themselves but many people would quit and move on to better opportunities. So, it depends on the person. People don't get "matched" as you've put it, they put a lot of work into studying and getting experience that leads to great jobs and satisfaction. They worked hard for it and developed their personal skills as well. You get out of life what you put into it.

It's easy to feel defeated, yes, but most of the time, that is a temporary thing. The people you may see that have the experience of not liking what they are doing may create a change for themselves at some point in their life. So what you see now may not be for a lifetime, just a slump that they are experiencing until they take the steps to change it. If it does remain a lifelong thing for a person, that they hate working and are miserable with what they are doing, then there are individualized underlying issues happening and you wouldn't know about them unless they told you what their personal problems are. It is up to them to want to improve their situation and some people do not want to.

My advice for you on this subject is to take steps towards a career that will benefit you. Create the strong educational foundation of your choice, gain wisdom and knowledge, develop socially and go towards a career that you not only have strong interest in but can totally immerse yourself in. You have to do what makes you happy. It won't always be a smooth road because life isn't like that, but you can take steps, make goals that you can achieve and enjoy the journey as much as the end result !
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brandon’s Answer

A good example of people not being matched with the career of their choice could be seen in those that graduate with degrees. Not all people that have a degree works in that field, sometimes they work in a completely different field. In a npfg.org survey the results showed that 29% of people with a degree do not work in their field of study.

A reason I could see that has to do with building experience. For some fields they want an applicant to have a specific amount of time doing or learning a skill before they would think about hiring them (minimum requirements). For example, some stores want to hire a manager, but they don't want to hire a manager without experience. Even if you have a degree in a field, without that experience they do not want to hire you. However, if you get that experience in another job then apply to that position or a similar one, then the chances of you being hired goes up drastically.

Sometimes it is more of a strategic decision.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Meghashree’s Answer

Hi,
The suggestion or the advice that I want to give is because of clarity and awareness in career or profession anyone want to choose.

Meghashree recommends the following next steps:

Firstly do a SWOT analysis of thyself
Chart out the first line and second line of career or professional options
According to strengths have clarity what one wants to opt for
Slowly work side by side on weakness or threats and convert them to opportunities
Always give high priorities to strengths and never stop learning and growing thyself
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

ian’s Answer

By Accident
As unromantic as this sounds, this is the most common way of people entering a career. When people give advice to “network”, what they actually mean is “manufacture serendipity” and increase your chance of positive randomness.

I’ve heard countless stories of a random family member offering someone a job that leads to another job, which in turn leads to a career decision. Randomness is so frequent in career decisions that Nassim Taleb could write a separate book on it.

If people want to give career advice, being in the right place at the right time should be it. While this strategy leads to random, unfitting careers, at least it leads to a path.

Through Apathy
I think it’s impossible to overstate how lost people truly are. Through misguided parenting and faults in our educational system, most people graduate from high school with absolutely no idea what to do. Being forced into earning money is an opposing force that combats apathy, but that’s a limited core strategy when it comes to making a career choice.

Another version of this is constant “education” through post-secondary systems. What to do if you aren’t sure what you want to do? Go back to school! Over and over again. Apathy also leads to many people in graduate school still trying to find something that interests them.

Apathy is dangerous because it usually leads to careers with limited entry friction. Most people in this category stumble into whatever they can get, not realizing their full potential or interacting with enough people to get lucky by accident.

Through Social Pressure
Sailor performs an underwater fillet weld in a training pool at the ROK engineering school.

Parents and friends are the #1 and #2 career advice centres, respectively. 18+ years of being influenced by these groups —who in turn get their advice from their parents, friends and the media— leads to a lot of one thing: dogma.

A dogmatic approach to choosing a career is never a good idea. If your great-great-great-grandfather had some gripe with his local blacksmith, it’s possible that his hatred for the profession has been passed down through parenting. And now, for some reason, you think people who are welders are awful people.

You see this most acutely in the middle to upper-middle class of society. Lots of people go to university and study “socially acceptable” degrees to get “socially acceptable” jobs. Those jobs usually rhyme with investment banker, lawyer, accountant, doctor and consultant.

It’s much more terrifying to stand alone than it is to follow the crowd.

You’ll notice something about these three methods. They are all reactive strategies. Being purely reactive is what leads to 80% career dissatisfaction, countless career changes and unhappiness. There are only two ways to find a career that “fits”:
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Some people may not choose the career they have interest. They may have their own reasons or due to other priorities, e.g. income, location, family preference, etc.. The most important is to find out what career you have interest.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would you like to be a musician, musical artist, singer, music producer, music composer, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you have interest
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in colleges
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
May Almighty God bless you!
0