6 answers
Asked Viewed 119 times Translate

What are different types of neuroscience careers you can get with an MD?

I am in my last year of undergraduate for a neuroscience major and just started thinking I want to do pre-med. But, I am struggling with what speciality I would wanna do with an in MD related to neuroscience . I am very interested in forensics so like forensic neuropathology (but scared I might get squeamish with autopsies), forensic neuropsychology, or just plain neuropathology/neuropsychology. I would prefer to not work super directly with patients but instead more so study a brain and brain scans. However, I think it would be cool to do tests on people's cognitive abilities and how it relates to their brain abnormalities they might have, specifically those of criminals or psychopaths just because their brains interest me! #medical #doctor #md #neuroscience #medical-school #pre-med #forensic #forensicneuropathology #forensicneuropsychology #neuropsychology #neuropathology


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
7
100% of 5 Pros

6 answers


Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

Good answers have been given. As a radiologist, I want to second the idea of neuroradiology and neurointerventional radiology. Neuroradiology involves reading scans of brain and spine. As a neurointerventional radiologist, you could also use your knowledge to directly catheterize blood vessels and dissolve large vessel occlusions in the brain to reduce the effects of a stroke.

0
Updated Translate

Richard’s Answer

Good answers have been given. As a radiologist, I want to second the idea of neuroradiology and neurointerventional radiology. Neuroradiology involves reading scans of brain and spine. As a neurointerventional radiologist, you could also use your knowledge to directly catheterize blood vessels and dissolve large vessel occlusions in the brain to reduce the effects of a stroke.

0
Updated Translate

Bonnie’s Answer

There’s some great advice here already, and here’s something else to consider: don’t pressure yourself to start settling on a specialty until you finish pre-med, pass your qualifying exams, interview and get an acceptance letter, matriculate, start classes, meet potential mentors, and complete a few clerkship rotations. Maybe you’ve got one or more of the early steps checked off your list, but my point is that a lot of new experiences on your future path will affect your journey to a specialty. (spoiler: there are many steps from here to attaining your MD and starting a residency!) My best advice is to not get so locked into a path early on that you miss some unexpected turns that could take you on a more satisfying journey.

Bonnie recommends the following next steps:

Graduate with yor pre-med.
Start medical school.
Investigate potential mentors and role models.

0
Updated Translate

Rachel’s Answer

Neurology and neurosurgery and neuroradiology are all specialties that focus on the nervous system. These are very diverse specialties and involve different amounts of training. Neurology is a 4 year residency after medical school. Neurosurgery is 6 or 7 year residency. Neuroradiology is a 2 year fellowship after a 5 year radiology residency.

0
Updated Translate

Rita’s Answer

Here are some neuroscience careers to consider that are not patient facing:

Rita recommends the following next steps:

1. Machine Learning Engineer
2. Neuroscience Researcher
3. Pharmaceutical Scientist
4. Research & Development

0
Updated Translate

Estelle’s Answer

The main specialties would be neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. All require a 4 year medical degree followed by a residency (on the job training).

0