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ACROSS ALL FIELDS Why do you love your job?

Many people hate their jobs, almost everyone longs for weekends, I get that. But what got you into your profession in the first place? What did you study in college and how did that effect your career? And why do you love your job? Is it working with people? Being creative? The high pay? All answers are welcome. #doctor #engineer #teacher #finance #fashion #design #architecture #programmer


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Andy’s Answer

Hi Lisa,


You ask a great question. And it's one that too few people ask themselves before they get stuck in jobs and careers that they aren't passionate about.


I love my job because I've enjoyed making art since I was a kid. Actually, I had done a time capsule, "Letter to my future self" thing back in 6th grade. In it, I had imagined having a job making art for video games. A couple of decades later and I had achieved that goal. And having been in the industry for 10 years I can honestly say that I've had a great time at some wonderful companies.


However, it wasn't a straight shot from 6th grade to the video games industry. I ended up meandering a bit and majored in biology at UC Berkeley. I enjoyed my time there and my field of study but art was always on my mind. I eventually worked in IT management while pursuing a masters degree in art. When I finally finished the program I was fortunate that a friend from Berkeley was working at Electronic Arts and got my portfolio to the right people allowing me to get my foot in the door.


My coworkers have been and continue to be fun to work with. I've been additionally fortunate to have had great managers and art directors who have helped me to develop and advance my skills. I've also learned much from my friends and peers. For me, personally, it's kind of hard to find anything to complain about; getting paid to paint and draw for video games that entertain people all over the world. I can be creative and artistic and analytical when coming up with ideas to fit certain games and mechanics. It's challenging yet fun work.


And of course I'm fortunate to have a very nice salary and plenty of perks like free meals, snacks, video game lounges, and the like in addition to basic things like health care, 401(k) plans, and other financial benefits.


So yeah, I have many, many reasons to love my job. I hope that you are able to find a job that you love as well.


thank you for your information devi U.

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Andrei’s Answer

Hello Lisa,
Well, I was in kindergarten when a MIG-17 jet-fighter flew over the play ground, and instantly I knew that my life will revolve around aviation. I started to read about airplanes, building model planes, visiting airports and museums, basically learning everything I could about them. When I came to America, it got easier, there was a lot more access to that side of aviation. Aviation High School, and later College of Aeronautics, and all the airports in the NYC area helped shape my career. I love my job, no, I will never say "Thank God its Monday", but I love what I do. For me there is something extremely satisfying about watching the aircraft you worked on, take off into the wild blue yonder. Aviation is one of those things that you get involved in because you love it and can't think of anything else you would rather do. The pay is OK, and if you do your job right, no-one would even know what you did. Ever take an airline flight, and when you land people start to clap? They are clapping for the pilot that drove the plane for the last couple of hours. Nobody thinks of the mechanic that spent all night making sure that when the pilot clicks a button, it does what its supposed to do. Everyone in aviation is part of a team, and we need each other to make it all work, we take great pride into what we do and we do it to the best of our ability. I must have watched a million take-offs, and yet I still watch them with fascination and find them magical.
Good luck finding your dream, and follow it! Go with your hart, and everything else will follow.

Thank you for the inspirational answer, sir! I wish I had the type of passion that you do for your work. I'll definitely keep this in mind because work fulfillment and happiness is what I want to strive for instead of money. Thank you once again, sir, please keep on inspiring young students like me! Aun M.

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Theresa’s Answer

I love to paint! Always have but didn't consider it for a career until I was in my mid thirties. I have 4 daughters so parenting was first, but I was always making signs for school and church or painting gifts to save money, etc. While I was busy doing other things I became a competent painter. I wish I'd started earlier.
Since I turned 40 I have been the Paint Shop Manager or an Exhibits Shop, Painted multi-million dollar exhibits, and currently paint only in large theaters and museums as well as restorative painting and faux finishing. I just kept at it. I never finished college (Art Major) but have been in my own painting school most of my life.


People refer you and only care about results, ethics and attitude. It is your steadfast passion coupled with a humble attitude that makes you good and marketable. Learn your trade, do free-bees at first, then charge according to your skill. Just goes up from there. Oh yeah, and make friends with a few failings but work through them. Get to the other side with your chin up.


thank you for your information!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! devi U.

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Brandi’s Answer

I love my job because (and this is going to make me sound horrible) I like picking apart someone's work and finding problems with it. That type of work has appealed to me since I can remember. From dismantling things, to editing papers, to checking homework, it's all fun to me.


I think it's fun to go to work and interact with people. I LOVE people. I was a Stay At Home Mom for a couple of years and, while I love my daughter, it made me realize that the lack of human interaction is impossibly boring.


There are days when I don't want to go to work. But my job is fun!


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Toshiro K.’s Answer

Dear Lisa,


I think there is an intrinsic human desire to work on something that matters significantly positively to either a targeted group of people or some large number of people. Being able to do that in a career where one has a measure of proficiency (while having at most a manageable amount of stress) is probably what makes a job really great. I can tell you my story.


I was interested in computers from an early age where my father took me to the Lawrence Hall of Science (http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org). This was the only place one could gain access to a reasonably powerful computer in those days. I was particularly interested in the program ELIZA (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELIZA). During college, I studied math and physics thinking of how I can apply computational methods to these fields. Those majors dovetailed nicely into my Ph.D. which was on developing new methods of solving complex mathematical equations, such as those that model how artificial arteries are formed.


Afterwards, I was a college professor for a number of years, where I enjoyed both researching new ways of applying computational methods to new chemical and biological problems and teaching students computer science. That was very enriching in that one gets to see students learn and grow as well as develop some new knowledge.


For a while I wanted to do more research in computational biology so I worked at a couple of academic institutions in the Boston area. I think the most rewarding part of the job was developing software that helps diagnose patients with novel genetic diseases and discovering new mechanisms of cancer. After that, I worked at a pharmaceutical start up writing software to help develop a new class of drugs. In both cases, it was about impact of the work on a number of patients. That was really great. OK, the fact that the start up eventually went public was a real monetary bonus. :-) But, in all seriousness, I generally don't think of money as the primary reason in selecting a job. I think really enjoying a job leads to success which has the side effect of having monetary rewards.


Finally, I wound up at Google where I work in improving the search experience. Indeed, I came full circle from my early days of liking ELIZA since much of what I do day to day is on natural language parsing. What makes this job really fabulous is that the software is used to help hundreds of millions of users around the world. Google lets employees take ownership of projects and allows then to think about how best to improve things often through some creative ways. I get to do this job with great coworkers in a terrific environment with great perks (and it does pay nicely).


In the end, for me it is about what do I leave behind. If I can say I did a good job in helping improve in some (maybe even small) way lives of others, then it was pretty good.


I hope this helps. Best wishes!


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Andrei’s Answer

Hello Lisa,
Well, I was in kindergarten when a MIG-17 jet-fighter flew over the play ground, and instantly I knew that my life will revolve around aviation. I started to read about airplanes, building model planes, visiting airports and museums, basically learning everything I could about them. When I came to America, it got easier, there was a lot more access to that side of aviation. Aviation High School, and later College of Aeronautics, and all the airports in the NYC area helped shape my career. I love my job, no, I will never say "Thank God its Monday", but I love what I do. For me there is something extremely satisfying about watching the aircraft you worked on, take off into the wild blue yonder. Aviation is one of those things that you get involved in because you love it and can't think of anything else you would rather do. The pay is OK, and if you do your job right, no-one would even know what you did. Ever take an airline flight, and when you land people start to clap? They are clapping for the pilot that drove the plane for the last couple of hours. Nobody thinks of the mechanic that spent all night making sure that when the pilot clicks a button, it does what its supposed to do. Everyone in aviation is part of a team, and we need each other to make it all work, we take great pride into what we do and we do it to the best of our ability. I must have watched a million take-offs, and yet I still watch them with fascination and find them magical.
Good luck finding your dream, and follow it! Go with your hart, and everything else will follow.

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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Lisa P. Thanks so much for your question. I see that you posted this question a little while ago so I hope my answer to you (or others who may read this response) is still helpful.

I love my job, more specifically, I love the career that I have built, because it has been and continues to be multifaceted. The variety of my work is what maintains my interest. My interest is fueled by being naturally curious about how things work. My interest fuels the types of projects I get to work on. What I have also found is the more interesting and/or impactful the project is, the more interesting and impactful the people I get to work with are. Common goals generally create a collaborative environment...that is a desire for knowledge sharing and building upon each team members' strengths.

My career has spanned both technical and non technical business areas. I am formally trained as a systems engineer but I have and continue to do lots of work that requires writing code, data analysis and data science and communicating with partners across various business entities.

May sound a bit strange but what I also love about my career are the types of problems I have seen and contributed to fixing. As you move along in your career, you tend to encounter problems that are bigger than one person can fix. These also tend the be the environments in which I learn the most.

And then there is the pay :). Interest, diligence, results-based success, good partners...these are some of the things that, when done well, ensure that good pay will and does come.

Best of luck to you!

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