5 answers

what should I do to prepare for medical school?

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is I am bad at taking tests is the MCAT going to be a disaster, and what classes/ majors are best to do in undergrad? does where you attend school for undergrad matter?
#medicine #pre-med #medical-school #surgery

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5 answers

Candace’s Answer

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A good pre-med program is helpful with preparation and there are also summer programs that also help you with test taking and preparing for the MCAT. Some of these programs have scholarships and include room and board. If your dream is to become a doctor, you will achieve it if you put in the work. That doesn't meaning get A's on everything. It means developing good study habits, asking for help when you need it and working hard. Best of luck with your pursuits!!

Hello Candace! I really like your answer. It is very helpful to know that having straight A's is not as important as getting good study habits. Many people, myself included, focus too much on that portion of education. I'll definitely keep your answer in mind when the time comes around for me. Have a nice day! Libbie M. Translate
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William’s Answer

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I would suggest you pick a college or university that has a very strong pre-med program. This will not only prepare you for medical school but will also help you with MCAT.
No matter what discipline you are interested in, preparation is key. You pick the best colleges or universities which will give you the best preparation for the discipline you are interested in.
This does not mean you go to an Ivy league school. I went to Juniata College, which at the time had one of the strongest pre-med programs among the colleges in the United States. I was very well prepared for medical school.


Hope this helps.


Bill Cox

Hello, Dr. Cox. I have a question about your response: will med schools look more for which school you went to or how prepared you are? Libbie M. Translate
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Richard’s Answer

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In the US, to apply to medical school, you need a bachelor's degree. Any 4-year university should suffice.

Pick a college that suits your personality and a major that interests you. You will need to get good grades in college in order to apply for medical school. At the medical school I attended, the average GPA is reported to be 3.85, so even one or two B's can hurt your chances of acceptance.

Aside from this, any major is acceptable as long as you complete the prerequisite courses.

Typical medical school prerequisites include:
Biology: Lecture – 4 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
General Chemistry: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Organic Chemistry: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Biochemistry: Lecture – 1 semester
General Physics: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Math: Statistics – 1 semester
English: Rhetoric (Composition) and Literature – 2 semesters



During college study for and complete the MCAT.
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Rachel’s Answer

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Major in whatever field interests you and will allow you to maintain an excellent GPA. I majored in Spanish literature and had no trouble with my med school applications. You do need to complete the pre-med requirements that vary from school to school. These include at least a year of biology, 1 year inorganic chemistry, 1 year organic chemistry + labs, physics, calculus, and biochemistry. Your junior year, you will need to take an MCAT study course prior to taking the MCAT. With a solid GPA and MCAT score, you should be a competitive applicant.
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Estelle’s Answer

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Don't pysch yourself out by convincing yourself that you are bad at taking tests. Spend a great deal of time preparing for the MCAT so that you feel your best going in. Take lots of practice tests and identify the weaker areas so that you can do really well in the actual exam. If you don't meet your expectations or feel you can do better, try again. Medical schools like to see people who don't give up.

Pick a major that interests you and add the premed requirements to that degree plan.

Where you go to undergrad is less important than your GPA and MCAT scores.
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