4 answers
Asked Viewed 110 times Translate

What are the best and worst parts of your job?


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
4
100% of 4 Pros

4 answers


Updated Translate

Donna’s Answer

The best parts: independence and the freedom to determine my schedule. This is especially true for an appellate attorney, because I might work hard to write a brief, but when it is filed and I am waiting for the opposing party's brief, I can relax. In the past, I would schedule my vacations around due dates. I like the mental stimulation and learning new things as every appeal is different. I like the feeling that I am helping people and doing something important, even though it might just be by getting the client money or avoiding payment of money. I much prefer enforcing a right or establishing new law, but most of it is about money.

The worst parts: when you cannot get justice for your client because of the bias of a judicial officer. It can be pretty stressful too because as an appellate attorney, you are like the caboose on a train. I might be the client's last chance to get justice and it can weigh heavily on me. And I hate dressing up and doing to court! I would much prefer to be writing a brief in my pajamas! Also, it can be hard dealing with aggressive attorneys and unreasonable judges who have their minds made up.

0
Updated Translate

Aram’s Answer

Good question. The best part by far is the opportunity to always learn something new, whether it is in the law itself or in the business of one of your clients. For example, I might get a client that has a pharmaceutical distributorship, which means I have to learn how the actual business works before applying my knowledge of the laws or rules that govern that client's set of issues. Another day, I may get a client that does web ad placement, so I have to learn the basics of that business in order to give advice. On any given day, I never know exactly what might hit my desk, and that keeps the practice fresh. Additionally, it's a career that allows you to meet new and interesting people all the time. If you enjoy that and you are good with people you can excel. The downside for me is the administrative stuff, I am not a fan of paperwork, billing for my time (we bill in 6 minute increments for most clients, which means we are always timing every project, phone call or email). Lastly, the part I most dislike is having to chase down clients for payment; it doesn't happen often, but when it does, it's frustrating because it takes away from time that could be spent actually practicing law, and since what we sell is service, it feels like someone has stolen your time from you. Notwithstanding that, it is a job that can be extraordinarily rewarding, especially if you find a niche and make a place for yourself in a space that interests you and keeps you inspired.

0
Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

My wife is a Bankruptcy attorney. She says the best part of her job is that she is actually helping people that have had a change in financial status due to medical problems of themselves or family members, divorce, or loss or change in a job. The second best part is that she has some flexibility in her schedule since she is part of a very small firm.

The worst part (which could also be considered good in some respects) is that every case is different so it takes some time to learn the aspects of each case. She may have to learn about the client's business, or a new rule of law how it applies to their case. Also, some Chapter 11 bankruptcy cases take a lot of time. She worked until 10 PM the other night getting a plan ready for a court deadline.

0
Updated Translate

Noah’s Answer

I think it really depends on what type of law you choose to practice. If you choose public interest, I think the best part is helping those who might not otherwise receive help. If you go into a more traditional firm, you'll also get the satisfaction of helping your client's needs. As someone who has done both, I can tell you undoubtedly the worst part is mental fatigue from constant bad news. No matter how much you help someone in the end, clients/individuals are coming to you for help because something bad has happened to them. Mentally, it is difficult to hear depressing/sad/unhappy stories on a daily basis.

0