5 answers

How hard is it to have two majors or multiple minors?

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I'm someone with vast interests from acting to journalism to government to human rights, but wants to major in marketing.
#psychology #theater #marketing #majors #minors #business #government

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5 answers

Ria’s Answer

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Hey Carolina! Marketing would make a great minor for any of your major interests. Many students do hold a major and minor. I was a double major in college and while that was academically challenging, I do not regret it at all. Having two majors allowed me to dive deeper into my interests which was rewarding in and of itself. I would highly suggesting making a course plan (take some time in the summer before college) and map out all the requirements for both your major(s) and/or minor(s) along with any liberal core requirements your school may have. While this may seem daunting, it definitely helps you during course registration and for staying on track for a timely graduation. Planning is the key! :)

Ria recommends the following next steps:

  • Check out your school's course requirements for the majors and minors you are interested in and your school's core requirements. Talk to your first-year adviser when you get to school as they can help in the planning process as well.
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Kelly Michelle’s Answer

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Hi there! I had two majors and a focus which is similar to a minor however a few classes less.

If your degrees that you wish to pursue are under the same college at your university your classes may overlap so it will reduce your coursework in some cases.

It can be a challenge because your classes will be varied and your schedule may be a bit hectic compared to a single degree plan. As a future career person you will stand out as you will be able to multi task and handle a wider variety of projects compared to your peers.


Multiple degrees and minors are only a good option if you can handle the workload , remember the material and score well.

If you are able to stay organized, manage your time, and learn the material it is a great option and uses every dollar towards your schooling!

I hope this helps!

Kelly Michelle recommends the following next steps:

  • Talk to the university you plan to attend and get sample degree plans
  • shadow careers and find mentors with the jobs you may want to see if it is something you wish to pursue
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Eva’s Answer

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Good question. It really depends on the two Majors or degrees and the required classes. I got 2 degrees in 4 years of undergrad. It meant that I came in with a few credits and that I had to take classes in the summer. It worked out for me, but I would caution you in focusing on getting those classes completed in the summer as opposed to starting internships. It made it more difficult for me to get a job after graduating, because I did not have work experience. I would strongly suggest prioritizing internships as opposed to getting two majors. It was fun to learn both subject and I really wanted to be able to tell people I had two degrees as opposed to one major and a minor, but in all honesty, it would have been better to have the minor and get job experience instead.

If you can do both, work and school, then I would suggest getting the dual majors. If that is too much work or you are too stressed, then just take a minor.
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Andrea’s Answer

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Hi, Carolina - Earning multiple majors is a great way to differentiate yourself from other job seekers and deepen your skill set. I did something similar and double majored in Advertising and Marketing with a minor in Graphic Design. I'm so glad that I did, but I'll be honest. It was a lot of work!

Below are a few ideas that might be useful to you.

Good luck!

Andrea recommends the following next steps:

  • - Take Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high school. If you score high enough on AP test(s), you can earn credits at your college.
  • - Take summer courses. You can take them at your college. Another potentially less expensive option is to take courses at a nearby community college. If you decide to do that, just make sure the credits will transfer. I took two courses at a community college before realizing not all the credits would transfer.
  • - Pursue internships with local employers and see if you can get college credit for that work. I did marketing internships with non-profit groups and was able to get credits for that work because it was in my pursued area of study. This was probably my favorite way to earn credits because I was getting on-the-job experience at the same time.
  • - Look at opportunities on campus in your desired area of study. I hosted a campus radio show once a week and got credit for those efforts because I was pursuing a related degree.
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Jessica’s Answer

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Hi Carolina,


Are you taking any dual enrollment courses in high school? I found by getting some of the general credit requirements out of the way in high school, it helped take the course load pressure off a bit in college. That way you could have a minor without overloading yourself. Like Kelly said, it's only if you can handle the workload.


Jessica

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